In What Grade Is The Underground Railroad Taught? (The answer is found)

Aimed at students in 5th grade, these web based lesson plans tell the compelling story of the Underground Railroad at Hampton National Historic Site (Maryland) and New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park (Massachusetts).

What grade is the Underground Railroad?

The lessons are suitable for grades 4-9. The Anti-Slavery Society of Canada was the last of several short-lived anti-slavery societies in Canada. These societies were part of an international abolitionist movement supported by leading moral thinkers of the day in Britain, Europe and the United States.

What was the Underground Railroad 4th grade?

The Underground Railroad was a term used for a network of people, homes, and hideouts that slaves in the southern United States used to escape to freedom in the Northern United States and Canada.

What was the Underground Railroad book reading level?

ISBN-10: 0395979153. Reading Level: Lexile Reading Level 1240L. Guided Reading Level V.

Why should students learn about the Underground Railroad?

It is a demonstration of how African Americans could organize on their own – dispelling the myth that African Americans did not resist enslavement. It provided an opportunity for sympathetic Americans to assist in the abolition of slavery.

Why do you think it was called the Underground Railroad?

(Actual underground railroads did not exist until 1863.) According to John Rankin, “It was so called because they who took passage on it disappeared from public view as really as if they had gone into the ground. After the fugitive slaves entered a depot on that road no trace of them could be found.

How did Harriet Tubman find out about the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad and Siblings Tubman first encountered the Underground Railroad when she used it to escape slavery herself in 1849. Following a bout of illness and the death of her owner, Tubman decided to escape slavery in Maryland for Philadelphia.

How many slaves did Levi Coffin help escape?

In 1826, he moved to Indiana and over the next 20 years he assisted more than 2,000 enslaved persons escape bondage, so many that his home was known as the “Grand Central Station of the Underground Railroad.”

How do you explain the Underground Railroad to kids?

It went through people’s houses, barns, churches, and businesses. People who worked with the Underground Railroad cared about justice and wanted to end slavery. They risked their lives to help enslaved people escape from bondage, so they could remain safe on the route.

How many slaves did Harriet Tubman free?

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the most well-known of all the Underground Railroad’s “conductors.” During a ten-year span she made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom. And, as she once proudly pointed out to Frederick Douglass, in all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.”

Who was the Underground Railroad book?

The Underground Railroad Records is an 1872 book by William Still, who is known as the Father of the Underground Railroad.

What was the Underground Railroad by Yona Zeldis McDonough publisher?

What Was the Underground Railroad? by Yona Zeldis McDonough – Penguin Books Australia.

What were slaves legally considered?

Legally considered property, slaves were not allowed to own property of their own. They were not allowed to assemble without the presence of a white person. Slaves that lived off the plantation were subject to special curfews.

How many slaves did the Underground Railroad free?

According to some estimates, between 1810 and 1850, the Underground Railroad helped to guide one hundred thousand enslaved people to freedom.

Teach Your Kids About . the Underground Railroad

It was a perilous voyage for slaves fleeing slavery in the southern states as they travelled north on the Underground Railroad, an underground network of people who opposed slavery and assisted the fugitives on their trek to Canada, where they could live free. Please see the list below for more study materials to learn more about this time of history. Lesson Plans are a type of plan that is used to teach a subject.

  • The escape of slaves from the southern states was a perilous voyage as they made their way north on the Underground Railroad — a hidden network of individuals who opposed slavery and assisted the fugitives in their quest to reach Canada, where they might live free lives in freedom. To understand more about this time period in history, check out the resources listed below! Lesson Plans are a type of plan that is used to teach a certain subject matter.

Figures of Influence Harriet Tubman (also known as “Tubman”) was an American woman who lived during the Civil War.

  • “Harriet Tubman” is a fictional character created by author Harriet Tubman in the 1960s.

William Still: I’d want to thank you for your service.

  • The William Still Story, courtesy of Public Broadcasting Service. William Still, an abolitionist, is featured in a video, lesson materials, and other resources.

Various Other Resources

  • Site of John Freeman Wells’s historical significance The Underground Railroad Museum is located in New York City. This museum is located in Puce, Ontario, which served as the subterranean railroad’s terminus. Uncle Tom’s Cabin has an interesting personal tale as well as photographs. Dresden is a town in the province of Ontario. Located on the grounds of the historic site is Rev. Josiah Henson, who served as the inspiration for the novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” On Black History Canada, there is an article about the Underground Railroad. Lists of references and resources from all around the internet
  • Internet Resources for the Underground Railroad on CyberBee– A list of websites and other resources

Although there appears to be a lot of debate on whether quilt codes are true or not, here are some useful resources on the subject regardless of your opinion.

