What Book Has An Underground Railroad Family Helping Escaped Slaves? (Best solution)

The Underground Railroad is a historical fiction novel by American author Colson Whitehead, published by Doubleday in 2016.

The Underground Railroad (novel)

Author Colson Whitehead
Language English
Subject Slavery
Publisher Doubleday
Publication date August 2, 2016

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Who helped slaves escape through the Underground Railroad?

Harriet Tubman, perhaps the most well-known conductor of the Underground Railroad, helped hundreds of runaway slaves escape to freedom. She never lost one of them along the way.

Is the book The Underground Railroad a true story?

Adapted from Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer-award-winning novel, The Underground Railroad is based on harrowing true events. The ten-parter tells the story of escaped slave, Cora, who grew up on The Randall plantation in Georgia.

How did Fairfield help slaves escape?

Posing as a slaveholder, a slave trader, and sometimes a peddler, Fairfield was able to gain the confidence of whites, which made it easier for him to lead runaway slaves to freedom. One of his most impressive feats was freeing 28 slaves by staging a funeral procession.

Who helped the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad had many notable participants, including John Fairfield in Ohio, the son of a slaveholding family, who made many daring rescues, Levi Coffin, a Quaker who assisted more than 3,000 slaves, and Harriet Tubman, who made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom.

Does the Underground Railroad still exist?

It includes four buildings, two of which were used by Harriet Tubman. Ashtabula County had over thirty known Underground Railroad stations, or safehouses, and many more conductors. Nearly two-thirds of those sites still stand today.

Who is Colson Whitehead’s wife?

The article uses the novel’s example of Valentine Farm, a fictional 1850s black settlement in Indiana where protagonist Cora lands after her rescue from a fugitive slave catcher by Royal, a freeborn black radical and railroad agent.

Was Thomas Garrett White?

*Thomas Garrett was born on this date in 1789. He was a white-American businessman and abolitionist. Thomas Garrett was the son of a farmer from Delaware County. Garrett turned his home in Wilmington into the last station on the Underground Railroad before the slaves reached freedom in Pennsylvania.

How many slaves escaped on the Underground Railroad?

The total number of runaways who used the Underground Railroad to escape to freedom is not known, but some estimates exceed 100,000 freed slaves during the antebellum period.

Did Thomas Garrett have a wife?

He was an iron merchant by trade. After moving to Wilmington, DE, he married his first wife, Mary Sharpless and the couple had five children. After Mary’s death, he married Rachael Mendenhall and they had one son. Thomas Garrett is best known for his tireless efforts in behalf of the abolition of slavery.

How many slaves escaped to Canada using the Underground Railroad?

In all 30,000 slaves fled to Canada, many with the help of the underground railroad – a secret network of free blacks and white sympathizers who helped runaways.

Why did John Fairfield help in the Underground Railroad?

Some assert Fairfield exploited the slaves because he charged relatives in Canada to get their family members to safety, but he used the fees to help concoct elaborate ruses that he used to steal the slaves and help them to freedom.

How many slaves did Harriet Tubman help free via the Underground Railroad?

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the most well-known of all the Underground Railroad’s “conductors.” During a ten-year span she made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom. And, as she once proudly pointed out to Frederick Douglass, in all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.”

Escape to Freedom: The Underground Railroad Adventures of Callie and William

The National Geographic Society publishes this historical fiction by Barbara Brooks-Simon as part of their “I Am American” collection, which includes other historical novels. Escape to Freedom is a novel created for children between the ages of 8 and 12. The age range is based on reading rather than content appropriateness, as is often the case. Callie Taylor, her grandmother Martha, and William Ballard are all examples of the numerous people that were enslaved in this country. An introduction to the Underground Railroad is provided before the author launches into her fictitious story of Callie, who is 14 years old and living in the year 1858.

When Callie discovers that her owner may be intending to sell her at an auction, she understands that she may have just a few hours left to flee the country.

Around the same time, a slave called William from Elizabethtown, Ky., comes to the realization that he must flee or risk being sold into slavery.

Code words were used by those who traveled on and ran the railroad.

  1. Escaping slaves were often referred to as “packages” when they were caught.
  2. As they went discreetly through the night to avoid being captured by slave hunters, they sought and listened for concealed signals, lights in windows, and messages buried in spiritual hymns, all of which they found.
  3. Their group makes its way slowly northward, finally making its way into Canada.
  4. When the Thirteenth Amendment is passed, they will be able to return to the United States.
  5. Quakers, a religious community also known as the Society of Friends, are opposed to slavery and are frequently called upon to assist slaves in escaping.
  6. Spirituals frequently contain several meanings, allowing slaves to communicate with one another via the medium of song.
  7. By publishing an abolitionist newspaper, escaped slave Frederick Douglass serves as an inspiration to others.

