What Country Was Home To The World’s Second Oldest Underground Railroad? (Professionals recommend)

Budapest Metro is the oldest electrified underground railways system in Europe and serves the Hungarian capital Budapest. The metro system is the second oldest electrically operated system in the world.

What is the oldest underground railway line in the world?

  • Istanbul ‘s Tünel (F2) which was opened in 1875, second-oldest extant subterranean urban rail line in the world, after the London Underground (1863). It is thus the oldest surviving underground urban rail line in continental Europe, as the older 1862 funicular line in Lyon has been converted into an underground road tunnel.

Where is the oldest underground railroad?

London and the world’s oldest subways (1863) The underground or tube in London is the oldest transport system of its kind in the world. It opened on 10th January 1863 with steam locomotives.

What is the oldest underground station in the world?

The oldest underground stations: Metropolitan Line, London The honour of oldest underground station belongs to the UK’s largest city, and an underground railway that’s a cultural icon in itself. The London Underground, or the Tube as it’s known the world over, opened during Queen Victoria’s reign in 1863.

What is the world’s largest underground railway?

Seoul Subway, South Korea Seoul subway serving the Seoul Metropolitan Area is the longest subway system in the world. The total route length of the system extended as far as 940km as of 2013.

Who invented the first underground railway?

Marc Brunel and son Isambard Kingdom Brunel built the Thames Tunnel as a foot tunnel in 1843, but by 1869 enough money had been raised from visiting tourists to develop it into a transport cargo right under the Thames river.

When was the first underground built?

The rest of the top five come from all over the globe: Shanghai Metro in China, Tokyo Metro in Japan, Mexico City Metro and the London Underground. The lowest scoring were the Paris Metro, Beijing Subway and the Moscow Metro.

What is the oldest railway line?

The Middleton Railway in Leeds, which was built in 1758, later became the world’s oldest operational railway (other than funiculars), albeit now in an upgraded form. In 1764, the first railway in America was built in Lewiston, New York.

Where was the first railroad in the United States?

The first railroad track in the United States was only 13 miles long, but it caused a lot of excitement when it opened in 1830. Charles Carroll, the last surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence, laid the first stone when construction on the track began at Baltimore harbor on July 4, 1828.

Where was the second underground railway built?

The Glasgow Subway is the second oldest subway system in the United Kingdom, after the London Underground. The Scottish railway first opened in 1896 and was built and initially named for the Glasgow District Subway Company.

What European city has the oldest underground system?

Originally opened between Paddington and Farringdon Street in 1863, the London Underground in the UK is the oldest metro in Europe and the world. Also the world’s first underground metro system, the Metropolitan Railway was operational between 1863 and 1933 until it was merged with the London Passenger Transport Board.

The world’s second oldest underground railway?

The London Subterranean is often regarded as the world’s oldest underground train system – but which other system came in second? That honor goes to the T14nel, which is located in Istanbul, Turkey’s capital. Because it is just 571 meters in length and has only two stops, it is also considered to be the world’s shortest subterranean railway system. The T14nel, which will be 133 years old next Friday, was built to connect the two areas of Pera and Galata, which are both located on the hill north of the GoldenHorn in Istanbul’s new district, by providing a convenient means of transportation.

A funicular railway is one that you are undoubtedly familiar with because of its use in the Alpine highlands.

On November 6, 1869, he received permission from the Ottoman sultan Abd14laziz to begin work on the project, which he completed two years later.

On January 17, 1875, the T1nel was officially inaugurated and put into operation.

  1. It was originally powered by horses when it was built, but it was switched to electric wire in 1910, and then to electric rail and locomotion in 1971, when it was completed.
  2. The Funicular Blog Istanbul Transportwebsite has a detailed history as well as photographs.
  3. This website has been up and running for a little more than a decade, and while advertising money helps to sustain the website, it does not completely cover its operating expenses.
  4. A much like the way The Guardian and many smaller websites are currently attempting to create income in the face of growing costs and diminishing advertising revenue.
  5. It doesn’t matter whether you make a one-time payment or a recurring contribution; any little of extra help goes a long way toward covering the costs of maintaining this website and ensuring that you receive regular doses of London-related news and information.
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The World’s Oldest Metro Systems

In terms of speed and convenience, the London Underground is unquestionably the best mode of transportation across the ancient city of London. Metro systems, also known as subways, U-Bahns, or subterranean electrified rapid transit train systems, are found all over the world. There are more than 160 metro systems in 157 cities spread over more than 50 nations throughout the world as of 2014. The London Underground, the world’s first metro system, was first inaugurated as an underground railway in 1863, making it the world’s oldest metro system.