  • Crafting Your Own Quilt Pattern Board Gameby Deceptively Educational – Step-by-step instructions on how to craft your own quilt pattern board game
  • Quilt code patterns– an explanation of the patterns and what they signified
  • Quilt code patterns Quilt patterns and the Underground Railroad: the significance of patterns in history
  • Creating Your Own Secret Quilt Message from Pathways to Freedom is a fun and engaging online activity.
  • Mission US: Mission 2 – Flight to Freedom — an interactive online game in which you take on the role of 14-year-old Lucy King, who is attempting to flee slavery via the Underground Railroad
  • Mission US: Mission 2 – Flight to Freedom The Underground Railroad Interactive Game–a “choose your own adventure” style game in which you determine which steps to follow along your journey north
  • The Underground Railroad Interactive Game The Underground Railroad: Journey to Freedom is an interactive game in the manner of a 3D movie. This handbook is also accessible to educators in grades 6 through 10
  • Create a 3D representation of Harriet Tubman with Crayola Triarama
  • Create an Underground Railroad Lantern using Arkansas Civil War 150
  • And more.

A challenge presented by Ben and Me that will see bloggers publish their way through the alphabet over the course of 26 weeks will include a post on books. The letter U is represented here. Feel free to participate yourself, or simply to see what other people are writing about!

Teaching the Underground Railroad

The author of today’s piece, Roy E. Finkenbine, is an expert on teaching about the Underground Railroad. Dr. Finkenbine is a Professor of History at the University of Detroit Mercy, where he also serves as the Director of the Black Abolitionist Archive. He serves on the Michigan Freedom Trail Commission as a commissioner. Through 2018, he offered an annual summer class on the Underground Railroad, which he began in 2006. *** The Underground Railroad played a vital role in the history of the United States.

  • The Underground Railroad exemplifies how people and groups may collaborate across racial lines in the interest of the larger community.
  • The Michigan social studies standards provide chances for elementary and secondary teachers to engage in this type of activity.
  • This page begins with resources for gaining a general overview of the Underground Railroad and progresses from there.
  • It also explains how to make the most of fiction while avoiding stories that are only based on mythology.

Developing a Background Understanding: Key Secondary Sources

There are several secondary sources that may be used to have a more comprehensive grasp of the Underground Railroad’s history.

  • Among the books on the Underground Railroad are: David W. Blight’s Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in History and Memory (2004)
  • Fergus M. Bordewich’s Bound for Canaan: The Epic Story of the Underground Railroad, America’s First Civil Rights Movement (2006)
  • Carol Mull’s The Underground Railroad in Michigan (2010)
  • Karolyn Smardz Frost and Veta Tucker’s A Fluid Frontier: Slavery, Resistance, and the Underground Railroad in the Detroit River Bordew

Blight, David W., Passages to Freedom: The Underground Railroad in History and Memory(2004); Fergus M. Bordewich, Bound for Canaan: The Epic Story of the Underground Railroad, America’s First Civil Rights Movement(2006); Carol Mull, The Underground Railroad in Michigan(2010); Karolyn Smardz Frost and Veta Tucker, eds., A Fluid Frontier: Slavery, Resistance, and the Underground Railroad in the Detroit River Bordewich, Fergu

  • Authors Keith Griffler’s Front Line of Freedom: African Americans and the Forging of the Underground Railroad in the Ohio Valley (2010) and “Forgotten History of Native Americans Who Helped the Underground Railroad” Time (September 19, 2019) are among those who have written about or researched the Underground Railroad. The Indians of Hungry Hollow, by Bill Dunlop and Marcia Fountain-Blacklidge, is a 2004 book that tells the story of an Odawa oral legend about Native Americans supporting freedom seekers in Michigan.

Engaging Students: Primary Sources

Often, the most effective method to engage kids is to use the words of the people who will be participating. The following are examples of useful one-volume compilations of escaped slave voices:

  • Among the works on the Underground Railroad are Devon W. Carbado and Donald Weise’s The Long Walk to Freedom: Runaway Slave Narratives (2012)
  • Christine Rudisel and Bob Blaisdell’s Slave Narratives of the Underground Railroad (2014)
  • And William Still’s The Underground Railroad (1872), which is based on his interviews with freedom seekers passing through Philadelphia. In addition to the first edition, it is also available in a variety of reprint versions

In collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a vast collection of slave narratives has been made available online. You may get to them by visiting to the “North American Slave Narratives” page and clicking on them. There are digitized versions of virtually all of the book-length memoirs of previously enslaved individuals, as well as the accounts of their escapes, available in this collection. Of course, the opinions of Underground Railroad activists are both intriguing and informative.

