Ridge Near Ripley Ohio Where The Underground Railroad Housed People? (Question)

The historic Rankin House in Ripley, Ohio is one of the most important Underground Railroad sites in the country, once owned by Rev. John Rankin and his family, who helped saved thousands of slaves.

Where was the Underground Railroad in Ohio?

The main entry point to Ohio was along the Ohio River and most notably was a small community called Ripley where John Rankin and a small group assisted 1000s of escaping slaves and started them on their journey on the Underground Railroad.

Where was the Underground Railroad in northwest Ohio?

This Underground Railroad work was done in the heart of the Great Black Swamp of northern Ohio where travel was difficult and dangerous.

Where did slaves cross the Ohio River?

The Ross-Gowdy House in New Richmond is one of several Underground Railroad sites in Clermont County. For many enslaved people the Ohio River was more than a body of water. Crossing it was a huge step on the path to freedom.

Where did the Underground Railroad have safe houses?

In the years leading up to the Civil War, the black abolitionist William Still offered shelter to hundreds of freedom seekers as they journeyed northward.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

What did John Parker invent?

Beginning as an iron moulder, Parker developed and patented a number of mechanical and industrial inventions, including the John P. Parker tobacco press and harrow (or pulverizer), patented in 1884 and 1885. He had invented the pulverizer while still a young man in Mobile in the 1840s.

When did Parker escape slavery?

John Parker was born a slave. In 1845, he purchased his freedom and eventually made his way to Indiana and Ohio, settling in Ripley in 1850.

When was Parker born?

John Parker was an active participant in the Underground Railroad in Ohio and helped fugitive slaves escape to freedom in the years before the American Civil War. John Parker was born on February 2, 1827 in Norfolk, Virginia. His mother was a slave, but his father was a free white man.

What cities did the Underground Railroad go through?

In the decades leading up to the American Civil War, settlements along the Detroit and Niagara Rivers were important terminals of the Underground Railroad. By 1861, some 30,000 freedom seekers resided in what is now Ontario, having escaped slave states like Kentucky and Virginia.

Why was Ohio so important to the Underground Railroad?

Ohio served as the northern “trunk line” of the Underground Railroad, a system of secret routes used by free people in the North & South to help slaves escape to freedom. Escape routes developed throughout Ohio with safe houses where slaves could be concealed during the day.

What river did the slaves have to cross to be free?

Fugitive slaves were largely on their own until they crossed the Ohio River or the Mason-Dixon Line, thereby reaching a Free State.

Did Ohio ever have slavery?

Although slavery was illegal in Ohio, a number of people still opposed the ending of slavery. Many of these people also were opposed to the Underground Railroad. Some people attacked conductors on the Underground Railroad or returned fugitives from slavery to their owners in hopes of collecting rewards.

What was Levi Coffin’s nickname?

Coffin’s active participation in the Underground Railroad caused his fellow abolitionists to nickname him the ” president of the Underground Railroad. ”

Was there ever a real underground railroad?

Nope! Despite its name, the Underground Railroad wasn’t a railroad in the way Amtrak or commuter rail is. It wasn’t even a real railroad. The Underground Railroad of history was simply a loose network of safe houses and top secret routes to states where slavery was banned.

Underground Railroad in Ohio

The monument shown above, which was erected by Cameron Armstrong on the campus of OberlinCollege and represents the beginnings of the Underground Railroad in Ohio, may be seen above. A critical crossroads on the Underground Railroad, Oberlin connected five separate paths that fleeing slaves may have traveled in order to escape. During the Civil War, no fugitive who lived in Oberlin was ever returned to bondage, and the town has been dubbed “The Town that Started the Civil War.” When Congress passed the Northwest Ordinance in 1787, one of the stipulations prohibited slavery in any future state admitted to the Union that was located north of the Ohio River.

Later, Congress amended the legislation to include a provision making it a federal criminal to help or hide fugitive slaves, which might result in harsh penalties or even imprisonment if the act was committed.

Even in a free state like Ohio, living was made incredibly difficult as a result of this.

This would be especially true in the lower half of the state, where inhabitants were more likely to have been previous residents of Virginia or Kentucky, or to have descended from ancestors who had lived in these states at some point in their lives.

  1. While speaking at local gatherings, anti-slavery activists may frequently transform them into a confrontational confrontation.
  2. In reality, most of the people on the network were only familiar with a few of the other users, which helped to keep everyone’s identities safe.
  3. Ohio, with around 3000 miles of pathways used by fleeing runaways, had the most active network of any other state, despite the fact that there were Underground Railroad networks throughout the country, including the Southern states.
  4. First and foremost, Ohio shared a border with two slave states: Virginia and Kentucky.
  5. Among all the states participating in these subterranean networks, Ohio was the one that was closest to Canada, with a distance of just roughly 250 miles or less between any point along the Ohio River and Lake Erie, where freedom might be found.

