Name Of A Ridge Near Ripley Ohio Where The Underground Railroad Housed People? (Solution)

Rankin is credited with helping thousands of slaves escape to freedom. The Rankin House was an important stop on the Underground Railroad. It is located in Ripley, Ohio, and the home currently is a museum operated by the Ohio History Connection.

Where was the Underground Railroad in Ohio?

The main entry point to Ohio was along the Ohio River and most notably was a small community called Ripley where John Rankin and a small group assisted 1000s of escaping slaves and started them on their journey on the Underground Railroad.

Where was the Underground Railroad in northwest Ohio?

This Underground Railroad work was done in the heart of the Great Black Swamp of northern Ohio where travel was difficult and dangerous.

Where were the people in the Underground Railroad headed?

These were called “stations,” “safe houses,” and “depots.” The people operating them were called “stationmasters.” There were many well-used routes stretching west through Ohio to Indiana and Iowa. Others headed north through Pennsylvania and into New England or through Detroit on their way to Canada.

What were the homes and barns where slaves stayed along the Underground Railroad called?

In keeping with that name for the system, homes and businesses that harbored runaways were known as “ stations” or “depots” and were run by “stationmasters.” “Conductors” moved the fugitives from one station to the next.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

Were there slaves in Ohio?

Slavery was abolished in Ohio in 1802 by the state’s original constitution. When Virginian John Randolph’s 518 slaves were emancipated and a plan arose to settle them in southern Ohio, the population rose up in indignation.

What was the Ohio Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was a system of safe houses and hiding places that helped freedom seekers along their journey to freedom in Canada, Mexico, and elsewhere outside of the United States. White and African-American “conductors” served as guides from place to place for freedom seekers.

Why did slaves go to the Ohio River?

For many enslaved people the Ohio River was more than a body of water. Crossing it was a huge step on the path to freedom. Serving as natural border between free and slave states, individuals opposed to slavery set up a network of safe houses to assist escaped slaves seeking freedom.

How many Underground Railroad stops in Ohio?

According to research done by the Friends of Freedom Society, there are well over 20 documented Underground Railroad sites in Columbus, but since many of those are private homes, the addresses have not been made public.

Were quilts used in the Underground Railroad?

Two historians say African American slaves may have used a quilt code to navigate the Underground Railroad. Quilts with patterns named “wagon wheel,” “tumbling blocks,” and “bear’s paw” appear to have contained secret messages that helped direct slaves to freedom, the pair claim.

What happened to Cesar in the Underground Railroad?

While the show doesn’t show us what happens after their encounter, Caesar comes to Cora in a dream later, confirming to viewers that he was killed. In the novel, Caesar faces a similar fate of being killed following his capture, though instead of Ridgeway and Homer, he is killed by an angry mob.

What were safe houses in the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. The safe houses used as hiding places along the lines of the Underground Railroad were called stations. A lit lantern hung outside would identify these stations.

What year does Underground Railroad take place?

The Underground Railroad takes place around 1850, the year of the Fugitive Slave Act’s passage. It makes explicit mention of the draconian legislation, which sought to ensnare runaways who’d settled in free states and inflict harsh punishments on those who assisted escapees.

What areas of New York were apart of the Underground Railroad?

9 Incredible Places Around New York That Were Once Part Of The Underground Railroad

  • Starr Clark Tin Shop – Mexico.
  • Lewiston – Niagara County.
  • John Brown Farm Historic Site – Lake Placid.
  • Mother AME Zion Church – New York City.
  • Rogues Harbor Inn – Lansing.
  • Murphy Orchards – Burt.
  • Mission Restaurant – Syracuse.
  • St.

John Rankin House (Ripley, Ohio) – Wikipedia

John Rankin House
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
U.S. National Historic Landmark
Location 6152 Rankin Hill Rd.,Ripley, Ohio
Coordinates 38°45′4″N83°50′32″W / 38.75111°N 83.84222°WCoordinates:38°45′4″N83°50′32″W / 38.75111°N 83.84222°W
Area 20 acres (8.1 ha)
Built 1828
NRHP referenceNo. 70000485
Significant dates
Added to NRHP November 10, 1970
Designated NHL February 18, 1997

The John Rankin Home, located at 6152 Rankin Hill Road in Ripley, Ohio, is a historic house museum. It was built in 1828 and served as the residence of Presbyterian abolitionist John Rankin, as well as one of the first sites on the Underground Railroad. The visit of Harriet Beecher Stowe to Rankin provided inspiration for part of the narrative that became Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The mansion, which was purchased by the state of Ohio in 1938, is currently administered by the Ohio History Connection and is accessible for public visits on a daily basis.