John Rankin provide refuge and assistance to slaves despite the fact that their acts enrage local slave owners.

If your children have read this book, or if someone has read it to them, you might want to examine the following subjects for discussion: When you first started reading this book, how much did you know about the Underground Railroad?

What would have been the most terrifying aspect of being a slave on the run for freedom?

Why do these folks put their lives in danger to help complete strangers?

In addition to discussing the substance, themes, and worldviews of fiction novels, rather than their literary worth, book reviews provide parents with the information they need to choose if a book is acceptable for their children.

The inclusion of a book on this list does not imply endorsement by Focus on the Family of that book. You can ask for a review of a title that you can’t find on the website. RomanceRomance Children’s Literature Historical Children’s Literature

16 Children’s Books About the Underground Railroad

It is part of the “I Am American” series, which is published by the National Geographic Society, and is written by Barbara Brooks-Simon in the first person. For children aged 8 to 12 years, Escape to Freedom is written. In this case, the age range is based on readability rather than content appropriateness. Among the many who were slaves were Callie Taylor, her grandmother Martha, and William Ballard. An introduction to the Underground Railroad is provided before the author launches into her fictitious story of Callie, who is 14 years old and growing up in the year 1858.

  • Upon realizing that her owner may be trying to auction her off, Callie understands that this may be her final chance to get away.
  • William, a slave from Elizabethtown, Ky., learns that he must either flee or be sold at the same time as William.
  • – Code words were used by those who traveled on and ran the railroad.
  • Escaping slaves were referred to as “packages” in some cases.
  • In order to escape being apprehended by slave hunters, they traveled discreetly through the night, looking and listening for secret signs, lights on windows, and messages buried in spiritual music.
  • Their group makes their way slowly northward, finally making its way into Canada to seek refuge there.
  • When the Thirteenth Amendment is passed, they will be able to return to the United States of America.

Quakers, a religious community also known as the Society of Friends, are opposed to slavery and frequently assist slaves in their attempts to elude capture or execution.

Often, spirituals have two meanings, which allows slaves to communicate with one another through them.

Writing an abolitionist newspaper while on the run, escaped slave Frederick Douglass serves as an example to others.

John Rankin’s efforts to provide refuge and assistance to slaves.

If your children have read this book, or if someone has read it to them, you might want to examine the following subjects for conversation.

* In what fresh facts or knowledge did you take away from your experience?

If slaves are escaping, who is there to assist and support them?

Focus on the Family, a donor-supported ministry, has provided this evaluation for your consideration.

Included books do not imply sponsorship by Focus on the Family, and vice versa. In the event that you can’t find a title, you might ask for a review of it. RomanceRomance Fiction for Young People Historical Fiction for Young People

16 Books About the Underground Railroad

Using the biography of an American hero as inspiration, Adler has written yet another outstanding picture book. This book chronicles Harriet Tubman from her upbringing as a slave in Maryland to her emancipation via the Underground Railroad, and then to her return to the South to aid in the emancipation of other African-Americans. It also depicts her life during and after the Civil War, during which she continued to serve others and fight for justice for the rights of women. My recommendation for readers ages 5 and above is to read any of Adler’s biographies.

Follow the Drinking Gourdby Bernadine Connelly

This novel, which is inspired on the popular American folk song of the same name, tells the story of one family’s escape from slavery through the Underground Railroad system. It demonstrates how individuals fleeing to freedom would rely on natural cues such as stars to navigate their way to the northern reaches of the continent. This book is appropriate for children aged 5 and up. This story is also available on DVD, with Morgan Freeman providing the narration.

Henry’s Freedom Boxby Ellen Levine

This narrative, which is based on the popular American folk song of the same name, depicts a family’s escape from slavery through the Underground Railroad. It demonstrates how individuals fleeing to freedom would rely on natural cues such as stars to navigate their way to the northern reaches of the country. For children aged 5 and up, I suggest this book. This story is also available on DVD, with Morgan Freeman narrating.

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quiltby Deborah Hopkinson

In the midst of her enslavement and sewn-up existence, a young lady named Clara dreams of achieving freedom, both for herself and for her family. Sometime later, she overhears two other slaves discussing something known as the Underground Railroad, and she understands that she may use her abilities as a seamstress to assist others in their journeys toward freedom. It is her dream to create a quilt from scraps of cloth, which can also serve as a map to help her find her way to freedom in the North, thanks to the Underground Railroad.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroadby Henry Cole

It is just the hauntingly beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period in this frightening picture book; there are no words. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision about her future. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor lurking in the shadows? Do you think she’ll go with the flow and follow her heart and compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

See also:  The Underground Railroad Was A Key Component Of Which Movement? (Suits you)

Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroadby Pamela Duncan Edwards

With no words, only eerily beautiful drawings depict the seriousness of the historical period depicted in this chilling picture book. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision that will affect her future. What happens when she notices an unexpected invader lurking in the shadows?