While the Pennsylvania Quakers were largely responsible for the inception of the abolitionist movement, the Ohio Quakers appeared to have been more directly involved in transporting escaping slaves on their way north and toward freedom, particularly those fleeing slaves from the Virginia plantations.

Prior to it, there was a scarcity of knowledge regarding railways in general.

There was no railroad, and there was no underground railroad with the Underground Railroad, of course.

The term railroad was utilized because the persons participating in the activities used phrases that were frequently associated with railways to describe different parts of their operations, leading to the name railroad being used.

  • Slaves were referred to as “cargo” or “passengers.” Stations were used to refer to hiding locations or safe homes. Conductors were the guides who escorted the runaway slaves to freedom. Those who assisted slaves in their escape but did not guide them were referred to as agents. People who contributed financial resources to these endeavors were referred to as shareholders.
See also:  What Was Penalty For Being Conductor On Underground Railroad? (Suits you)

The use of the same terminology associated with railroads to describe the activities associated with the Underground Railroad became more widespread as physical railroads became more common. This allowed those actively involved in the Underground Railroad to communicate openly without fear of being turned over to the authorities by someone overhearing their conversation. At the time, these code phrases were not known outside of the network, which is understandable given their importance. The title “liberation train” or “the gospel train” was used in certain parts of the country, and in others it was referred to as “the freedom train.” By the 1850s, the name “Underground Railroad” had become the most often used in the state of Ohio.

A fugitive slave could not be assisted under state or federal law, and this was a criminal offense.

It was the plantation owner’s responsibility to apply further punishment to captured slaves when they were returned to the plantation and fields from where they had escaped.

Ohio Anti-Slavery Society

An organization known as the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was founded by a group of people who shared a strong opposition to slavery. The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was created in Zanesville, Ohio, in 1835, and was modeled after the framework of the American Anti-Slavery Society, which was founded in 1833 in New York City. When the society was founded, its members committed to work for the abolition of slavery and the adoption of legislation to safeguard African-Americans when they were released from the bonds of slavery.

People who opposed the abolitionists’ ideals were motivated mostly by fear, which was frequently shown in mob attacks on the abolitionists’ homes and workplaces.

When the conference was held in a barn outside of Granville, a mob erupted and attacked the abolitionists who had gathered in the barn.

In addition to bigotry, and because they were unable to accept that racism, they argued that runaway slaves from the southern states would take their employment here in Ohio.

Freedom Center in Cincinnati

When a group of people who were united in their opposition to slavery came together, they created the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society. The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was created in Zanesville, Ohio, in 1835, and was modeled after the framework of the American Anti-Slavery Society, which was established in 1833. The members of the group promised to work for the abolition of slavery as well as the adoption of legislation to safeguard African-Americans when they were released from the bonds of the slave trade.

People who opposed the abolitionists’ ideals were motivated mostly by fear, which was frequently manifested in mob attacks on the abolitionists’ homes and offices.

When the conference was held in a barn outside of Granville, a mob erupted and attacked the abolitionists who had gathered in the building.

It was a mixture of prejudice and, because they were unable to accept that bigotry, they believed that escaped slaves from the southern states would steal their positions in Ohio instead.

The Journey

The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was founded by a group of persons who had a common opposition to slavery. The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was created in Zanesville, Ohio, in 1835, and was modeled after the framework of the American Anti-Slavery Society, which was founded in 1833. The members of the group promised to work for the abolition of slavery as well as the adoption of legislation to safeguard African-Americans when they were emancipated from slavery. Despite the fact that Ohio was a free state, the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was continually under assault from local inhabitants everywhere they went.

The Ohio Anti-Slavery Convention was scheduled to have its annual conference in Granville in 1836, but the municipality refused to allow the gathering to take place inside its borders.

After attending a meeting in Zanesville, John Rankin, one of the society’s founders, was assaulted in Chillicothe.

Journey’s end

The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was founded by a group of like-minded persons who were opposed to slavery. The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was created in Zanesville in 1835, and it was modeled after the framework of the American Anti-Slavery Society, which was founded in 1833. The members of the group swore to work for the abolition of slavery and the adoption of legislation to safeguard African-Americans when they were emancipated from slavery. Despite the fact that Ohio was a free state, the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was continually under assault by local inhabitants everywhere they went.

The Ohio Anti-Slavery Convention was scheduled to have its annual conference in Granville in 1836, but the community refused to allow the gathering to take place within the town’s limits.