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Description and history

Located on top of a hill overlooking the town of Ripley and the Ohio River, the John Rankin House is a popular destination for visitors. On approximately 20 acres (8.1 hectares), it is accessible through a road and visitors center located off Rankin Hill Road (County Road 556). The home is a modest1+12-story brick construction with a gabled roof that faces to the side of the street. The main façade is three bays wide, with a central entry flanked by sash windows in rectangular openings on either side of the main entrance.

  • The interior is laid out in a traditional center hall style, with four rooms on the main floor and two tiny bedrooms on the attic level, respectively.
  • The mansion was erected in 1828 by the abolitionist Presbyterian clergyman John Rankin, who lived there with his large family during the abolitionist movement.
  • It’s believed that Rankin participated in the liberation of more than 2,000 slaves while putting his own life in danger on several occasions.
  • After the American Civil War, the Rankins sold the house, which was later bought by the state in 1938 for use as a historical site.

See also

  • The John P. Parker House in Ripley, which was owned by another conductor on the Underground Railroad
  • A list of Underground Railroad locations
  • A list of National Historic Landmarks in Ohio
  • And a list of Underground Railroad sites in other states.

References

  • The Ohio History Connection
  • The Ripley Ohio Historic Buildings
  • And Aboard the Underground Railroad are some of the resources available. The “John Rankin House” is part of the Historic American Buildings Survey conducted by the National Park Service (pdf). Photographs. The National Park Service is a federal agency. Retrieved on May 18, 2012

Underground Railroad in Ohio

On the Underground Railroad: Aboard the Underground Railroad; Ohio History Connection; Ripley, Ohio Historic Buildings; A Historic American Buildings Survey of the “John Rankin House” was conducted by the National Park Service (pdf). Photographs. Park Service of the United States 18th of May, 2012, was retrieved.

  • Slaves were referred to as “cargo” or “passengers.” Stations were used to refer to hiding locations or safe homes. Conductors were the guides who escorted the runaway slaves to freedom. Those who assisted slaves in their escape but did not guide them were referred to as agents. People who contributed financial resources to these endeavors were referred to as shareholders.

The use of the same terminology associated with railroads to describe the activities associated with the Underground Railroad became more widespread as physical railroads became more common. This allowed those actively involved in the Underground Railroad to communicate openly without fear of being turned over to the authorities by someone overhearing their conversation. At the time, these code phrases were not known outside of the network, which is understandable given their importance. The title “liberation train” or “the gospel train” was used in certain parts of the country, and in others it was referred to as “the freedom train.” By the 1850s, the name “Underground Railroad” had become the most often used in the state of Ohio.

A fugitive slave could not be assisted under state or federal law, and this was a criminal offense.

It was the plantation owner’s responsibility to apply further punishment to captured slaves when they were returned to the plantation and fields from where they had escaped. This may include physical punishment, prolonged incarceration, or even selling the slaves back to their captors.

Ohio Anti-Slavery Society

The use of the same terminology associated with railroads to describe the activities associated with the Underground Railroad became more widespread as physical railroads became more common. This allowed those actively involved in the Underground Railroad to communicate openly without fear of being turned over to the authorities by someone who overheard their conversation. At the time, these code phrases were not known outside of the network, which is understandable given their significance. It was referred to as “the gospel train” in certain parts of the country, while in others it was called “the freedom train.” By the 1850s, the name “Underground Railroad” had become the most widely used in Ohio.

In order to assist a fleeing slave, one had to violate not only state but also federal law.

It was the plantation owner’s responsibility to apply further punishment to captured slaves when they were returned to the plantation and farms from which they had escaped.

Freedom Center in Cincinnati

The use of the same terminology associated with railroads to describe the activities associated with the Underground Railroad became more widespread as physical railroads became more common. This allowed those actively involved in the Underground Railroad to communicate openly without fear of being turned over to the authorities by someone overhearing the conversation. Of course, these code phrases were not known outside of the network at the time. The title “freedom train” or “the gospel train” was used in some parts of the country, whilst in others it was referred to as “the gospel train.” By the 1850s, the name “Underground Railroad” had become the most often used in Ohio.