Does she notify anyone? Either that, or she chooses to follow her heart and compassion. Even though this is a really emotional novel, smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is going on in the plot. Kids from the ages of 5 and above should be exposed to it.

Almost to Freedomby Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

With no words, only eerily beautiful drawings depict the seriousness of the historical period depicted in this frightening picture book. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult choice. Is she able to raise the alarm and inform someone about this unexpected invader hidden in the shadows? Alternatively, does she follow her heart and her sense of compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in comprehending what is occurring in the plot.

The Birdmanby Troon Harrison

This frightening picture book contains no text, simply eerily beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor who is lurking in the shadows? Or does she go with her heart and her feeling of compassion? This is a really emotional novel, although smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

Blacksmith’s Songby Elizabeth Van Steenwyk

In his role as a blacksmith, a small child observes his father pounding hot metal into shape, and he realizes that his father is doing much more than simply producing tools. The rhythm that his father pounds out on his anvil may be that of a slave, but the message that it sends out to those seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad is not. When Pa falls ill, the little son will be called upon to stand up to the anvil and take over the vital task. Suitable for children aged 6 and older, this picture book is a great introduction to the alphabet.

Before She Was Harrietby Lesa Cline-Ransome

Harriet Tubman is a historical figure whose full tale is unknown to those who only know her as such. She was more than just a formerly enslaved person. She was a spy, a suffragette, a general, a nurse, and a lot more things than that. This wonderful picture book goes into the numerous roles she played and the many aliases she went by during her long and illustrious life. I recommend that readers between the ages of 6 and 12 read this unusual biography.

Chapter Books and Early Readers

As Emma pays a visit to the Anacostia Museum for African American History, she finds herself transported back in time and forced to go via the Underground Railroad to freedom. Will she be able to make it out of slavery without being apprehended by the authorities? This early reader is jam-packed with information, and it is ideal for children who are reading at or above the second grade level.

What Was the Underground Railroad?by Yona Zeldis McDonough

This is the second time that theWhoHQseries has published a fantastic non-fiction book about a vital issue. This book contains intriguing data, a plethora of images, maps, and biographies of people who took part in the expedition.

An insert with images from the historical period is included so that children may see how slavery affected actual individuals who lived real lives and establish the link between the two. This gripping chapter book is best suited for children ages 8 and older because of its complexity.

Eliza’s Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diaryby Jerdine Nolen

This is the second time that theWhoHQseries has published a fantastic non-fiction book on a timely subject. There are intriguing information, a plethora of artwork, maps, and profiles of people who took part in the expedition included in this book. Children can draw the link between slavery and actual individuals who lived real lives via the use of an insert that contains images from that era. For children ages 8 and older, this gripping chapter book is a must-read!

Dear Austin: Letters From the Underground Railroadby Elvira Woodruff

Levi has formed a friendship with a young child named Jupiter, who happens to be the son of a former slave. They have a lot of fun together, playing and enjoying the Pennsylvania countryside. When Jupiter’s sister is abducted by a slave trader, Levi and Jupiter come up with a scheme to free her from being sold into slavery. Naive Levi immediately learns how dire the position of the slaves is, and he communicates his observations to his brother, Austin, through letters sent to and from the slaves.

Stealing Freedomby Elisa Carbone

Abolitionist Anna Maria Weems was born into slavery, and that is the only way she has ever known existence. Her family is her one source of happiness in life; being able to spend time with them is what makes life tolerable for her. Although being a slave frequently meant being apart from family, Anna eventually finds herself alone and without the people she cared about. She is consumed by sadness and performs the only move that appears to make sense: she flees the scene. As a guy, Anna sets out to discover independence as well as her family, which she believes she can’t find otherwise.

Bradyby Jean Fritz

Even though Brady is well-known for having a loud mouth, he’s never had to keep a secret quite like this before — the secret of an Underground Railroad stop close to his family’s house. Brady is presented with a difficult decision: should he reveal what he knows, or should he assist and protect slaves who are attempting to flee for their lives? This book is best suited for children who are reading at or above the third grade level.

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Rethinking Schools is the source for this review. Don Tate is the author of the book. Prior to learning about William Still from a Black Americans dictionary, author and illustrator Don Tate had only heard of Harriet Tubman, who had served as a conductor on the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War. He wrote about William Still, who was also a historian, in order to ensure that future generations would not be restricted to a single hero or heroism. Still came from a family that had fled slavery, regrettably having to leave behind two children in the process.