  • It is fascinating to read and works well with students of all ages
  • Reminiscences of Levi Coffin(1876), the autobiography of a major Indiana activist, discusses his work in assisting runaways throughout the Midwest
  • Stuart Seely Sprague, ed.,His Promised Land(1996), the autobiography of John P. Parker at Ripley on the Ohio River, is riveting to read and works well with students of all ages
  • Consider the writings of Detroiters William Lambert and George DeBaptiste, whose post-Civil War reminiscences can be found at the Central Michigan University Clarke Historical Library:

Fiction and Mythology

In order to educate kids to the Underground Railroad, there are several fictional works, including novels, that may be used successfully. One of the greatest is Patricia Polacco’s January’s Sparrow, which is available on Amazon (2009). The story is based on the true story of the Crosswhite family from Marshall, Michigan, however it has been romanticized. It is intended for children between the ages of 8 and 12. Unfortunately, some authors have released works over the course of the last few decades that have helped to promote falsehoods about the Underground Railroad and its participants.

According to Scholastic’s website, they have put together a decent collection of Underground Railroad misconceptions (as well as the counter-evidence).

See also:  Underground Railroad When Did It Start? (Solution)

Geography of the Underground Railroad

Geographical factors had a significant part in the Underground Railroad, and this is being increasingly recognized. Cheryl LaRoche’sFree Black Communities and the Underground Railroad: The Geography of Resistance(2014) is an excellent resource that stresses the critical role played by free black communities throughout the Underground Railroad era of the American Civil War. You may find a handy reproducible map of the Underground Railroad, created by National Geographic, at the following link: ***I strongly encourage you to look for methods to include the tale of the Underground Railroad into your classroom instruction.

Teaching the Underground Railroad

In the United States of America’s history, the Underground Railroad operated during one of the most difficult periods in the country’s history. A dramatic episode involving freedom seekers travelling toward the northern United States and into Canada is depicted. Even though the Underground Railroad’s influence on freedom seekers and members of the Underground Railroad is well documented, the Underground Railroad’s long-term consequences after the Emancipation Proclamation are rarely discussed.

  • Thousands of ordinary men and women of many ethnicities, faiths, and beliefs joined together to demand social justice, making it one of the most multicultural collaborative events and demonstrations in the history of the United States.
  • It gave a chance for sympathizing Americans to contribute to the abolition of slavery in the United States.
  • To learn more about the significance of the Underground Railroad, listen to Dr.
  • Wright Museum of African American History/documentaries).
  • By selecting the resources mentioned under each topic, you may learn more about each of the subjects listed below. Make a list of the events and make a note of how they are connected to one another. Consider the dates of important events in your life in particular. After going over these events, you should be able to construct a more comprehensive picture of the Underground Railroad’s efforts. It should become clear how these occurrences are related to one another and what they mean
  • Use some type of technology to illustrate the link between these events and the Underground Railroad (e.g., word cloud, idea map—which requires basic membership to save) to illustrate the relationship between these events and the Underground Railroad.

“Before I arrived to this session, I was under the impression that I was well-versed in the fundamentals of this tough period in our history. Slaves and historical figures such as Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass are well-known to us. What I didn’t realize at the time was that there was a lot more to the Underground Railroad than the minimal facts I had gleaned through my schooling.” Summer 2013 Reflection by a University Student

  • “In my mind, I had mastered the fundamentals of this terrible period in our nation’s history before to enrolling in this class. I was wrong. People like Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass are well-known to us, as are slaves and other historical figures like them. However, what I didn’t realize at the time was that there was a great deal more to the Underground Railroad than the minimal facts I had gleaned in school.” This is a summer 2013 student reflection.
  • Aboard the Underground Railroad: The British Fort
  • Florida’s Underground Railroad – Part 3
  • Rebellion: John Horse and the Black Seminoles
  • Black Seminoles
  • The Freedom Seeker
  • Aboard the Underground Railroad: The British Fort

“My amazement at learning how crucial Michigan and the Detroit region were in the Underground Railroad’s operations came as a surprise. Not even aware that Battle Creek served as a staging area for slaves attempting to escape to Canada.” Summer 2013 Reflection by a University Student Women’s Empowerment

  • The Underground Railroad Connection
  • Women in the Abolitionist Movement
  • The Underground Railroad Timeline
  • The Underground Railroad Connection

Summary

By taking a more comprehensive view of the Underground Railroad, we may have a greater understanding of not just why this event was so crucial historically, but also how it continues to be significant in contemporary times. By connecting historical events together, you will be able to present students with a more thorough understanding of the Underground Railroad and the history of the Abolitionist Movement than you would otherwise be able to. Following that, you will learn how to create high-quality lesson plans by employing a multicultural perspective.

Eastern Illinois University : Teaching with Primary Sources

However, many of the intriguing and lesser known elements of the Underground Railroad are not included in many textbooks, despite the fact that it is an essential part of our nation’s history. It is intended that this booklet will serve as a window into the past by presenting a number of original documents pertaining to the Underground Railroad. Broadsides, prize posters, newspaper clippings, historical records, sheet music, pictures, and memoirs connected to the Underground Railroad are among the primary sources included in this collection.