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It was against state and federal law to assist a runaway slave.

It was the plantation owner’s responsibility to inflict further punishment to captured slaves when they were returned to the plantation and fields from where they had fled.

The Journey

As physical railroads became more common, applying the same terminology associated with railroads to the activities associated with the Underground Railroad allowed those actively involved to communicate openly without fear of being turned over to the authorities by someone overhearing their conversation. Of course, at the time, these code phrases were not known to anybody outside of the network. In certain parts of the nation, different language was employed, such as “the freedom train” or “the gospel train.” By the 1850s, the phrase “Underground Railroad” had become the most widely heard in Ohio.

It was against not just state law, but also federal law, to assist a runaway slave.

Captured slaves were frequently abused by their captors, and when they were returned to the plantations and fields from where they had fled, it was up to the plantation owner to apply additional punishment, which might include physical punishment, extended incarceration, or even being sold.

Journey’s end

In search of a safe refuge where they could live with their families without the fear of being shackled in captivity, escaping slaves came across the United States of America. The only certain location was Canada (and, to a lesser extent, Mexico), although getting to these locations was far from straightforward. As soon as an escaped slave arrived on the borders of Canada, they discovered that living there was incredibly harsh, with little job and strict segregation. After escaping slaves made it to Canada, they would frequently return to Ohio, where they might join tiny enclaves of freed slaves that had already been established in remote places, where they could try to stay as inconspicuous as they possibly could.

ABOVE: The narrative of a slave was recounted at the New Boston Fair.

African-Americans helped make the Underground Railroad work

The fact that escaping slaves made the Underground Railroad feasible was the most significant component of the Underground Railroad’s history. If it hadn’t been for their daring, tenacity, and innovation, the railroad would have been nothing more than a footnote in the history of our nation’s development. It was necessary for the majority of runaway slaves not only to get away from their owner’s estate, but also from all of the areas between them and the Ohio River, as well as from all of the other entrance points between the slave and free states.

  • Aside from avoiding their previous masters, they also had to dodge the slave-catchers who prowled the countryside in pursuit of fugitives.
  • The runaway slaves had a tough voyage since they had to hide in the woods during the day and travel only at night.
  • As soon as they passed over the Ohio River, they had to make contact with someone they had never met before, and they had to hope that they would be able to give them with refuge and assistance on their long voyage ahead of them.
  • That occurred at a period when the Ohio River frequently froze over, making it possible for the runaways to cross the river without the need of a boat.
  • The ice was frequently more like giant pieces of floating ice, which needed cautious footwork to make it safely across the river at night, just by looking at the river itself and not taking into consideration the extremely low temperatures.

Slaves who had already completed the trek to freedom would frequently return to assist others, putting their own safety and freedom at tremendous risk.

Paying the Price:

A fugitive slave from a Kentucky farm owned by John Bacon who was 17 years old at the time of his capture on September 13, 1858, by two slave hunters and two federal marshals in Oberlin, Ohio, was residing in Oberlin at the time of his arrest. Realizing that attempting to apprehend the young black man in the town of Oberlin would be difficult due to the well-known anti-slavery attitudes held by the town’s residents, they devised a plan to lure John Price away from the protection of Oberlin. On the pretext of digging potatoes for money, they persuaded Shakespeare Boynton, the son of a prominent Oberlin landowner, to accompany John Price to a farm west of Oberlin where he would be paid for his efforts.

  1. The ruse was successful.
  2. Anti-slavery activists in Oberlin were angry as soon as they saw what had happened and rallied together to try to save the slaves.
  3. By late afternoon, more than 200 people from Oberlin and Wellington had gathered outside the Wadsworth Hotel, where Price was being kept captive.
  4. There was a window with a little balcony that overlooked the town square in that room.
  5. The sheriff wanted to make sure that all of the paperwork was in order.
  6. Then, from the outside, someone set up a ladder near the room’s window, and a group of Oberlin locals climbed in via the window while another group entered through the door.
  7. Price went on the Underground Railroad to Canada a few days later, but was never seen or heard from again after that.
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In lieu of posting bond, they were sent to the Cuyahoga County Jail for almost one month, where they remain today.