  1. One of the persons that came to Still’s office in Philadelphia to hear his story was his elder brother Peter, who was one of many who came to hear it.
  2. Still’s meticulous documentation is still in use today by scholars.
  3. William Still and the Freedom Stories that he told Don Tate contributed to this article.
  4. Genres: African-American Pop Music Pages:46 Reading Levels: Grades 1-2, Grades 3-5, and Advanced Placement ISBN:9781682632772 Rethinking Schools is the source for this review.
  5. Don Tate, author and artist of the Ezra Jack Keats Award-winning picture book history of William Still, renowned as the “Father of the Underground Railroad,” has created a magnificent picture book biography of William Still.
  6. After escaping slavery, William Still’s parents were forced to leave behind two of their children, a tragedy that tormented the Still family for many years.
  7. One day, a very familiar guy walked into William’s office, seeking information about his long-lost relatives.
  8. Is it possible?
  9. This enabled him to bring together other families and to amass an incredible collection of information, which included interactions with Harriet Tubman, Henry “Box” Brown, and William & Ellen Craft.

Young readers will be inspired by Tate’s dramatic words and artwork in this groundbreaking picture book biography of the Father of the Underground Railroad, which is the first of its kind.

The True History Behind Amazon Prime’s ‘Underground Railroad’

If you want to know what this country is all about, I always say, you have to ride the rails,” the train’s conductor tells Cora, the fictitious protagonist of Colson Whitehead’s 2016 novelThe Underground Railroad, as she walks into a boxcar destined for the North. As you race through, take a look about you to see the genuine face of America.” Cora’s vision is limited to “just blackness, mile after mile,” according to Whitehead, as she peers through the carriage’s slats. In the course of her traumatic escape from servitude, the adolescent eventually understands that the conductor’s remark was “a joke.

  1. Cora and Caesar, a young man enslaved on the same Georgia plantation as her, are on their way to liberation when they encounter a dark other world in which they use the railroad to go to freedom.
  2. ” The Underground Railroad,” a ten-part limited series premiering this week on Amazon Prime Video, is directed by Moonlight filmmaker Barry Jenkins and is based on the renowned novel by Alfred North Whitehead.
  3. When it comes to portraying slavery, Jenkins takes a similar approach to Whitehead’s in the series’ source material.
  4. “And as a result, I believe their individuality has been preserved,” Jenkins says Felix.
  5. The consequences of their actions are being inflicted upon them.” Here’s all you need to know about the historical backdrop that informs both the novel and the streaming adaptation of “The Underground Railroad,” which will premiere on May 14th.

Did Colson Whitehead baseThe Underground Railroadon a true story?

“The reality of things,” in Whitehead’s own words, is what he aims to portray in his work, not “the facts.” His characters are entirely made up, and the story of the book, while based on historical facts, is told in an episodic style, as is the case with most episodic fiction. This book traces Cora’s trek to freedom, describing her lengthy trip from Georgia to the Carolinas, Tennessee and Indiana.) Each step of the journey presents a fresh set of hazards that are beyond Cora’s control, and many of the people she meets suffer horrible ends.) What distinguishes The Underground Railroad from previous works on the subject is its presentation of the titular network as a physical rather than a figurative transportation mechanism.

According to Whitehead, who spoke to NPR in 2016, this alteration was prompted by his “childhood belief” that the Underground Railroad was a “literal tunnel beneath the earth”—a misperception that is surprisingly widespread.

Webber Public domain image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons While the Underground Railroad was composed of “local networks of anti-slavery people,” both Black and white, according to Pulitzer Prize–winning historianEric Foner, the Underground Railroad actually consisted of “local networks of anti-slavery people, both Black and white, who assisted fugitives in various ways,” from raising funds for the abolitionist cause to taking cases to court to concealing runaways in safe houses.

Although the actual origins of the name are unknown, it was in widespread usage by the early 1840s.

Manisha Sinha, author of The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition, argues that the Underground Railroad should be referred to as the “Abolitionist Underground” rather than the “Underground Railroad” because the people who ran it “were not just ordinary, well-meaning Northern white citizens, activists, particularly in the free Black community,” she says.

See also:  How Many Slaves Were Caught From The Underground Railroad'? (Suits you)

As Foner points out, however, “the majority of the initiative, and the most of the danger, fell on the shoulders of African-Americans who were fleeing.” a portrait taken in 1894 of Harriet Jacobs, who managed to hide in an attic for nearly seven years after fleeing from slavery.

Public domain image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons “Recognizable historical events and patterns,” according to Foner, are used by Whitehead in a way that is akin to that of the late Toni Morrison.