After attending a meeting in Zanesville, John Rankin, one of the society’s founding members, was attacked in Chillicothe.

African-Americans helped make the Underground Railroad work

An organization known as the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was founded by a group of people who shared a strong opposition to slavery. The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was created in Zanesville, Ohio, in 1835, and was modeled after the framework of the American Anti-Slavery Society, which was founded in 1833 in New York City. When the society was founded, its members committed to work for the abolition of slavery and the adoption of legislation to safeguard African-Americans when they were released from the bonds of slavery.

People who opposed the abolitionists’ ideals were motivated mostly by fear, which was frequently shown in mob attacks on the abolitionists’ homes and workplaces.

When the conference was held in a barn outside of Granville, a mob erupted and attacked the abolitionists who had gathered in the barn.

In addition to bigotry, and because they were unable to accept that racism, they argued that runaway slaves from the southern states would take their employment here in Ohio.

Paying the Price:

When a group of people who were united in their opposition to slavery came together, they created the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society. The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was created in Zanesville, Ohio, in 1835, and was modeled after the framework of the American Anti-Slavery Society, which was established in 1833. The members of the group promised to work for the abolition of slavery as well as the adoption of legislation to safeguard African-Americans when they were released from the bonds of the slave trade.

People who opposed the abolitionists’ ideals were motivated mostly by fear, which was frequently manifested in mob attacks on the abolitionists’ homes and offices.

When the conference was held in a barn outside of Granville, a mob erupted and attacked the abolitionists who had gathered in the building.

It was a mixture of prejudice and, because they were unable to accept that bigotry, they believed that escaped slaves from the southern states would steal their positions in Ohio instead.

Additional information aboutthe Underground Railroad

A National Historic Landmark, this was the home of Presbyterian minister John Rankin who is reputed to have been one of Ohio’s first and most active “conductors” on the Underground Railroad.In addition, he wroteLetters on American Slavery, first published in book form in 1826, and among the first clearly articulated antislavery views printed west of the Appalachians.Letters on American Slaverybecame standard reading for abolitionists all over the United States by the 1830s.From 1822 to 1865, Rankin, along with his wife and children, assisted hundreds of escaped slaves in their trek to freedom.Located on the Ohio River, John Rankin’s home (and Ripley, Ohio in general) were considered one of the first stations on this route of the Underground Railroad.It was here that Harriet Beecher Stowe heard the escaping slave’s story which became the basis for part of her famous work,Uncle Tom’s Cabin.John Parker,a Ripley abolitionist and former slave who was active in the Underground Railroad, wrote of Rankin, “At times attacked on all sides by masters seeking their slaves,beat back their assailant, and held its threshold unsullied.A lighted candle stood as a beacon which could be seen from across the river, and like the north star was the guide to the fleeing slave.”The John Rankin House is located in Ripley, Ohio at 6152 Rankin Road.Now a museum it is openfromMay 2 through October 31from 10:00am to 5:00pm Wednesday-Saturday, and 12:00pm to 5:00pm on Sunday. The museum is also open on Sunday, December 16 from 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm for the Historic House Tour. The museum is open by appointment only during other times of the year, please call 937-392-4044. There is a fee for admission. For further information, visit themuseum’s website. Previous|List of Sites|Home| Next
See also:  What Did John Brown Do In Underground Railroad? (The answer is found)

John Rankin House (Ripley) – 2022 All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

Nov 2021You will be taken on an educational and emotional tour of history by a wonderful guide who is highly informed about the subject. Written on November 15, 2021This review represents the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor Inc. The month of August 2021CouplesEnjoy these historical institutions that chronicle our past, whether it be for the better or for the worse. The museum is easily navigated, and the grounds are well-marked with information on the Underground Railroad.

  1. It was a well-spent hour.
  2. Jul 2021We had a fantastic time on our instructive tour, and Howard gave a fantastic and entertaining presentation.
  3. Written on July 25, 2021This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC.
  4. What a delightful surprise.
  5. This information was brought to our notice by a docent at the Grant Boyhood Home.
  6. The Rankin family’s saga was very compelling to read about.
  7. In May of 2021, we were in Ripley, and we much appreciated the informative tour provided by Howard at the Rankin House.

Overall, I would recommend visiting Ripley and enjoying the local sites rather than traveling to Cincinnati to attend the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center (NURFC).

In addition, the landscape is breathtakingly lovely and magnificent.

Written on May 27, 2021This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC.

is a woman who lives in the United States.

The contributions made by Cincinnati Region6 May of the year 2021 Our second visit to the John Rankin residence has been a great success.