The Shanghai Metro has the greatest route length, while the Beijing Subway is the busiest metro system in the world. Some of the world’s oldest metro systems include the ones in the following countries:

Some Of The Oldest And Grandest Metro Systems In The World

In the ancient metropolis of London, the London Underground is without a doubt the quickest and most convenient mode of transportation. Subterranean electrified rapid transit train systems, often known as subways, U-Bahns, or underground rapid transit train systems, are found across the world. There are more than 160 metro systems in 157 cities spread over more than 50 nations in the world as of 2014. Underground railways were first used as a mode of transportation in 1863, when the London Underground became the world’s first metro system.

Among metro systems, Shanghai Metro has the greatest route length, whilst Beijing Subway is the busiest.

Budapest

Budapest Metro is the world’s first electric subterranean railway system, and it serves the Hungarian capital of Budapest. It was inaugurated in 1896. Metro is the second-oldest electrically operated system in the world, after the London Underground. The metro system, which first opened its doors in 1896, was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2002. The metro system is divided into four lines, each with a different color and number designation, including yellow, red, blue, and green.

The first metro line in Budapest was built in 1894 as a way of transporting passengers from the city center to the City Park.

The four lines have undergone extensive construction and renovation in recent years, with a plan to add a fifth line (the Purple line) to the metro system in the near future.

Glasgow

The Glasgow Subway is a metro line in Glasgow, Scotland, that first opened its doors in 1896. The metro system is the third-oldest in the world, trailing only the London and Budapest metro systems in longevity. Except for the London Underground, the Glasgow Subway is the only heavy rail underground metro system in the United Kingdom that works totally underground. It is also the only metro system in the United Kingdom that operates entirely underground. Before it was electrified, the subway system was first operated as a cable train.

Despite the fact that grandiose plans for the development of the metro system have been announced, the system has not been extended beyond its initial course.

Chicago

The Chicago L, also known as the Chicago Elevated, is a public transportation system that serves the city of Chicago and its surrounding suburbs. It has a total route length of 102.8 miles, making it the fourth biggest metro system in the United States. The Chicago Transit Authority is in charge of running the metro system. Parts of the Chicago L’s network are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The Chicago Metropolitan Transportation System (Metro) commenced operations in 1892 and has been attributed with the city’s fast expansion.

Every workday, the quick system transports an average of 750,000 passengers every hour. The Clinton Street Subway and the Airport Express are two examples of future transportation system extensions that have been identified.

Future Of Metros

While metro systems are mostly found in urban areas, other modes of transportation such as buses and trains may be found across the country. Generally speaking, the total length of all routes covered by a metro system is defined as the total length of all routes covered by the metro system with each route being counted only once, regardless of how many lines run through it. Over 50 metro systems are now under development throughout the world, with a handful of them projected to open as early as 2020.

The World’s Oldest Metro Systems

Rank City System Year of opening
1 London Underground 1890
2 Budapest Metro 1896
3 Glasgow Subway 1896
4 Chicago L 1897
5 Paris Metro 1900
6 Boston Subway 1901
7 Berlin U-Bahn 1902
8 Athens Metro 1904
9 New York Subway 1904
10 Philadelphia SEPTA 1907
11 Hamburg U-Bahn 1912
12 Buenos Aires Underground 1913
13 Madrid Metro 1919
14 Barcelona Metro 1924
15 Tokyo Metro 1927
16 Osaka Subway 1933
17 Moscow Metro 1935
18 Stockholm Metro 1950
19 Toronto Subway 1954
20 Rome Metro 1955

10 Oldest Subway Systems in the World (Updated 2021)

All of the world’s major cities have some form of public transportation system, with many of them utilising a combination of subways, buses, light rails, and high-speed trains. Subway systems were initially introduced in the nineteenth century as a means of meeting the expanding need for transportation. It was a brilliant idea to put railways underground in order to let more people travel about without taking up valuable city area. All of the subway systems in this list have been in operation for more than a century and are still in operation.