According to Sinha, these effects may be seen throughout Cora’s journey.

According to Foner, author of the 2015 bookGateway to Freedom: The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad, “the more you know about this history, the more you can appreciate what Whitehead is doing in fusing the past and the present, or perhaps fusing the history of slavery with what happened after the end of slavery.”

What time period doesThe Underground Railroadcover?

Caesar (Aaron Pierre) and Cora (Thuso Mbedu) believe they’ve discovered a safe haven in South Carolina, but their new companions’ behaviors are based on a belief in white supremacy, as seen by their deeds. Kyle Kaplan is a producer at Amazon Studios. The Underground Railroad takes place around the year 1850, which coincides with the adoption of the Fugitive Slave Act. Runaways who had landed in free states were targeted by severe regulations, and those who supported them were subjected to heavy punishments.

In spite of the fact that it was intended to hinder the Underground Railroad, according to Foner and Sinha, the legislation actually galvanized—and radicalized—the abolitionist cause.

“Every time the individual switches to a different condition, the novel restarts,” the author explains in his introduction.

” Cora’s journey to freedom is replete with allusions to pivotal moments in post-emancipation history, ranging from the Tuskegee Syphilis Study in the mid-20th century to white mob attacks on prosperous Black communities in places like Wilmington, North Carolina (targeted in 1898), and Tulsa, Oklahoma (targeted in 1898).

According to Spencer Crew, former president of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center and emeritus director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture, this “chronological jumble” serves as a reminder that “the abolition of slavery does not herald the abolition of racism and racial attacks.” This problem has survived in many forms, with similar effects on the African American community,” says the author.

What real-life events doesThe Underground Railroaddramatize?

In Whitehead’s envisioned South Carolina, abolitionists provide newly liberated people with education and work opportunities, at least on the surface of things. However, as Cora and Caesar quickly discover, their new companions’ conviction in white superiority is in stark contrast to their kind words. (Eugenicists and proponents of scientific racism frequently articulated opinions that were similar to those espoused by these fictitious characters in twentieth-century America.) An inebriated doctor, while conversing with a white barkeep who moonlights as an Underground Railroad conductor, discloses a plan for his African-American patients: I believe that with targeted sterilization, initially for the women, then later for both sexes, we might liberate them from their bonds without worry that they would slaughter us in our sleep.

  1. “Controlled sterilization, research into communicable diseases, the perfecting of new surgical techniques on the socially unfit—was it any wonder that the best medical talents in the country were flocking to South Carolina?” the doctor continues.
  2. The state joined the Union in 1859 and ended slavery inside its borders, but it specifically incorporated the exclusion of Black people from its borders into its state constitution, which was finally repealed in the 1920s.
  3. In this image from the mid-20th century, a Tuskegee patient is getting his blood taken.
  4. There is a ban on black people entering the state, and any who do so—including the numerous former slaves who lack the financial means to flee—are murdered in weekly public rituals.
  5. The plot of land, which is owned by a free Black man called John Valentine, is home to a thriving community of runaways and free Black people who appear to coexist harmoniously with white residents on the property.
  6. An enraged mob of white strangers destroys the farm on the eve of a final debate between the two sides, destroying it and slaughtering innocent onlookers.
  7. There is a region of blackness in this new condition.” Approximately 300 people were killed when white Tulsans demolished the thriving Black enclave of Greenwood in 1921.
  8. Public domain image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons According to an article published earlier this year by Tim Madigan for Smithsonianmagazine, a similar series of events took place in the Greenwood district of Tulsa, which was known locally as “Black Wall Street,” in June 1921.
  9. Madigan pointed out that the slaughter was far from an isolated incident: “In the years preceding up to 1921, white mobs murdered African Americans on hundreds of instances in cities such as Chicago, Atlanta, Duluth, Charleston, and other places,” according to the article.

In addition, Foner explains that “he’s presenting you the variety of options,” including “what freedom may actually entail, or are the constraints on freedom coming after slavery?” “It’s about. the legacy of slavery, and the way slavery has twisted the entire civilization,” says Foner of the film.

How doesThe Underground Railroadreflect the lived experience of slavery?

In Whitehead’s envisioned South Carolina, abolitionists provide newly liberated individuals with education and work opportunities, at least on the surface of the page. However, as Cora and Caesar quickly discover, their new companions’ conviction in racial superiority is in stark contrast to the words they had said with such sweetness. The opinions conveyed by these fictional characters are reminiscent of those voiced by eugenicists and proponents of scientific racism in twentieth-century America.