  1. The Underground Railroad was a covert structure established to assist fugitive slaves on their journey to freedom in the United States.
  2. As a result, secret codes were developed to aid in the protection of themselves and their purpose.
  3. Runaway slaves were referred to as cargo, and the free persons who assisted them on their journey to freedom were referred to as conductors.
  4. These stations would be identified by a lantern that was lighted and hung outside.

A Dangerous Path to Freedom

However, many of the intriguing and lesser known elements of the Underground Railroad are not included in many textbooks, despite the fact that it is a vital part of our country’s history. This pamphlet will give a glimpse into the past through a range of primary documents pertaining to the Underground Railroad, which will be discussed in detail. Broadsides, prize posters, newspaper clippings, historical records, sheet music, pictures, and memoirs relating to the Underground Railroad are among the primary sources included in this collection.

The Underground Railroad was a covert structure established to assist fugitive slaves on their journey to freedom in the American Civil War.

Consequently, secret codes were developed to assist them in protecting themselves and their purpose.

It was the conductors that assisted escaped slaves in their journey to freedom, and the fugitive slaves were known as cargo when they were transported.

On the Underground Railroad, safe homes that were utilized as hiding places were referred to as “stations.” Outside each station would be a lamp that was illuminated.

ConductorsAbolitionists

However, many of the intriguing and lesser known elements of the Underground Railroad are not included inside many textbooks, despite the fact that it is a vital part of our nation’s history. This ebook will give a look into the past through a range of primary documents pertaining to the Underground Railroad. Broadsides, prize posters, newspaper clippings, historical records, sheet music, pictures, and memoirs relating to the Underground Railroad are among the primary sources included in this collection.

  1. The Underground Railroad was a covert structure designed to assist fugitive slaves on their journey to freedom in the American Civil War.
  2. As a result, secret codes were developed to assist them in protecting themselves and their purpose.
  3. Runaway slaves were referred to as cargo, and the free people who assisted them on their journey to freedom were referred to as conductors.
  4. These stations would be identified by a lighted lantern placed outside.

Efforts of Abolitionists Telling Their Story:Fugitive Slave Narratives

Henry Bibb was born into slavery in Kentucky in the year 1815, and he was the son of a slave owner. After several failed efforts to emancipate himself from slavery, he maintained the strength and persistence to continue his struggle for freedom despite being captured and imprisoned numerous times. His determination paid off when he was able to successfully escape to the northern states and then on to Canada with the assistance of the Underground Railroad, which had been highly anticipated. The following is an excerpt from his tale, in which he detailed one of his numerous escapes and the difficulties he faced as a result of his efforts.

  • I began making preparations for the potentially lethal experiment of breading the shackles that tied me as a slave as soon as the clock struck twelve.
  • On the twenty-fifth of December, 1837, the long-awaited day had finally arrived when I would put into effect my previous determination, which was to flee for Liberty or accept death as a slave, as I had previously stated.
  • It took every ounce of moral strength I have to keep my emotions under control as I said goodbye to my small family.
  • Despite the fact that every incentive was extended to me in order to flee if I want to be free, and the call of liberty was booming in my own spirit, ‘Be free, oh, man!
  • I was up against a slew of hurdles that had gathered around my mind, attempting to bind my wounded soul, which was still imprisoned in the dark prison of mental degeneration.
  • Furthermore, the danger of being killed or arrested and deported to the far South, where I would be forced to spend the rest of my days in hopeless bondage on a cotton or sugar plantation, all conspired to discourage me.
  • The moment has come for me to follow through on my commitment.
  • This marked the beginning of the construction of what was known as the underground rail route to Canada.

For nearly forty-eight hours, I pushed myself to complete my journey without food or rest, battling against external difficulties that no one who has never experienced them can comprehend: “not knowing when I might be captured while traveling among strangers, through cold and fear, braving the north winds while wearing only a thin layer of clothing, pelted by snow storms through the dark hours of the night, and not a single house in which I could enter to protect me from the storm.” This is merely one of several accounts penned by runaway slaves who were on the run from their masters.

Sojourner Truth was another former slave who became well-known for her work to bring slavery to an end.

Green and many others, including Josiah Henson, authored autobiographies in which they described their own personal experiences.

Perhaps a large number of escaped slaves opted to write down their experiences in order to assist people better comprehend their struggles and tribulations; or perhaps they did so in order to help folks learn from the mistakes of the past in order to create a better future for themselves.

William Still and the Underground Railroad Lesson Plan · William Still: An African-American Abolitionist

In this section, students will be requested to evaluate primary source texts that have been presented to them, as well as the viewpoints and historical background of the time period in which they live. 8.1.9.C.D:i. 8:3.9.D:i. Students will analyze how conflict and cooperation among people and organizations have influenced the growth and development of the United States. II. 8.3.9.D:ii OBJECTIVE It is expected that students would apply their understanding of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 in order to explain how Africans, both free and enslaved, managed their lives in a slave society.