10. Buenos Aires Underground

Founded on December 1, 1913, in Washington, D.C. Buenos Aires, Argentina is the location served. Lines in the poem: seven the total number of stations is 104 The length of the system is 35.2 miles (56.7 km) Ridership on an annual basis: Unspecified – daily ridership in 2018 was 1.38 million a photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and Wmtribe2015 The Buenos Aires Underground, which initially opened its doors in 1913, was the world’s first subway system to serve Latin America and the Spanish-speaking world at the time.

For a metropolis the size of Buenos Aires, the Underground system is very tiny, covering only 34.1 miles in total (54.9 kilometers).

In common with all of the other subway systems in this list, the Buenos Aires Underground grew significantly during the first few decades after it was established.

In response to overpopulation and the ever-increasing transport demands of its inhabitants, the city of Buenos Aires has announced plans to renovate and extend its underground system in the next years.

Did You Know?

On December 1, 1913, the city of Chicago was officially established. Buenos Aires, Argentina is the location of the service. Lines in the poem: seven. Stations in total: 104. Approximately 35.2 miles in total length (56.7 km) Number of riders per year: Unknown – daily ridership in 2018 was 1.38 million image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and Wmtribe2015. It was the first subway system in Latin America and the Spanish-speaking world to be built when the Buenos Aires Underground initially opened its doors in 1913.

Aside from that, Buenos Aires is the only city in Argentina to be served by a metro.

As late as 2007, modest extensions have been made to the Underground’s major lines, which had been finished by 1944. With overcrowding and the ever-increasing transit demands of its inhabitants, the city of Buenos Aires aims to renovate and extend its subway system in future years.

9. Hamburg U-Bahn

Month and year of establishment: February 15, 1912. Germany’s Hamburg, Norderstedy, Ahrensburg, and Großhansdorf are among the cities served. There are four lines in all. The number of stations is 93. 66.1 miles is the total length of the system (106.4 km) Ridership on an annual basis: 242.5 million (2017 numbers) picture credit: Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Jivee Blau A decade after Germany’s first subway system, theHamburg U-Bahnor metro system was built in 1912. The U-Bahnor metro system was founded in 1912.

A connection exists between the city’s U-Bahn system and the S-Bahn, which is Hamburg’s above-ground train system.

In the aftermath of World War II, the Hamburg U-Bahn system was severely damaged, and repairs and expansions were carried out throughout the course of the next few decades.

Did You Know?

Jungfernstieg was the first Hamburg U-Bahn station to be equipped with escalators, and it opened its doors on April 28, 1934.

8. New York City Subway

Month and year of establishment: October 27, 1904. New York City (including the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Queens), New York, USA is the service area. The number of lines is 36. (1 planned) The total number of stations is 472. (14 planned) 850 miles is the total length of the system (1,370 km) Ridership in a single year: 1,727,366,607 (2017 numbers) a photograph courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and Mtattrain While the New York City Subway is one of the most well-known and widely utilized subway systems in the world, it was not the first subway system in the United States — that honor goes to the Boston subway system, which debuted in 1897 and has been in operation ever since.

The first official subway station in New York City opened its doors on October 27, 1904, and it swiftly grew to become the greatest public transit system in the United States.

Despite the fact that the New York City Subway was fully built by the mid-20th century, additions to the system have been suggested almost since the day it first opened in order to ease congestion and other restraints on riders.

Did You Know?

Date of foundation: October 27, 1904. New York City (including the Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, and Queens), New York, United States Lines in the poem: 36 (1 planned) 472, to be exact, are available (14 planned) 850 miles is the total distance of the system (1,370 km) 1,727,366,607 ridership per year (2017 numbers) image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and Mtattrain. As well as being one of the most well-known and widely utilized subway systems in the world, the New York City Subway was unexpected in that it was not the first subway system in the United States — that honor goes to the Boston subway system, which opened its doors in 1897.