  1. “Controlled sterilization, research into communicable diseases, the perfecting of new surgical techniques on the socially unfit—was it any surprise that the best medical talent in the country was flocking to South Carolina?” the doctor continues.
  2. The state joined the Union in 1859 and ended slavery inside its boundaries, but it also clearly inscribed the exclusion of Black people on its state constitution, which was only repealed in the 1920s after decades of resistance.
  3. In this image from the mid-20th century, a Tuskegee patient is shown having his blood taken.
  4. In the novel The Underground Railroad, white immigrants undertake the jobs previously performed by enslaved people in North Carolina, working off the debts incurred by their “journey, tools, and accommodation” as indentured slaves before claiming their rightful position in American culture.

According to the railroad conductor who conceals Cora in his attic, the “Freedom Trail,” a path paved with the remains of slain Black people, stretches “as far as there are bodies to feed it.” After narrowly evading the slave catcher Ridgeway at the conclusion of the tale, Cora decides to settle on a farm in Indiana.

Tensions soon rise to a boiling point, with residents disagreeing on whether they should continue to harbor fugitives at great risk to the rest of the community, or whether they should “put an end to relations with the railroad, the endless stream of needy, and ensure the longevity of the farm,” as one resident puts it.

According to Whitehead’s book, “Cora had grown to adore the improbable riches of the Valentine farm to such an extent that she’d forgotten how impossible they were.” It was too vast and too successful for the farm and the nearby ones run by colored interests.” An island of darkness in the midst of a newly created state.” In 1921, white Tulsans demolished the rich Black enclave of Greenwood, murdering over 300 individuals, according to historical estimates.

Attack on an Indiana farm is depicted in detail in the novel The Underground Railroad.

When a similar series of events transpired in the Greenwood area of Tulsa in June 1921 (also known as “Black Wall Street,” as described by Tim Madigan for Smithsonianmagazine earlier this year), it was a cause for celebration.

Moreover, as Madigan pointed out, the slaughter was not an isolated incident: The New York Times reports that “in the years preceding up to 1921, white mobs murdered African Americans on hundreds of instances in cities including Chicago, Atlanta, Duluth, Charleston, and other places.” As Sinha points out, Whitehead’s inclusion of incidents that occurred after the abolition of slavery serves to highlight the institution’s “pernicious and far-reaching tendrils.” In addition, Foner explains that “he’s showing you the variety of options,” including “what freedom may actually mean, or are the constraints on freedom coming after slavery.” “It’s about.

the legacy of slavery, and the way slavery has perverted the entire civilization,” says Foner of the film.

Words From the Past Illuminate a Station on the Way to Freedom (Published 2015)

In Whitehead’s fictional South Carolina, abolitionists provide newly liberated individuals with education and economic opportunities, at least on the surface. However, as Cora and Caesar quickly discover, their new companions’ conviction in white superiority is contrary to their kind words. (Eugenicists and proponents of scientific racism frequently articulated opinions similar to those espoused by these fictitious characters in twentieth-century America.) A intoxicated doctor, while conversing with a white barkeep who also happens to be an Underground Railroad conductor, discloses a plan for his Black patients: “With targeted sterilization—first the women, then both sexes in due course—we could liberate them from bondage without worry that they’d slaughter us in our sleep.” “Controlled sterilization, research into communicable diseases, the perfecting of new surgical techniques on the socially unfit—was it any surprise that the best medical talents in the country were flocking to South Carolina?” the doctor continues.

“Was it any surprise that the best medical talents in the country were flocking to South Carolina?” Whitehead’s reality contains a North Carolina that is an all-white state that has prohibited slavery as well as the sheer presence of any Black residents—a dystopia that has overtones of nineteenth-century Oregon.

  1. Whitehead’s envisioned image of South Carolina is reminiscent of the unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Study, which took place in the state.
  2. Wikimedia Commons has made this image available to the public.
  3. Black people are prohibited from entering the state, and any who do so—including the numerous previously enslaved persons who lack the financial means to depart North Carolina—are murdered in weekly public rituals.
  4. The plot of property, which is owned by a free Black man named John Valentine, is home to a thriving colony of runaways and free Black people who appear to coexist harmoniously alongside white settlers.
  5. On the day of the final discussion between the two sides, a mob of white strangers assaults the farm, burning it to the ground and slaughtering innocent bystanders.
  6. There is a pocket of blackness in this fledgling state,” says the author.
  7. The Underground Railroaddescribes a similar (but fictitious) raid on a farm in Indiana.
  8. According to an article published earlier this year by Tim Madigan for Smithsonianmagazine, a similar series of incidents took place in the Greenwood district of Tulsa, which was known as “Black Wall Street” at the time.

According to Madigan, the slaughter was far from an isolated incident: “In the years preceding up to 1921, white mobs murdered African Americans on hundreds of instances in cities such as Chicago, Atlanta, Duluth, Charleston, and elsewhere.” The inclusion of incidents that occurred after the abolition of slavery highlights the institution’s “pernicious and far-reaching tendrils,” according to Sinha.

