How Many Slaves Used The Underground Railroad In Kansas?

It is estimated that as many as 900-1000 slaves were helped out of Kansas along underground railroads from 1856-1860.

How many slaves used the Underground Railroad?

The total number of runaways who used the Underground Railroad to escape to freedom is not known, but some estimates exceed 100,000 freed slaves during the antebellum period. Those involved in the Underground Railroad used code words to maintain anonymity.

Was there an Underground Railroad in Kansas?

In the early years of Kansas Territory many slaves came through Kansas on their way to freedom. The informal network that aided these formerly enslaved people in their escape attempts was dubbed the Underground Railroad.

How many slaves did the Underground Railroad ultimately help to free?

Established in the early 1800s and aided by people involved in the Abolitionist Movement, the underground railroad helped thousands of slaves escape bondage. By one estimate, 100,000 slaves escaped from bondage in the South between 1810 and 1850.

Were there slaves in Kansas City?

As fur traders, explorers, and settlers moved into the Kansas City area, African Americans were among them – most, however, came as slaves. In the late 1850s, many sought freedom via the Underground Railroad, crossing the Missouri River to Quindaro, Kansas, a headquarters for free-state advocates.

What made slavery illegal in all of the United States?

Passed by Congress on January 31, 1865, and ratified on December 6, 1865, the 13th amendment abolished slavery in the United States and provides that “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or

How many slaves did Harriet Tubman save?

Fact: According to Tubman’s own words, and extensive documentation on her rescue missions, we know that she rescued about 70 people —family and friends—during approximately 13 trips to Maryland.

Where is the Underground Railroad in Kansas?

The Quindaro Underground Railroad Museum is housed in the Vernon Multipurpose Center. The Center was designated as an historical site by the State of Kansas on August 21, 2004. The center was built in 1936 and formerly served as an elementary school. Bishop and Mrs.

Where did slaves hide in the underground railroad?

People known as “conductors” guided the fugitive enslaved people. Hiding places included private homes, churches and schoolhouses. These were called “stations,” “safe houses,” and “depots.” The people operating them were called “stationmasters.”

Why did Harriet Tubman wear a bandana?

As was the custom on all plantations, when she turned eleven, she started wearing a bright cotton bandana around her head indicating she was no longer a child. She was also no longer known by her “basket name”, Araminta. Now she would be called Harriet, after her mother.

How did Harriet Tubman find out about the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad and Siblings Tubman first encountered the Underground Railroad when she used it to escape slavery herself in 1849. Following a bout of illness and the death of her owner, Tubman decided to escape slavery in Maryland for Philadelphia.

Does the Underground Railroad still exist?

It includes four buildings, two of which were used by Harriet Tubman. Ashtabula County had over thirty known Underground Railroad stations, or safehouses, and many more conductors. Nearly two-thirds of those sites still stand today.

Did people in Kansas own slaves?

Slavery existed in Kansas Territory, but on a much smaller scale than in the South. Most slaveholders owned only one or two slaves. Many slaves were women and children who performed domestic work rather than farm labor.

How many slaves did Kansas have?

The number of slaves in Kansas Territory was estimated at 200. Men were engaged as farm hands, and women and children were employed in domestic work.

Underground Railroad – Kansapedia – Kansas Historical Society

Many slaves passed through Kansas Territory on their route to freedom during the early years of the territory’s existence. The Underground Railroad was the name given to the informal network of people who assisted these previously enslaved persons in their attempts to elude capture. Despite the fact that this trail was neither a train nor an underground passage, it did transport people from the South to the North in a hidden manner. It is hard to tell how many persons were able to escape through this scheme, which was set up by abolitionist supporters.

During the American Civil War, the Underground Railroad was comprised of a network of safe homes that welcomed fugitives on their trip.

Those who took part were putting their lives in danger by doing so.

The black individuals who took part, whether they were free or fugitives from slavery, ran the chance of being thrown back to slavery.

  1. Numerous abolitionist organizations and religions, including the Society of Friends (Quakers), Congregationalists, Wesleyans, and Reformed Presbyterians; American Indians, former enslaved people, and free blacks were among those who opposed slavery.
  2. The majority of the fugitives fled by foot or on wagons, making their way northward from station to station.
  3. A handful of fugitives were granted sanctuary in Canada.
  4. A few days later, she managed to get away from her owner and seek refuge at the home of another settler.
  5. Pro-slavery forces ultimately tracked her down and transported her back to Lecompton, where they were to receive their prize.
  6. Ann walked into the kitchen to do the dishes.
  7. The gentlemen were preoccupied with eating and drinking.