  1. Students will also assess the role of the participants in the abolitionist movement in Philadelphia from the eighteenth century onward in order to track the growth of African Americans in their quest for freedom in the United States.
  2. As part of their efforts to remove slavery, students will assess the operations of Underground Railroad agents and abolitionists in the City of Philadelphia, as well as the impact of their activities on the state and national levels.
  3. A discussion and formulation of personal perspectives regarding the acts of people who participated in the Underground Railroad, as well as other African forms of resistance to slavery, will take place in this class.
  4. Materials include:a)Textbook Chapter 8: Let Your Motto Be Resistance, 1833-1850b)Assigned papers from theLinksontheInterneta) Website dedicated to William Still, an African American abolitionist.
  5. IV.
  6. Warm-up exercise – Explain to pupils that they will not be allowed to return home or communicate with their families and friends again, and that they will be sold to the highest bidder to work involuntarily for no compensation.
  7. iii.
See also:  How Much Of The Underground Railroad Is True? (TOP 5 Tips)

iv.

v.

V.

i.

The Life in Philadelphia series.

3.Advertisements for Runaway Slaves ii.

2.The Odyssey of Solomon Northrup VI.

They will be informed that there are laws in place that declare that they have no rights and that they must accept their position as slaves for the remainder of their natural life.

They are unable to possess property or provide testimony in court.

They are unable to perform religious services in the absence of a white present.

They are unable to travel unless given permission by their owner.

They are unable to get married.

Students should first talk about their thoughts about their position and the limits with a partner, and then they should talk about it as a group.

What was their attitude toward their current situation, and were they ready to accept it?

Examine slave advertising and tales with your pupils and ask them to examine them.

The instructor will read first-person narratives from William Still’s The Underground Railroad, which is set in the United States.

A mini-lecture on William Still, regarded as the “Father of the Underground Railroad,” will be delivered by the teacher following this.

What factors contributed to the institution of slavery remaining lawful in America for over 250 years?

What social, political, or economic circumstances made it possible for this to take place?

After reading through their main source paper, students should be able to answer the following questions as a group and report their results to the rest of the class; The publication date of this document is unknown.

3.For whom was this text written, and for what purpose?

5.Can you tell me why you believe the paper was created?

Seventh, what do you think this document tells you about American life at the time it was written?

Solon Northrup, a member of Group 11, is kidnapped and sold into slavery in the year 18412.

In 18414, Frederick Douglass begins his abolitionist, writer, and public speaker career, among other things.

In 1843, Sojourner Truth begins his abolitionist mission.

Group 21.

Dred Scott filed a lawsuit in the year 18473, requesting his release.

Harriet Tubman manages to elude enslavement and make her way to Philadelphia in 18495.

Group Number Thirty-One.

The Compromise of 18503 is passed by the United States Congress.

The novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, was first published in 18525.

Delany was published in 18526.

Group No.

In 18532, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper relocates to the city of Philadelphia.

In 18544, the Benjamin Banneker Institute is established in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The Kansas-Nebraska Act, 1854VI, is approved by the United States Congress and President Franklin Pierce.

In addition, students learned how to collaborate with one another and present their results as a group after reading newspaper clippings from a historical event.

In order to appreciate how the legality of slavery influenced African resistance to slavery in the judicial systems at the state and federal levels, students must first understand what slavery was.

the battle for “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” by the world’s first large free Black population in the decades preceding and leading up to the American Civil War f)At the conclusion of the session, the instructor will ask the students to write down on a piece of paper one information they learnt today and one question they have about what they have discussed and completed in class as they are leaving.

VII.

The students will be invited to submit a letter to the City Council asking reform after the William Still and Black Life in 19th Century Philadelphia course, as if they were actually living in Philadelphia at the time.

The School District of Philadelphia uses this textbook as a teaching tool. African-American History, edited by Darlene Clark Hine, William C. Hine, and Stanley Harrold, published by Pearson Education, Inc., Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey, in 2006.

Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad

Description in succinct form This lesson contains a treasure hunt on the Internet, a quick read-aloud tale, and a number of supplementary exercises. Objectives Students will be able to (depending on their grade level)

  • Researching data about Harriet Tubman on the Internet will help you to improve your computer literacy abilities. discover the ways in which Harriet’s upbringing shaped her future
  • Learn about the passengers on the Underground Railroad and the people who assisted them by studying source materials, such as objects from the Underground Railroad Museum

Abolitionist, Harriet Tubman, and the Underground Railroad are some of the keywords associated with this article. Materials that will be required

  • Writing paper and construction paper, as well as a computer and a scavenger hunt work sheet (with content given).

Lesson to be Learned The materials listed below are some of the ones I’ve used to educate kids about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad throughout the years. The brief reading below is one I wrote for kids, and it focuses on lessons Harriet gained as a little girl that she was able to use in her later years of life. Share this little story with your students; you may use it as a listening exercise or a conversation starter. Following the reading, you may have each kid to write a brief essay about something he or she has learned from an adult that he or she believes will be useful to them when they become adults.