“He’s giving you the range of possibilities,” says Foner, “what freedom may actually mean, or are the limits to freedom coming after slavery?” “It’s about. the legacy of slavery, and the way slavery has corrupted the entire civilization,” adds Foner.

The Underground Railroad – Book Review

At first look, Whitehead’s envisioned South Carolina appears to be a progressive sanctuary where abolitionists provide newly liberated people with education and economic opportunities. However, as Cora and Caesar quickly discover, their new companions’ conviction in white superiority is in direct contradiction to their kind words. (In twentieth-century America, eugenicists and proponents of scientific racism frequently articulated opinions that were similar to those espoused by these fictitious characters.) A intoxicated doctor, while chatting with a white barkeep who also happens to be an Underground Railroad conductor, announces a plan for his Black patients: “By strategically sterilizing them—first the women, then both sexes at the appropriate time—we could liberate them from bondage without concern that they’d slaughter us in our sleep.” “Controlled sterilization, research into infectious illnesses, the perfecting of new surgical procedures on the socially unfit—was it any wonder that the top medical talents in the country were coming to South Carolina?” the doctor says.

  1. North Carolina, on the other hand, exists in Whitehead’s reality as an all-white state that has prohibited slavery as well as the sheer presence of any Black residents—a dystopia that has overtones of nineteenth-century Oregon.
  2. Whitehead’s envisioned depiction of South Carolina is reminiscent of the unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Study.
  3. The image is in the public domain, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
  4. Black people are prohibited from entering the state, and any who do so—including the numerous previously enslaved persons who lack the financial means to flee the state—are hanged in weekly public rituals.
  5. The parcel of land is owned by a free Black man named John Valentine, and it is home to a thriving colony of runaways and free Black people who appear to coexist harmoniously alongside white settlers.
  6. “Cora had come to appreciate the improbable gifts of the Valentine farm so thoroughly that she’d forgotten how impossible they were,” writes Whitehead in the novel.
  7. “There is a pocket of darkness in this nascent state.” In 1921, white Tulsans demolished the rich Black enclave of Greenwood, killing around 300 people.
  8. The image is in the public domain, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.
  9. Afraid of the prosperity of Black inhabitants, some 10,000 white Tulsans launched a savage attack on Greenwood, murdering as many as 300 people and razing the thriving area to the ruins.
See also:  How Long Was Harriet Tubman The Conductor Of The Underground Railroad? (Perfect answer)

“In the years preceding up to 1921, white mobs murdered African Americans on hundreds of instances in Chicago, Atlanta, Duluth, Charleston, and other cities.” According to Sinha, Whitehead’s inclusion of events that occurred after the abolition of slavery highlights the institution’s “pernicious and far-reaching tendrils.” “He’s showing you the spectrum of possibilities,” Foner continues, “what freedom may actually mean, or are the limits to freedom coming after slavery?” “It’s about.

the legacy of slavery, and the way slavery has corrupted the entire civilization,” Foner explains.

Colson Whitehead tells the story behind the ‘Underground Railroad’

While in fourth grade, Colson Whitehead heard about the Underground Railroad, an initiative to assist slaves in the nineteenth century in their journey from slavery to freedom through a network of people, routes, and houses. Whitehead was under the impression that the railroad was a real railroad, with trains surreptitiously running on rails in subterranean tunnels to transport slaves to freedom, which was not the case. His teacher corrected him, but the image of the incident remained in his memory.

  • According to him, the plot would have a protagonist who would go north on a true subterranean train, stopping in each state along the route and encountering some fresh adventure.
  • Although the concept intrigued him, he was terrified by it and didn’t feel he was ready to explore it in a novel, either from a technical or emotional aspect.
  • Each time, he came to the conclusion that he was not yet prepared to do honor to the subject.
  • When he began thinking about his next novel three years ago, he finally had the courage to share his thoughts with people.
  • The answer was overwhelmingly positive and convincing: it was time to start writing the manuscript.
  • Among many other distinctions, the book was named the winner of the 2016 National Book Award for Fiction and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence from the American Library Association, as well as a pick for Oprah Winfrey’s elite book club.
  • The lecture took place at the Lecture Hall of the James Branch Cabell Library.

An actual railroad, underground

It is the story of Cora, a teenage slave who escapes from her Georgia plantation with her companion, Caesar, and travels north via an underground railway system composed of tracks and tunnels, as told by Whitehead in his novel The Underground Railroad. Cora and Caesar are pursued by a merciless slave-catcher throughout their journey, and they must overcome a lot of obstacles and hazards. Whitehead employs a huge cast of people and alternates between a selection of them in order to convey their viewpoints and inner lives, while never losing sight of Cora’s horrific escape from the house.