She had been waiting for this moment for a long time.

She hid among a thicket of bushes.

She stayed there till the next morning.

She had a good view across the prairie.

Ann deduced that he must be a well-educated gentleman.

When she approached the guy, she was cautious since she knew he was Dr.

He promised to pick her up and take her to his house.

Ann crept into the house and lied down softly out of sight.

Barker picked Ann up and took her to Lawrence.

and Mrs.

A big barrel that had been used as a shipping crate could be found in the basement of the Scales’ home.

This provided Ann with a claustrophobic, but more safe, hiding spot.

Scales with household chores.

He had raised approximately $70 and had borrowed a closed carriage as well as a team of mules to get to the event.

John and Ann continued their journey northward toward Holton.

It had not been an easy road to go.

Ann had to leave the safety of the carriage in order to assist John in pushing the carriage out of the muck.

The Kansas Journey is a collection of excerpts.

Kansas Historical Society is the author of this work.

Date of creation: March 2011; date of modification: December 2020. Unless otherwise stated, the author of this article is entirely responsible for the content of this article.

See the Places, Learn the Stories at Underground Railroad Sites in Kansas

The state of Kansas has a long history of involvement in the battle for independence. It is correct to refer to a period in Kansas history when pro-slavery and abolitionist groups came into conflict with one another as “Bleeding Kansas.” In many ways, this period in the state was a forerunner of the Civil War, demonstrating that the choice to abolish slavery on a national scale would almost certainly be made by armed combat. In 1854, when the Kansas Territory was made available for settlement, both abolitionists and pro-slavery pioneers hurried to form the state of Kansas.

  • The true contributions of Kansas began many years before the bloodletting began in earnest.
  • The Underground Railroad was a loosely organized network of routes that originated in the southern United States and brought Freedom Seekers north to anti-slavery areas.
  • Pro-slavery warriors scoured the plains in search of anyone seeking freedom from slavery.
  • Thousands of men, women, and children would gain their freedom as a result of this system in the end.
  • The Freedom’s Frontier National Heritage Area is in charge of managing and promoting the living history.
  • Many factors make a visit to the national heritage region a must-do activity for lay historians and their families, including the following:

Follow an actual route along the Underground Railroad

As it travels from Southeast Kansas towards the northern section of the state, US Highway 75 passes past several historic locations and follows the Lane Trail, which transported Freedom Seekers via Topeka, Holton, and Sabetha before continuing on into Iowa in their quest to reach Canada. In many locations, Kansas was mostly undeveloped and poorly inhabited at the time of the Underground Railroad’s establishment. It might take weeks or even months to reach secure rest spots along the way. Traveling the length of the state from the Southeast corner to the Northeast area gives a sense of the vast distances the Freedom Seekers had to go to reach their destination.

The Ritchie house, which functioned as a station on the Underground Railroad, is regarded to be the city’s oldest residence.

During their journey to other places, such as Constitution Hall, the Ritchie House served as a check-in point for freedom fighters. Constitution Hall functioned as Kansas’ first statehouse and served as a refuge for freedom seekers during the American Revolution.

Meet Unexpected Participants In the Underground Railroad

The history of the Underground Railroad is frequently presented through the eyes of the vocal abolitionists who served as the journey’s trademark conductors, and this is particularly true today. Traveling around Kansas provides tourists with the opportunity to learn about the lives of the unexpected participants. Stops on the Underground Railroad were a mix of well-established sanctuaries and hurriedly constructed halts, according to historians. When going through Kansas, it is impossible not to be inspired by the stories of Kansans who became active participants in the Underground Railroad.