  • Harriet Tubman, whose given name was Araminta Ross, possessed a powerful spirit.
  • He had no idea that the teachings he taught tiny Araminta would one day lead to her being a conductor on the Underground Railroad, something he had no way of knowing.
  • Harriet’s mother and father used to tell her numerous stories when she was a little child.
  • They also whispered legends of an unique train without tracks, dubbed the “underground railroad,” that may be able to assist her in escaping to safety.
  • Harriet and her father trained how to walk about in the brush without making any noise when they were together.
  • During the journey, he demonstrated to Harriet how to utilize medicinal plants such as the water lily, crane’s bill plant leaves, and the back of the hemlock to treat her if she were ill or wounded.
  • If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected].
  • Harriet was informed by Pa that the North Star would direct her to the North and to the protection of the North.
  • Harriet was an excellent student.
  • Harriet Tubman is a historical figure.

Students will use the Web resources mentioned below to answer the question(s) that appear directly below each one of the resources listed below.

  1. Harriet Tubman’s Place in American History /cgi-bin/page.cgi/aa/activists/tubman/youth 1 What was Harriet Tubman’s given name when she was born? What was her family composition in terms of brothers and sisters? Is there something that happened that caused Harriet to have seizures for the remainder of her life? What a variety of activities did Harriet Tubman participate in during the Civil War. Answers: Araminta Ross was Harriet’s maiden name. She was the eldest of eleven children. (She was the youngest of ten brothers and sisters.) While attempting to strike another slave with a hefty iron weight, her overseer accidentally injured Harriet instead. Harriet served the Union as a cook, spy, scout, and nurse throughout the Civil War. Biographies of the Spectrum: Harriet Tubman’s inauguration What prompted Harriet to decide to quit the Brodas plantation and pursue her own independence from the government? Who is the one and only person she has informed of her intentions? Answers: Harriet discovered that a large number of slaves were being auctioned, and that she was one among them. She explained to her sister that Africans in America face a number of challenges. Harriet Tubman’s inauguration How many people have heard Harriet brag about how she “never lost a single passenger” on all of her journeys? Which city did Harriet choose to call home after gaining her independence? Who were the first passengers on Harriet’s “underground railroad” and how did they meet? What was the monetary prize for apprehending Harriet Tubman at one point in time? Frederick Douglass is the answer. She made her home in the Pennsylvania city of Philadelphia. On her first journey, she returned with her sister and her family, and this was her second trip. There was a $40,000 prize for her capture, and the History Channel and Biography.com both published accounts of her capture. Harriet Tubman’s inauguration What were the two most crucial factors in Harriet Tubman’s ability to persevere? Answer: Harriet Tubman was constantly armed with a pistol and had confidence in God
  2. Visit the National Women’s History Project’s Harriet Tubman biography at tlp/biographies/tubman/tubman bio.html for more information. Learn the answers to the following questions by studying the timeline: Who was it that Harriet Tubman collaborated with to prepare the raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia, in 1858? In which year did Harriet go on the first of her 19 visits to the South to assist in the emancipation of slaves? Answers: Despite the fact that she was unable to participate on that particular day, she collaborated with abolitionist John Brown. Harriet embarked on her first journey in 1850. Harriet Tubman’s Biography may be found at How many slaves did Harriet Tubman release and convey to safety? Harriet was responsible for the liberation of 300 individuals.

Harriet Tubman and the American Dream /cgi-bin/page.cgi/aa/activists/tubman/youth 1 What was the given name of Harriet Tubman? What was her family structure like? How many brothers and sisters had she? Harriet will have seizures for the rest of her life. What happened to cause this to happen? Was Harriet Tubman involved in a variety of activities throughout the Civil War period? Answers: Araminta Ross was Harriet’s maiden name before her marriage. A total of eleven children were raised by her mother and father.

  1. As a Union chef, spy, scout and nurse, Harriet served her country with distinction.
  2. The only person who knows about her intentions is the one she told first.
  3. “Africans in America,” she explained to her sister.
  4. In which city did Harriet settle after gaining her independence?
  5. What was the monetary prize for apprehending Harriet Tubman at one point in her career?
  6. She made her home in the Pennsylvania city of Philadelph.
  7. History Channel and Biography.com both published stories on her capture, which resulted in a $40,000 prize.
  8. tlp/biographies/tubman/tubman bio.html; National Women’s History Project: Harriet Tubman (bio.html); National Women’s History Project: Harriet Tubman (http://www.tlp.org).
  9. Harriet’s first of 19 visits to the South to assist in bringing slaves to freedom took place in the year in which she was born.
  10. It was in 1850 when Harriet embarked on her maiden voyage.
  11. Over 300 individuals were freed because to Harriet Tubman.
  • Assume you are a fugitive slave who is escaping to freedom with Harriet Tubman’s assistance. What exactly are your thoughts? Where did things go wrong along the way? • Give an example of a day in your road to freedom
  • Consider the words and phrases that best characterize Harriet Tubman’s persona and character. Then write a description of Harriet Tubman using each of the letters of her given name. List three characteristics that start with the letter H, one that starts with the letter A, and one that starts with the letter R. Visit the National Underground Railroad Museumwebsite for more information. Learn three facts about the Underground Railroad that you may use to create a poster about it. Put your knowledge of Harriet Tubman to good use by creating a fictional interview with her. Fill in the blanks with thoughtful questions and informative responses that demonstrate what you have learnt about her. Consider the following question: During your several travels to free slaves, you had to be on the lookout for slave catchers and their dogs that were tracking you down. It was sometimes necessary to employ devious tactics in order to evade capture. Would you be willing to share one of your most memorable getaways?
See also:  What Direction Did Most Underground Railroad Routes Go? (Solution)