The history of abolition in this nation is incomplete without the presence of John Rankin and this building.

Despite the fact that my wife and I are well-versed in history, our daughter and grandson found it to be a really educational experience.

This area is a component of Ohio’s oldest developed region, which dates back to the late 1800s.

Written on the 8th of May, 2021 This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC.

We were interested in learning more about these two brave men, so we looked them up on the internet and discovered that they lived about an hour’s drive from Cincinnati in the town of Ripley, Ohio.

What a fascinating individual.

He possessed in-depth knowledge of John Rankin and was extremely enthusiastic about the issue of slavery and the abolitionists’ struggle for liberation.

The home of John Parker is located just down the hill from the Rankin residence (but sadly it was closed on the day we visited).

In such a little location, there is so much history!

Written on the 5th of May, 2021 This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC.

Located on a hill behind Ripley, Ohio, the John Rankin mansion boasts a breathtaking view of the surrounding countryside.

In the house, we were shown around by a knowledgeable tour guide who showed us the interior, which was decorated in 19th-century style.

Written on April 23, 2021This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC.

The tour guide was just fantastic.

It comes highly recommended.

BradWinchester, Kentucky (KY) Contributions totaled 332 January in the next year, 2021 This is a beautiful piece of American history!

Ranking would build a fort on a high hill and light a lantern there at night in order to entice escaping slaves who had finally made it across the river to safety.

Aside from all of the historical significance, the views from this hilltop overlooking the Ohio River are extremely magnificent, as is the setting.

Written on the 23rd of January, 2021 This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC. Results 1-10 of a total of 77

John Rankin House (Ripley, Ohio) – Wikipedia

John Rankin House
U.S. National Register of Historic Places
U.S. National Historic Landmark
Location 6152 Rankin Hill Rd.,Ripley, Ohio
Coordinates 38°45′4″N83°50′32″W / 38.75111°N 83.84222°WCoordinates:38°45′4″N83°50′32″W / 38.75111°N 83.84222°W
Area 20 acres (8.1 ha)
Built 1828
NRHP referenceNo. 70000485
Significant dates
Added to NRHP November 10, 1970
Designated NHL February 18, 1997

The John Rankin Home, located at 6152 Rankin Hill Road in Ripley, Ohio, is a historic house museum. It was built in 1828 and served as the residence of Presbyterian abolitionist John Rankin, as well as one of the first sites on the Underground Railroad. The visit of Harriet Beecher Stowe to Rankin provided inspiration for part of the narrative that became Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The mansion, which was purchased by the state of Ohio in 1938, is currently administered by the Ohio History Connection and is accessible for public visits on a daily basis.

Description and history

Located on top of a hill overlooking the town of Ripley and the Ohio River, the John Rankin House is a popular destination for visitors. On approximately 20 acres (8.1 hectares), it is accessible through a road and visitors center located off Rankin Hill Road (County Road 556). The home is a modest1+12-story brick construction with a gabled roof that faces to the side of the street. The main façade is three bays wide, with a central entry flanked by sash windows in rectangular openings on either side of the main entrance.

  • The interior is laid out in a traditional center hall style, with four rooms on the main floor and two tiny bedrooms on the attic level, respectively.
  • The mansion was erected in 1828 by the abolitionist Presbyterian clergyman John Rankin, who lived there with his large family during the abolitionist movement.
  • It’s believed that Rankin participated in the liberation of more than 2,000 slaves while putting his own life in danger on several occasions.
  • After the American Civil War, the Rankins sold the house, which was later bought by the state in 1938 for use as a historical site.
See also:  Who Escaped The Underground Railroad And Who Became Famous Conductor? (Correct answer)

See also

  • The John P. Parker House in Ripley, which was owned by another conductor on the Underground Railroad
  • A list of Underground Railroad locations
  • A list of National Historic Landmarks in Ohio
  • And a list of Underground Railroad sites in other states.

References

  • The Ohio History Connection
  • The Ripley Ohio Historic Buildings
  • And Aboard the Underground Railroad are some of the resources available. The “John Rankin House” is part of the Historic American Buildings Survey conducted by the National Park Service (pdf). Photographs. The National Park Service is a federal agency. Retrieved on May 18, 2012

OUTSIDE CINCINNATI, OHIO’S UNDERGROUND ATTRACTIONS

In Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” a significant incident takes place on the Ohio River, when the fugitive slave Eliza braves ice floes in order to cross the river. Stowe had learned of a real-life escape like this from a Presbyterian pastor in Ripley, Ohio, called John Rankin, and she re-created it in her novel, which helped to mobilize anti-slavery feeling in the United States before the American Civil War began. Toni Morrison’s novel “Beloved,” which is likewise concerned with the abolition of slavery, is situated on this river as well—the Ohio served as a physical barrier between the slaveholding South and the slave-owning North at the time of the novel’s publication.