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It is estimated that almost 2 billion passengers utilize the New York City Subway each year, making it the world’s busiest system in number of stations (472, with 14 more planned).

The city has seen an increase in the number of stations in recent years.

7. Berlin U-Bahn

The year when the company was founded was 1902. Berlin, Germany is the service area. There are nine lines in all. There are 175 stations in all. The system has a length of 94.3 miles (151.7 km) Ridership on an annual basis: 553.1 million picture credit: Wikimedia Commons courtesy of Jivee Blau TheU-Bahn (U-Bahn) in Berlin is the oldest subway system in Germany, with the first line opening its doors in 1902. This initial railway line was mostly elevated, with just a small portion of it being subterranean.

Following its introduction, the U-Bahn quickly gained popularity, and the system was enlarged during the early 1900s.

Following the construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961, parts of the U-lines Bahn’s were divided and many stops were abandoned.

Did You Know?

Incorporated in the year 1902. Berlin, Germany is the geographic area served. Lines in the poem: nine 175 stations are located across the city. 95.43 miles is the total distance covered by the system (151.7 km) Ridership: 553.1 million passengers per year on average source: Wikimedia Commons through Jivee Blau, with permission It was established in 1902, and it is the world’s oldest subway system. The Berlin U-Bahn is Germany’s oldest subway system. Only a small portion of this original railway line was subterranean; the rest was raised.

Following its introduction, the U-Bahn quickly gained popularity, leading to its expansion throughout the early 1900s.

Several U-Bahn lines were separated and numerous stations were abandoned after the Berlin Wall was constructed in 1961.

6. Paris Métro

The year when the company was founded was July 19, 1900. France’s Paris metropolitan region is served by this company. The number of lines is sixteen. 304 total stations are available. The length of the system is 139.9 miles (225.1 km) Ridership on an annual basis: 1.520 billion (2015 numbers) Ardfern obtained this image from Wikimedia Commons. The Paris Métro system was officially inaugurated during the 1900 World’s Fair. The first line of the Paris Métro linked all of the city’s major attractions together in one convenient location.

In part due to the fact that Paris is a highly populated and vast city, the Paris Métro (subway system) is one of the busiest in the world, transporting an estimated 4 million passengers every day.

The Paris Métro, which serves as the city’s lifeblood and one of the city’s icons, was exquisitely built, with its entrances featuring Art Nouveau architecture that is unlike anything else in the world. Additionally, art is used to embellish the stations, which are frequently themed.

Did You Know?

One of the most intriguing parts of the Paris Métro is its “ghost stations,” which are stations that have been abandoned for decades since many of them were utilized as bomb shelters during World War II. One of the most fascinating aspects of the Paris Métro is its “ghost stations.” While the ghost stations are currently closed to the public, they have piqued the interest of both locals and tourists, and there are plans to reopen some of them for economic and cultural purposes in the future.

5. MBTA Subway

Month and year of establishment: September 1, 1897 Boston, Massachusetts is the service area. The number of lines is three. There are 148 stations in all (7 in construction) 65.1 miles is the total length of the system (104.8 km) Ridership totaled 352,519,591 per year (2014 numbers) photo courtesy of Flickr user ericodeg While it may come as a surprise, the first subway system in the United States did not open in New York City; rather, the first and oldest subway system in the United States is located in Boston, Massachusetts, according to Wikipedia.

Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s Subway system has been in operation since 1897.

Despite its age, the Tremont Street Subway continues to be utilized today to link the Government Center station with the Park Street and Boylston stations.

Did You Know?

A song composed for mayoral candidate Walter A. O’Brien, Jr. in 1949, “Charlie on the MTA,” inspired the present fare system of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). The CharlieCard and CharlieTicket are the names of the current MBTA fare system. Because he was unable to pay the departure fee, the titular Charlie found himself trapped on an interminable train trip.

4. Glasgow Subway

December 14, 1896 was the date of the organization’s founding. Glasgow, Scotland is the service area. There are only one line in this paragraph. The number of stations is 15 in total. Length of System: 6.5 mi (10.5 km) Ridership on an annual basis: 12.7 million (2019/20 figures). photo credit: Wikimedia Commons courtesy of calflier001 It is the second oldest underground system in the United Kingdom, behind the London Underground, and it serves the city of Glasgow. The Glasgow District Subway Company was responsible for the construction and initial naming of the Scottish railway, which first opened its doors in 1896.