In response to that last question, the following are some possible stories that might be included in the response:

  • Harriet was once caught stealing the buggy of a slave owner. Harriet and her passengers went straight by several slave catchers who had no idea that fugitive slaves would try to escape with their owner’s buggy
  • At one point, slave catchers were within striking distance of Harriet and her passengers. An image of her was placed on a wanted poster at a railroad station where she was waiting. Because she was unable to read, she overheard men discussing the billboard and wondering if Harriet was the lady they were hoping to apprehend in exchange for a prize. It was then that the slave hunters passed her by, forcing her to open a book she had been carrying – praying she wasn’t holding it upside down because she couldn’t see the contents. Once, disguised as an old lady with two chickens tied to her waist, Tubman was marching straight toward a plantation owner who had previously owned her
  • One of the men claimed she couldn’t be Tubman because the poster stated she couldn’t read or write
  • After realizing that she couldn’t get away without calling attention to herself, she hurriedly freed the chickens from her waistband and began yelling at them as they fled away from the scene. Harriet was traveling north by train when she heard others calling her name, and she followed suit. On the train, there was also a placard with the words “wanted.” Harriet exited the train at the next station and boarded the next train heading south, reasoning that no one would suspect her of being a fugitive if she traveled that direction.

Excellent reading materials about Harriet Tubman may be found here.

  • Escape North: The Story of Harriet Tubmanby Monica Kulling
  • Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroadby Ann Poetry
  • Harriet Tubman by Sam and Beryl Epstein
  • Harriet Tubman by Monica Kulling
  • Harriet Tubman by Monica Ku

escape north by Monica Kulling; Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroad by Ann Poetry; Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroad by Sam and Beryl Epstein; Harriet Tubman by Sam and Beryl Epstein; Harriet Tubman by Monica Kulling; Harriet Tubman by Monica Kulling; Harriet Tubman by Monica Kulling; Harriet Tubman by Monica Kulling; Harriet Tubman by Monica Kulling; Escape North by Monica Kulling;

Underground Railroad – Teachers (U.S. National Park Service)

The Upper Elementary level includes students in third through fifth grades. Subjects include: Literacy & Language Arts, Social Studies, and others. 60 minutes are allotted for this lesson. Thinking Capabilities: Understanding: Recognize the essential concept of content that has been heard, viewed, or read. Put the concepts into your own words and interpret or summarize them. Analyzing entails breaking down a thought or idea into its constituent elements and demonstrating the links between those parts.

Standards and criteria should be used to support and validate beliefs and viewpoints.

Objective

The Upper Elementary level includes students in third through fifth grade. Literary and Language Arts, Social Studies are some of the subjects available. 60 minutes are allotted for the lesson. Capacity for Critical Thinking: Recognize the primary concept of content that has been heard, watched, or read. Put the concepts into your own words and explain them or summarize them. Breaking down a topic or idea into components and demonstrating the links between the parts is called analytic thinking.

To support your beliefs and viewpoints, use standards and criteria.

Materials

Upper Elementary (third through fifth grades): Subjects include: Literacy & Language Arts, Social Studies, and Science. The lesson will last 60 minutes. Ability to Reason: Understanding: Recognize and comprehend the essential concept of something heard, watched, or read. In your own words, interpret or summarize the themes. Analyzing entails breaking down a thought or idea into its constituent pieces and demonstrating the links between the constituent parts. Making educated decisions regarding the value of ideas or materials is what evaluating is all about.

Lesson Hook/Preview

Students will study slavery, the Civil War, the Underground Railroad, the C O Canal, and how all of these themes intertwine with one another in this course. In this lesson, they will learn about the notion of freedom as well as the symbolism associated with it.