  1. They take a fascinating side excursion from the Cincinnati airport, which is about an hour away by car.
  2. Today, it is a peaceful hamlet that is proud of its history.
  3. One such address was 114, which once belonged to Alexander Campbell.
  4. He was born in Virginia but emancipated his own slaves before moving to Ohio.
  5. ‘His Promised Land: The Autobiography of John P.
  6. Norton, is Parker’s autobiography.
  7. Rankin’s, which is located on Liberty Hill, a high ridge beyond town that is now a national historic site that is available to the public, after completing their mission.

Under cover of night, they made their way up the steep slope on rough stone staircases.

Cross the Ohio River nine miles east of Ripley to Maysville, Ky., where you’ll discover the National Underground Railroad Museum, which showcases items from slavery and can take you to locations in the town where fleeing slaves sought refuge.

A few of these include a residence where Harriet Beecher Stowe, at 22 years old, was a guest when she observed a slave sale, an incident that she subsequently wrote about in her book.

Route 52, approximately 50 miles east of Cincinnati.

The Rankin House (Liberty Hill; 937-392-1627) will be closed for the season until Memorial Day weekend, but it is still open for special visits by appointment only; contact 937-392-4044 for more information.

The Signal House Bed & Breakfast (where the Rev.

Front St.

The cost of a double room with a shared bathroom is $75.

Grant stayed while attending school), 206 North Front St., Ripley, Ohio 45167, 937-392-1556 (toll free).

The National Underground Railroad Museum is located at 115 E.

in Maysville, Kentucky 41056 and can be reached at 606-564-6986.

41096, 606-759-7411, is the location of the Washington Visitors Center.

For adults, it costs $5, and for youngsters, it costs $2.

Aerial view of the Rankin Home in Ripley, Ohio, which served as a major station on the Underground Railroad; above, the rough ladder that runaway slaves used to get to the house. One of the cottages on Front Street in Ripley that served as a haven for fugitive slaves may be seen at left.

Origins of Underground Railroad Name

The Ohio River is the setting for a critical sequence in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” in which the fugitive slave Eliza braves ice floes to cross it. During her research for the book, Stowe learned of a real-life escape like this from a Presbyterian pastor in Ripley, Ohio, called John Rankin, and she re-created it in her novel, which helped to mobilize anti-slavery opinion before the Civil War. To be sure, this river is also the setting for Toni Morrison’s “Beloved,” which is likewise about the abolition of slavery and takes place on this river—the Ohio served as a physical barrier between the slaveholding South and the slave-owning North.

They take a fascinating side excursion about an hour’s drive from the Cincinnati airport.

As a result, it is a peaceful hamlet that is proud of its history today.

114 was the address of Alexander Campbell’s residence, for example.

He was born in Virginia but emancipated his own slaves.

In fact, Parker’s book, “His Promised Land: The Autobiography of John P.

Norton.

Rankin’s, which is located on Liberty Hill, a high ridge beyond town that is now a national historic site that is available to visitors.

They made their way up the steep hill on rough stone stairs in the darkness.

Cross the Ohio River nine miles east of Ripley to Maysville, Ky., where you’ll discover the National Underground Railroad Museum, which exhibits items from slavery and can take you to locations in town where runaway slaves sought refuge during the American Civil War.

For example, a mansion where Harriet Beecher Stowe, at 22, was a guest when she observed a slave sale, which she subsequently detailed in her book Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Slave Auction United States Route 52 takes you to Ripley, which is 50 miles east of Cincinnati.

From now through Memorial Day weekend, Rankin House (Liberty Hill, 937-392-1627) will be closed for the season, but special visits can be arranged by calling 937-392-4044.

The Signal House Bed & Breakfast (where the Rev.

Front St.

Shared baths are available for $75 per night in double rooms.

Grant slept while attending school), 206 North Front St., 937-392-1556 (phone).

For more information, call 606-564-6986 or visit the National Underground Railroad Museum, located at 115 East Third Street in Maysville, Ky.

41096, 606-759-7411, Washington Visitors Center, the Cane Brake Every day by appointment, tours of the Underground Railroad are conducted.

Aerial view of the Rankin House in Ripley, Ohio, which served as a major station on the Underground Railroad.

Above, the rough ladder that runaway slaves used to get to the house. One of the residences on Front Street in Ripley that served as a haven for fugitive slaves may be seen to the left of the photograph.

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