  • To realize that these individuals sacrificed so much for the freedom of others when they themselves were subjected to injustice and inequity is amazing.
  • Located in Kansas, the Quindaro Ruins are a working archaeological site that functioned as a final halt before carrying on to Iowa.
  • Clarina Nichols, a female abolitionist who was the editor of an anti-slavery journal in Quindaro, would go on to become a campaigner for women’s rights after her participation in the Underground Railroad, is a key player in the plot.
  • Because anonymity was essential to the success of the voyage, it might be difficult to unearth stories of heroism among people who attempted to gain control over their lives and the lives of their loved ones.
  • The site was visited by abolitionist John Brown, 11 Freedom Seekers, and a free-born kid, among other guests.
  • In addition to serving as a vital station on the Underground Railroad, Lawrence was also a key player in the state’s anti-slavery movement.
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See, Read, Touch, and Share History

History of the Underground Railroad is frequently presented through the perspective of vocal abolitionists who acted as the journey’s trademark conductors, and this is particularly true today. Traveling around Kansas provides tourists with the opportunity to learn about the lives of those who were not anticipated to be there. Tunnel halts were a mix of well-established sanctuaries and hurriedly constructed encampments along the Underground Railroad. When traveling through Kansas, it is impossible not to be inspired by the stories of Kansans who went on to become active participants in the Underground Railway.

  • To imagine that these individuals sacrificed so much for the freedom of others when they too were subjected to prejudice and inequity is mind-bending.
  • Located in Kansas, the Quindaro Ruins are a working archaeological excavation site that served as a final halt before carrying on to Iowa.
  • In addition to the Freedom Seekers themselves, there is an underrepresented group in the history of the Underground Railroad.
  • At Grover Barnin Lawrence, the tale of the Freedom Seekers is well-known, as is the spot where they were held.

When the names of all individuals are known, it is an uncommon occurrence to see such. Lawrence was a major stop on the Underground Railroad, and the city played a significant part in the state’s anti-slavery resistance movement.

The Underground Railroad Paved The Way for Kansas’ Impact On Civil Rights

Kansas developed a reputation for its strong participation in the Underground Railroad and for its desire to fight for freedom during the American Revolutionary War. As the state’s reputation increased, more and more Freedom Seekers began to flock to Kansas, not just seeking a safe haven from the dangers of the northern states, but also to live in a location where they thought they would be treated with dignity. This migration created the groundwork for the revolutionary changes that happened in Kansas, which led to the state’s rich cultural past, which is still evident today.

  • September is National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Month, and the month of September is dedicated to this cause.
  • Making sense of the past aids in making sense of the present and the future.
  • Johnson continues.
  • “We are still in the process of becoming.” Create an itinerary to explore the Underground Railroad in Kansas by visiting the Freedom’s Frontier website or by downloading the Freedom’s Frontier App, which is available on Google Play and the Apple App Store respectively.

Where history comes alive

‘In the 1830s, a frustrated slave hunter is believed to have observed that his captives had vanished into thin air somewhere around Newport, Indiana,’ according to local legend. According to legend, the slave hunter believed that his captives must have taken a trip on some type of subterranean train that ran beneath the ground. How else could he explain how rapidly his runaways vanished—at the speed of a train—or how softly they traveled—as if they were traveling underground—if he didn’t know what was going on?

  1. There were no tracks or train carriages on the “Underground Railroad.” It did not travel beneath the surface of the ground.
  2. Despite the fact that it was neither underground nor a railroad, it was given this name because its operations were carried out in secret and because railroad terminology was employed in the operation of the system.
  3. Secret chambers, basements, attics, barns, and other structures were used to hide people from prying eyes.
  4. This network of persons and safe homes was in operation east of the Missouri River until the establishment of the Kansas and Nebraska Territories in 1854.
  5. A compromise was negotiated, enabling citizens of the new territory to vote on whether Kansas would become a free or slave state when it became a state in the Union.

This marked the beginning of the time in our nation’s history that is now known as “Bleeding Kansas.” After ruling in the Dred Scott case in 1857, the majority of the Supreme Court of the United States concluded that the principal statute ensuring that slavery would not be allowed to spread into the new territories was unconstitutional on the basis of the Fourteenth Amendment.

  • Following the Scott ruling, the Underground Railroad began a new era of development.
  • It was at this era that the Kansas Underground Railroad had its peak of activity.
  • In 1854, the only roads that existed in the territory were military outposts or branches of the California/Oregon Road and the Santa Fe Trail, both of which passed through the area.
  • Joseph Root and A.
  • Jameson, members of the free state Kansas Central Committee.
  • This was the Kansas leg of a path that began in Iowa City, Iowa and ended in Kansas City, Kansas.
  • When the initial leaders of the Free-State Committee were imprisoned, he rose to the position of leader on the committee.
  • The National Kansas Aid Committee developed an overland route across Iowa, southeastern Nebraska, and into Kansas in order to circumvent the blockade of the Missouri River.
  • The organization was dubbed “Lane’s Army of the North” by the southern press, who characterized them as rabble-rousers.
  • At the time, it was believed that until free state activists took action, Kansas would be lost to the South unless they did something.
  • Consequently, bigger and more visible “trains” were forced to travel a highly roundabout path from Lawrence to southeastern Nebraska, where they were reunited with the main route of the Lane Trail that carried on to Iowa City.