Procedure

  1. An overview of African American engagement on the C O Canal will be provided by the Rangers.
  • The construction of the C O Canal began as a fantasy of transit to Western riches. The canal, which was in operation for about 100 years, provided a lifeline for villages along the Potomac River as coal, timber, and agricultural products were transported down the river to market. It ran from Georgetown, Washington, DC, and Cumberland, Maryland, for a total distance of 184.5 miles, throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth century. It was given the name C O because it was originally supposed to go all the way to the Ohio River, but it was diverted to Cumberland since it was more expensive and took longer to complete than projected. This ancient waterway continues to serve as a gateway to finding historical, ecological, and recreational riches. Construction on the C O canal began in 1828 and was finished in 1850. During that time period, the canal was mostly constructed by Irish immigrants and indentured servants, while some enslaved individuals did assist in the construction of the canal. Our knowledge of this is based on letters requesting payment for services and 12 newspaper advertising (show students the images). In this way, African Americans were active in the canal by contributing to its construction and by fleeing along its length as part of the Underground Railroad (which you will learn more about today). At some point, there were African American boat captains and workmen who worked on restoring and reconstructing the canal in the 1930s and 1940s. Nonetheless, for the time being, we will concentrate on the years 1830s, 1840s, and 1850s. Show students photographs of African Americans who have worked on the canal, as well as photographs of the canal itself.

The construction of the C O Canal began as a fantasy of transit to Western prosperity for the Spanish and Portuguese. Because of the canal’s lengthy history of operation, towns along the Potomac River have relied on it for than a century to transport coal, timber, and agricultural supplies. It ran from Georgetown, Washington, DC, and Cumberland, Maryland, for a total distance of 184.5 miles, between the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. It was given the name C O because it was originally supposed to go all the way to the Ohio River, but it was diverted to Cumberland since it was more expensive and took longer to complete than anticipated.

  • Construction on the canal began in 1828 and was finished by the year 1850.
  • Several letters for payment of services and twelve newspaper advertising have provided evidence of this conclusion (show students the images).
  • African American boat captains and workers were eventually recruited to restore and rebuild the canal throughout the 1930s and 1940s.
  • Students should be shown photographs of African Americans who have worked on the canal, as well as photographs of the canal itself.
  1. Make certain that children understand that the Ohio River is located near Pittsburgh and that it was originally designed to connect Washington, DC, and Pittsburgh.

Check with the pupils to see if they have any previous information and to make sure they understand the timeframe.

  • Educate students about the distinction between enslaved and indentured laborers. Inquire of pupils about what was going on throughout the 1830s to 1850s and what transpired after that. Is this a time period prior to the American Civil War? What exactly was the American Civil War? Who was involved in the battle? What was it that they were fighting for?

Introduce James Curry is a professional basketball player (man born in slavery in the south whose father was a free man, he always dreamed of freedom in his life and eventually he escaped) During the lesson, the teacher or ranger will read an excerpt from James Curry’s tale in order to assist students have a better understanding of what slavery was like and why someone would want for freedom (excerpt below).

  • Students will read aloud and then follow along with their own copy of the text.
  • As students propose ideas, the instructor will write them down on a whiteboard so that the entire class can see what they are (alternatively students could write their answer on a post it note then put them up).
  • The teacher will explain that enslaved persons frequently attempted to flee, but were quickly apprehended and harshly punished, leading to the establishment of the Underground Railroad.
  • (See also: What would be waiting for them at the end of the towpath if they were able to make it to the other side?
  • Inform pupils that their plans are excellent and that they have arrived at their destination.
  • If you have the opportunity, participate in the freedom quilt activity.
  • Describe how slaves sometimes produced quilts with instructions on where to go and how to escape in order to aid the Underground Railroad (include photographs). For example, teachers may ask students to think together about what symbols may have appeared on freedom quilts that represented freedom. Teachers will demonstrate the many designs that were utilized on Freedom Quilts, as well as explain what each pattern represented. (Really Good Stuff handout, which I am unable to locate.) Students will use the worksheet supplied to create a quilt to commemorate their country’s independence. Students will make a list of the symbols they used on their quilt and what they signify to them and escaped enslaved people
  • And If you have the opportunity, bring everyone back together and have them explain their designs and what freedom means to them.

Assignments such as “Civil War Dilemma” or “Underground Railroad Situations” might be given as homework or as post-activity assignments.

Vocabulary

Canal: a man-made canal that is frequently utilized to transport products and people. Boat lifts and lowering devices are used on river and canal canals to transport boats between sections of water with varying amounts of depth. In the lockhouse, the lock tender and his family resided in a house placed on the canal close to the lock. Lockkeeper: An employee of the C O Canal who is responsible for operating the lift lock. When working on the canal, a lock key is a tool that is used to open and close the wicket paddles at the bottom of a lock door, enabling water to enter and depart the lock.

Navigate: to go by water is to navigate.

the act of transporting something from one location to anotherThe Civil War was a conflict that occurred in the United States between the Northern and Southern states from 1860-1865 over the subject of slavery.

Slavery is defined as the act of one person “owning” another person, such as through property ownership. The Underground Railroad was a covert network of places and individuals that assisted slaves in their attempts to escape from slavery in the South and find freedom in Canada.

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