The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue Case had a significant impact on the public’s opposition to the Fugitive Slave Act, which was one of the reasons that contributed to the American Civil War.

Smith, Richard Winsor, Simeon Bushnell, David Watson, William E.

Scott, Ansel W.

Peck, and James M.

Smith. Ralph Plumb, James Bartlett, John Watson, and Henry Evans are seated at the table. A technicality in their indictments caused two of the men, Jacob B. Shipherd and Orindatus S.B. Wall, to be released sooner than the others. As a result, they are not featured.

Additional information aboutthe Underground Railroad

On September 13, 1858, two slave hunters and two federal marshals apprehended John Price, a 17-year-old fugitive slave from a Kentucky farm owned by John Bacon, who was residing in Oberlin at the time of his capture. Realizing that attempting to apprehend the young black man in the town of Oberlin would be difficult due to the well-known anti-slavery attitudes held by the town’s residents, they devised a plan to lure John Price out of the protection of the town. On the pretext of digging potatoes for money, they persuaded Shakespeare Boynton, the son of a rich Oberlin landowner, to accompany John Price out to a property located west of Oberlin.

  • Everything went smoothly with the con game.
  • Anti-slavery activists in Oberlin were angry as soon as they saw what had happened and rallied together to try to save the slaves.
  • By late afternoon, more than 200 people from Oberlin and Wellington had gathered outside the Wadsworth Hotel, where Price was being kept captive.
  • With a window and a tiny balcony facing the town square, it room provided spectacular views.
  • This was done by the sheriff to make sure that all of the paperwork was in proper order.
  • From the outside, someone erected a ladder next to the room’s window, and a group of Oberlin locals climbed in through the window, while another group entered through the front door.
  • He was then placed into a wagon and transported back to the Oberlin house of Professor James Fairchild.

Thirty-seven of the 200 people who had converged on Wellington and assisted in the rescue of Price were charged in Federal Court for their roles in the incident, and another twenty-one of them were detained by police.

Upon being charged with abduction, the slave catchers and marshals reached an agreement to dismiss the charges.

The following items are depicted in the photo above: (standing from left to right) Sheriff David Wightman, jailer John B.

Lincoln, Charles Langston, Wilson Bruce Evans, John H.

Lyman, Henry E.

Fitch are among those who have served as deputies under Sheriff David Wightman and jailer John B.

Smith. Ralph Plumb, James Bartlett, John Watson, and Henry Evans are seated in the front row of the audience. A technicality in their indictments caused two of the men, Jacob B. Shipherd and Orindatus S.B. Wall, to be released sooner than the others. As a result, they are not shown in the photo.

See Also

While almost everyone has heard of the Underground Railroad, few are aware of the historical context in which the term originated. Tice Davids, a fugitive slave from Kentucky, is said to have crossed the Ohio River in 1831, right across the river from the town of Ripley, Ohio, according to one legend. Because the fugitive’s master was on the trail of Davids, the moment Davids slid into the river to swim across, his owner saw a boat on the shore and followed it. Davids’s body could be seen bobbing up and down in the river, and the owner could see him emerge on the Ohio side.

Davids, on the other hand, was nowhere to be seen, prompting the dissatisfied proprietor to declare that Davids must have “gone on a subterranean route.” Although the practice of assisting escaped slaves predates the advent of the train and the fast expansion of the railroad system during this time period, these terms were added to the phrase “underground route” to distinguish it from other forms of transportation.

Others who supported the activity also appropriated railroad words such as stations (safe homes), conductors (friends of fugitives), and phrases such as “taking the next train north,” which were used to refer to the behavior.

The Rev.

His mansion, which was perched high above the town on a ridge (as seen in the photograph above), acted as a beacon for Kentucky slaves.

However, his antislavery views were not well welcomed in the state of Tennessee, and he eventually relocated to Ohio to preach there instead.

After a brief sojourn in New Albany, Indiana, he relocated to the town in the mid-to-late 1800s.

The Autobiography of John P.

Parker, brings his narrative to life in graphic detail.

Hopefully, I will be able to visit both of these historically significant locations in the near future as I travel across the state of Ohio.

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