From there, more recognized escape routes were used, which took them via Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Michigan, with the majority of them crossing into Canada at Detroit.

Quindaro Underground Railroad Museum reveals snapshots of Black history in KCK

KANSAS CITY, Kan. — The city of Kansas City is home to the Kansas City Royals. Many people are unaware of Quindaro’s connection to the fabled Underground Railroad that runs through Kansas City, Kan., though many people are aware of Quindaro’s connection to the secret network of routes and safe houses that assisted slaves in their escape to free states during the period leading up to the Civil War. “There’s a lot of history out here in Quindaro, and that’s what I really want people to know about,” Luther Smith, director of the Quindaro Underground Railroad Museum, said.

  1. He is in charge of a collection of artifacts, photographs, and oral histories that provide a valuable snapshot of African-American history in Kansas and the Kansas City region.
  2. Luther Smith is the director of the Quindaro Underground Railroad Museum, which is located in Kansas City, Missouri.
  3. However, upon closer inspection, the museum is everything but.
  4. The Underground Railroad Museum is located in the heart of downtown Philadelphia.
  5. According to him, “these are some of the paths the slaves followed in order to reach to freedom,” and “there is a small circle there that goes right across Kansas.” A station on the subterranean railroad along the Missouri River’s banks was Quindaro, Missouri.
  6. It is now a national historic landmark.
  7. Sarah PlakeThe Quindaro ruins, which overlook the Missouri River, are a popular tourist destination.

“It was truly like a small city,” Smith added.

Freedman University ultimately became Western University, and it was from there that Smith’s mother received her bachelor’s degree.

The Quindaro Ruins site, which contains the last remaining structure of the town, is located just a few blocks away.

Quindaro Ruins is a historic site in Mexico.

In the vicinity of the Quindaro viewpoint, Sarah Plake Plaques have now been put at an overlook, serving as a reminder to people who pass by that such a significant monument was on the verge of being demolished.

Sarah PlakeAt the Quindaro Ruins overlook, informational plaques explain the site’s cultural and historical value to visitors.

The Quindaro lookout point is a popular tourist destination.

It was solely for African-American children that the school was established, and it educated kids from the first through the eighth grades.

While thinking about their lives, Smith says he is motivated to do even more for the museum by their legacies.

Eventually, he would like to convert the museum into a visitor information center.

People have talked about it, and one artist has even created representations of it, but thus yet, nothing has occurred.

However, individual visits with Smith can be arranged by phoning 913-287-9830 when the museum is closed for the majority of the time due to the epidemic.

Scripps Media, Inc. retains ownership of the copyright until 2021. All intellectual property rights are retained. This information may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without the prior written permission of the author.

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The Underground Railroad, a vast network of people who helped fugitive slaves escape to the North and to Canada, was not run by any single organization or person. Rather, it consisted of many individuals – many whites but predominently black – who knew only of the local efforts to aid fugitives and not of the overall operation. Still, it effectively moved hundreds of slaves northward each year – according to one estimate,the South lost 100,000 slaves between 1810 and 1850. An organized system to assist runaway slaves seems to have begun towards the end of the 18th century. In 1786 George Washington complained about how one of his runaway slaves was helped by a “society of Quakers, formed for such purposes.” The system grew, and around 1831 it was dubbed “The Underground Railroad,” after the then emerging steam railroads. The system even used terms used in railroading: the homes and businesses where fugitives would rest and eat were called “stations” and “depots” and were run by “stationmasters,” those who contributed money or goods were “stockholders,” and the “conductor” was responsible for moving fugitives from one station to the next.For the slave, running away to the North was anything but easy. The first step was to escape from the slaveholder. For many slaves, this meant relying on his or her own resources. Sometimes a “conductor,” posing as a slave, would enter a plantation and then guide the runaways northward. The fugitives would move at night. They would generally travel between 10 and 20 miles to the next station, where they would rest and eat, hiding in barns and other out-of-the-way places. While they waited, a message would be sent to the next station to alert its stationmaster.The fugitives would also travel by train and boat – conveyances that sometimes had to be paid for. Money was also needed to improve the appearance of the runaways – a black man, woman, or child in tattered clothes would invariably attract suspicious eyes. This money was donated by individuals and also raised by various groups, including vigilance committees.Vigilance committees sprang up in the larger towns and cities of the North, most prominently in New York, Philadelphia, and Boston. In addition to soliciting money, the organizations provided food, lodging and money, and helped the fugitives settle into a community by helping them find jobs and providing letters of recommendation.The Underground Railroad had many notable participants, including John Fairfield in Ohio, the son of a slaveholding family, who made many daring rescues, Levi Coffin, a Quaker who assisted more than 3,000 slaves, and Harriet Tubman, who made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom.
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Slavery – The Kansas-Nebraska Act & the Underground Railroad