  1. Jones’ “The Known World,” and Charles Johnson’s “Middle Passage” before entering into his own work.
  2. Toni Morrison is “an extraordinary intellect,” he stated, adding that he “can’t really compete with that.” “It doesn’t matter what you’re writing about; all that matters is that you have something unique to say about the subject,” he said.
  3. During the course of writing the novel, Whitehead discovered that he became increasingly obsessed with making a work that was sufficient to approximate the experiences that his ancestors and other slaves had gone through.
  4. As a result of the subject matter, the book is cruel, although Whitehead maintains that it represents “just a ten-millionth of one percent of what they truly went through.” “I knew that this was something my family had to go through,” Whitehead added.
  5. I have no idea what they were working on, how they lived, or how they suffered.

I did everything I could to testify on their behalf and on behalf of other persons who had been subjected to slavery. The bigger concern was the combination of the fear of losing my influence and the fear of attempting to portray the actual reality and severity of what my family went through.”

‘In some ways, we haven’t come far’

Whitehead claims that if he had written the work when he was younger, the outcome would have been drastically different. For example, the fanciful aspects would have been larger and displayed more prominently in the front if the changes had been made. He said that one of the states was initially intended to take place in the future. The spectacular was instead turned down from “a Spinal Tappian 11 down to 1,” as he put it. The train has shifted from being the focal point of the plot to becoming a vital instrument for transporting Cora from one state to another.

In fact, “the final 20 pages are the greatest writing I’ve ever done,” says the author.

His observations of the parallels have grown stronger since then, and he has begun to recognize certain justifications that slaveowners and slavecatchers used for their harsh, heavy-handed practices — even when dealing with freed blacks — in the language that is used today to justify race-based discriminatory practices.

Early forays into writing

In addition to talking about his current work, Whitehead reflected on his childhood and the route that lead him to becoming an author, frequently with the shrewd timing of a seasoned stand-up comic, which was a treat for the audience. “I was a little bit of a shut-in,” he recounted of his upbringing in New York City. I would have wanted to have been born as a sickly child, but that did not turn out to be the case. Whenever you read a biography of someone such as James Joyce, it will mention that they were a sickly child who was forced to retire into a realm of imagination.

Instead, I just didn’t care for going out in the cold.” Even as a kid, Whitehead saw the allure of a career in writing.

‘In sixth grade, I realized that writing X-Men or Spiderman comic books might be a rewarding career.’ If you were a writer, you could work from the comfort of your own home, without having to dress or interact with others.

In his own words, “I really wanted to write the black “Shining” or the black “Salem’s Lot,” as Whitehead put it.

That’s essentially what I intended to do.” As he broadened his reading interests, Whitehead came across writers who were able to incorporate elements of genre into literary fiction in a way that he found exciting and that drew strong connections to the science fiction and horror that he had grown up reading.

According to him, these authors were just as much a part of the fantastic as any other genre writer.

Although Whitehead considered himself a writer in college, he didn’t actually sit down and write anything, which is obviously an important part of the process, according to Whitehead.

Finally, I summoned up the energy to compose two five-page epics, which I used as auditions for creative writing workshops, for which I was rejected by both of the institutions where I applied.

“I was in a condition of complete devastation, which served as excellent training for my future career as a writer.”

‘I got back to work’

As part of the conversation, Whitehead shared memories of his childhood and the route that lead him to becoming an author, often with the shrewd timing of a veteran stand-up comic. “I was a bit of a shut-in” throughout his upbringing in Manhattan, he remembered. Having been born as a sickly child would have been preferable, but unfortunately, that was not to be the case! Someone like James Joyce, for example, will be described as a sickly youngster who was forced to withdraw into a realm of fantasy in their biography.

It was more that I didn’t care for going outside.” When Whitehead was a youngster, he saw the allure of a career as a writer.

” You might work from home as a writer and avoid having to put on clothes or interact with other people.

In his student years at Harvard, Whitehead became more interested in pursuing a writing career – albeit his initial thoughts were quite limited in scope.

Any Stephen King title may be made better by adding the phrase “in the black.” In essence, that’s exactly what I had in mind.” He encountered writers that exploited genre in literary fiction in a way that he found exciting and that he felt had clear connections to the science fiction and horror that he had devoured as a youngster as he broadened his reading choices.

As far as he was concerned, these authors were engaging in great storytelling in the same way that any other genre writer would.

Although Whitehead considered himself a writer in college, he didn’t really sit down and write anything, which is evidently required as part of the process.

“I was in a condition of complete and utter despair, which served me well as writing practice.”

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