Throughout the century, abolitionists and slaveowners came to blows on a number of occasions. The Missouri Compromise of 1820 was the first attempt to arbitrate between the two parties. It restricted slavery to regions south of the 36 30 latitude line, which was the line dividing the United States in half. It was the legislature’s endeavor to ensure that the two interests were balanced in the United States Senate that resulted in Missouri becoming a slave state and Maine becoming a free state.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act

Many times throughout the course of the century, abolitionists and slave owners came to blows. When the Missouri Compromise of 1820 was ratified by Congress, slavery was restricted to lands south of the 36 30 latitude line, marking the beginning of the first successful attempt to arbitrate between the two. It was the legislature’s endeavor to ensure that the two interests were balanced in the United States Senate that resulted in Missouri being admitted as a slave state and Maine being admitted as a free state.

Slavery In Nebraska

Slavery was a contentious topic at the time of the creation of Nebraska Territory. Unlike in Kansas from 1854-1861, there was no physical and violent fight in Nebraska, but there was a “verbally bloody” conflict. Slavery was not a contentious topic in Nebraska as it had been in Kansas at the time. Slavery, on the other hand, was not formally abolished. Many legislators believed that there was no need for a legislation because it did not exist in Nebraska, while others said that it was a trivial issue that should be left alone without more discussion.

  1. In the 1855 Territorial Census, six slaves were identified in Otoe County as belonging to citizens of Nebraska City, according to the records.
  2. Nuckolls owned five slaves, but Charles A.
  3. The Kansas Territory Census of the same year, however, revealed a total of 192 slaves in the state.
  4. The remaining five slaves were identified in Kearney County, where they were held by a small group of military officers stationed at Fort Kearny.
  5. The sole known slave sale in Nebraska occurred in December 1860 at Nebraska City, according to historical records.
  6. There is an interesting point to make about the fact that by 1860, there were only two slaves registered in Kansas Territory, as opposed to 15 in Nebraska.

The Underground Railroad

A network of passageways bringing slaves north to the free states was known as the Underground Railroad, which connected blacks fleeing slavery in the South over the Ohio River to the North. This massive system spanned from Maine all the way to Nebraska and Kansas, among other places. In spite of the name “underground railroad,” the route was not usually underground; rather, it was a hidden path that passed through woodlands, through fields and across rivers, and which operated frequently at night.

In order to get from one secure spot to the next, slaves were accompanied by “conductors,” who guided them.

Escapees were also provided with food, clothes, and sometimes medical attention in addition to shelter and advice.

Ministers, businesspeople, retailers, and farmers were among those present.

One of the most well-known “conductors” was Harriet Tubman, an escaped slave who could not read nor write and was therefore unable to assist others. She made repeated excursions to the south, where she was able to release around three hundred people from slavery and guide them to freedom.

8 Key Contributors to the Underground Railroad

Isaac Hopper, an abolitionist, is shown in this image from the Kean Collection/Getty Images. As early as 1786, George Washington expressed dissatisfaction with a “organization of Quakers, founded for such reasons,” which had sought to free a neighbor’s slave. Quakers were instrumental in the establishment of the Underground Railroad. Slavery was opposed in especially in Philadelphia, where Isaac Hopper, a Quaker who converted to Christianity, created what has been described as “the first working cell of the abolitionist underground.” Hopper not only protected escaped slave hunters in his own house, but he also constructed a network of safe havens and recruited a web of spies in order to get insight into their plans.

Hopper, a friend of Joseph Bonaparte, the exiled brother of the former French emperor, went to New York City in 1829 and established himself as a successful businessman.

READ MORE: The Underground Railroad and Its Operation

2. John Brown

John Brown, an abolitionist, about 1846 GraphicaArtis/Getty Images courtesy of Similar to his father, John Brown actively participated in the Underground Railroad by hosting runaways at his home and warehouse and organizing an anti-slave catcher militia following the adoption of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850, which he inherited from his father. The next year, he joined several of his sons in the so-called “Bleeding Kansas” war, leading one attack that resulted in the deaths of five pro-slavery settlers in 1856.

Brown’s radicalization continued to grow, and his ultimate act occurred in October 1859, when he and 21 supporters seized the government arsenal in Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia), in an effort to incite a large-scale slave uprising.

3. Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, where she experienced repeated violent beatings, one of which involving a two-pound lead weight, which left her with seizures and migraines for the rest of her life. Tubman fled bondage in 1849, following the North Star on a 100-mile walk into Pennsylvania, fearing she would be sold and separated from her family. She died in the process. She went on to become the most well-known “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, participating in around 13 rescue missions back into Maryland and rescuing at least 70 enslaved individuals, including several of her siblings.

As a scout, spy, and healer for the Union Army, Tubman maintained her anti-slavery activities during the Civil War, and is believed to have been the first woman in the United States to lead troops into battle. Tubman died in 1865. When Harriet Tubman Led a Civil War Raid, You Should Pay Attention

4. Thomas Garrett

She was born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, where she underwent regular violent beatings, including one that involving a two-pound lead weight, which left her with seizures and migraines for the remainder of her life. Afraid that she might be sold and separated from her family, Tubman escaped bondage in 1849, traveling 100 miles through Pennsylvania following the North Star as she did so. She went on to become the most well-known “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, participating in around 13 rescue missions back into Maryland and rescuing at least 70 enslaved persons, including numerous siblings, in the process.

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As a scout, spy, and medic for the Union Army, Tubman maintained her anti-slavery activism during the Civil War, and is believed to have been the first woman in the United States to lead troops into battle.

When Harriet Tubman Led a Civil War Raid, You Should Know About It

5. William Still

William Still is a well-known author and poet. Photograph courtesy of the Hulton Archive/Getty Images Many runaways traveled from Wilmington, the final Underground Railroad station in the slave state of Delaware, to the office of William Still in adjacent Philadelphia, which was the last stop on their journey. The Vigilance Committee of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, which provided food and clothing, coordinated escapes, raised funds, and otherwise served as a one-stop social services shop for hundreds of fugitive slaves each year, was chaired by Still, who was a free-born African American.

Still ultimately produced a book in which he chronicled the personal histories of his guests, which offered valuable insight into the operation of the Underground Railroad as a whole.

His assistance to Osborne Anderson, the only African-American member of John Brown’s company to survive the Harpers Ferry raid, was another occasion when he was called upon.

6. Levi Coffin

Charles T. Webber’s painting The Underground Railroad depicts fleeing slaves Levi Coffin, his wife Catherine, and Hannah Haydock providing assistance to the group of fugitive slaves. Getty Images/Bettina Archive/Getty Images Levi Coffin, often known as the “president of the Underground Railroad,” is said to have been an abolitionist when he was seven years old after witnessing a column of chained slaves people being taken to an auction house. Following a humble beginning delivering food to fugitives holed up on his family’s North Carolina plantation, he rose through the ranks to become a successful trader and prolific “stationmaster,” first in Newport (now Fountain City), Indiana, and subsequently in Cincinnati, Kentucky.

In addition to hosting anti-slavery lectures and abolitionist sewing club meetings, Coffin, like his fellow Quaker Thomas Garrett, stood steadfast when hauled before a court of law.

His writings state that “the dictates of humanity came in direct conflict with the law of the land,” and that “we rejected the law.”

7. Elijah Anderson

An image of Levi Coffin, his wife Catherine, and Hannah Haydock supporting a group of escape slaves appears in The Underground Railroad, a painting by Charles T. Webber. Getty Images/Betty Mann Archive When Levi Coffin was seven years old, he is said to have watched a column of chained enslaved persons being driven to auction, prompting him to become an abolitionist. He is known as the “president of the Underground Railroad.” Following a humble beginning delivering food to fugitives holed up on his family’s North Carolina plantation, he rose through the ranks to become a successful trader and prolific “stationmaster,” first in Newport (now Fountain City), Indiana, and subsequently in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Operating openly, Coffin even organized anti-slavery lectures and abolitionist sewing club gatherings.

His writings said that “the mandates of humanity were in direct conflict with the law of the land,” and that “we rejected the law.”

8. Thaddeus Stevens

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens is an American lawyer and senator. Bettmann Archive courtesy of Getty Images; Matthew Brady/Bettmann Archive Thaddeus Stevens, a representative from Pennsylvania, was outspoken in his opposition to slavery. The 14th and 15th amendments, which guaranteed African-American citizens equal protection under the law and the right to vote, respectively, were among his many accomplishments, and he also advocated for a radical reconstruction of the South, which included the redistribution of land from white plantation owners to former enslaved people.

Despite this, it wasn’t until 2002 that his Underground Railroad activities were brought to light, when archeologists uncovered a hidden hiding hole in the courtyard of his Lancaster house.

Seward, also served as Underground Railroad “stationmasters” during the era.

The Underground Railroad

Thodeus Stevens was an American lawyer and politician. Bettmann Archive courtesy of Getty Images. Photograph by Matthew Brady Thaddeus Stevens, a Pennsylvania lawmaker, was outspoken in his opposition to slavery. The 14th and 15th amendments, which guaranteed African-American citizens equal protection under the law and the right to vote, respectively, were among his many accomplishments, and he also advocated for a radical reconstruction of the South, which included the redistribution of land from white plantation owners to formerly enslaved individuals.

Despite this, it wasn’t until 2002 that his Underground Railroad activities were brought to light, when archeologists found a hidden hiding spot in the courtyard of his Lancaster house.

It has since been discovered that Stevens did, in fact, house runaways, and this has been proven. A number of other notable political individuals, such as novelist and orator Frederick Douglass and Secretary of State William H. Seward, also served as Underground Railroad “stationmasters.”

Home of Levi Coffin

Levi Coffin’s residence in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived as an American Quaker and abolitionist. This was a station on the Underground Railroad, a network of routes, locations, and individuals that assisted enslaved persons in escaping to the North during the Civil War. Cincinnati Museum Center provided the photography. “> During the age of slavery, the Underground Railroad was a network of routes, locations, and individuals that assisted enslaved persons in the American South in escaping to the North, according to the Underground Railroad Museum.

Although it was not a real railroad, it fulfilled the same function as one: it carried passengers across large distances.

The people who worked for the Underground Railroad were driven by a passion for justice and a desire to see slavery abolished—a drive that was so strong that they risked their lives and jeopardized their own freedom in order to assist enslaved people in escaping from bondage and staying safe while traveling the Underground Railroad.

  1. As the network expanded, the railroad metaphor became more prevalent.
  2. In recent years, academic research has revealed that the vast majority of persons who engaged in the Underground Railroad did it on their own, rather than as part of a larger organization.
  3. According to historical tales of the railroad, conductors frequently pretended to be enslaved persons in order to smuggle runaways out of plantation prisons and train stations.
  4. Often, the conductors and passengers traveled 16–19 kilometers (10–20 miles) between each safehouse stop, which was a long distance in this day and age.
  5. Patrols on the lookout for enslaved persons were usually on their tails, chasing them down.
  6. Historians who study the railroad, on the other hand, find it difficult to distinguish between fact and fiction.
  7. Eric Foner is one of the historians that belongs to this group.
  8. Despite this, the Underground Railroad was at the center of the abolitionist struggle during the nineteenth century.
  9. Levi Coffin’s residence in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived as an American Quaker and abolitionist.
  10. Cincinnati Museum Center provided the photography.
  11. Person who is owned by another person or group of people is referred to as an enslaved person.

Slavery is a noun that refers to the act of owning another human being or being owned by another human being (also known as servitude). Abolitionists utilized this nounsystem between 1800 and 1865 to aid enslaved African Americans in their attempts to flee to free states.

Media Credits

With the exception of promotional graphics, which normally link to another page that carries the media credit, all audio, artwork, photos, and videos are attributed beneath the media asset they are associated with. In the case of media, the Rights Holder is the individual or group that gets credited.

Director

Tyson Brown is a member of the National Geographic Society.

Author

The National Geographic Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the exploration of the world’s natural wonders.

Production Managers

Gina Borgia is a member of the National Geographic Society. Jeanna Sullivan is a member of the National Geographic Society.

Program Specialists

According to National Geographic Society’s Sarah Appleton, Margot Willis is a National Geographic Society photographer.

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