It took another ten years before the Glasgow Subway was converted to electrical propulsion.

Despite the fact that the Glasgow Subway is lower in size than the other subways on this list, it has not seen significant renovation since the late 1970s/early 1980s. The stations of the Glasgow Subway were upgraded during this period.

Did You Know?

There are just a few railways in the world that run on a track running gauge of 4 ft (1,219 mm), which is significantly smaller than the normal gauge of 4 feet 8.5 inches. The Glasgow Subway is among them (1435 mm).

3. Budapest Metro

Year the company was founded: 1896 Budapest, Hungary is the location served. There are four lines in all. The number of stations is 48. 24.7 miles is the total length of the system (39.7 km) Ridership on an annual basis: 409.3 million (2017 numbers) Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and Sprok.com TheBudapest Metro, like many of the subway systems in this list, is a single line that was constructed in the late nineteenth century. In spite of the fact that Istanbul’s Tünel is roughly a decade older, many people believe Budapest, Hungary’s M1 line to be the continent’s oldest metro network.

As Budapest evolved, so did its subway system, which was expanded with the addition of the M2 and M3 lines in the 1970s and the M4 line, which opened in 2014.

Did You Know?

One of the secrets of the Budapest Metro’s Line 2 is a secret bunker that is buried between the Kossuth tér and Deák Ferenc tér subway stations. The bunker, which was constructed in the 1950s during the construction of the M2 highway, was immediately connected to the Hungarian Parliament.

2. Istanbul Metro

In the early 1870s, a line known as the Tünel was built through Istanbul, which was the beginning of the city’s metro system. The Tünel line was the first of seven lines that were built through Istanbul, with six more under construction. The system has 104 stations and is 82.6 miles (133 kilometers) long. The annual ridership is 495 million (2019 figures). The Tünel was finished in 1874 and officially opened its doors to the public on December 5, 1874. Tünel has continued in service since then, making it the second-oldest subway system in the world.Following on the success of the Tünel line, ideas for a comprehensive metro network in Istanbul began to emerge in the early twentieth century.

In 1989, the first phase of the current Istanbul Metro system was completed, and construction has proceeded on the system ever since.

Did You Know?

The first phase of the Istanbul Metro, which included the Tünel, did not become nationalized until 1939. Previously, the transportation services in Istanbul were provided by a number of different foreign corporations.

1. London Underground

The London Underground has been in operation since January 1863, when the Metropolitan Railway (now known as the Metropolitan Line) first opened its doors in the London region, Buckinghamshire, Essex, and Hertfordshire (England). There are 11 lines and 270 stations, and the system has a length of 250 miles (402 kilometers). Annual ridership is 1.357 billion (2017/2018 figures), according to Wikipedia. The London Underground is not only the world’s oldest subway system, but it was also the world’s first underground railway when it was built over the course of 50 years in the late nineteenth century.

The majority of the central London network was completed during the Underground’s first 50 years in the late nineteenth century. London’s underground system grew in size and reach into the city’s suburbs over the first half of the twentieth century.

Did You Know?

Each train utilized by the London Underground travels around 114,500 miles (about 35 kilometers) every year, which is equivalent to almost 4.6 complete rotations of the earth.

The 10 Oldest Subways in the World

Each train that runs on the London Underground travels around 114,500 miles (about 35 kilometers) every year, which is equivalent to almost 4.6 complete rotations of the Earth.

London and the world’s oldest subways (1863)

In London, there is an underground sign near to Big Ben. The underground, often known as the tube, in London is the world’s oldest public transportation system of its sort. It first opened its doors on the 10th of January, 1863, using steam locomotives. You can get everywhere in the city via the city’s subterranean network, which has 408 kilometers of operational lines and is 408 kilometers in length. The London Transport Museum is a must-see if you want to learn more interesting information about one of the world’s oldest subway systems.

The Istanbul Tunnel (1875)

The Tunnel of Istanbul is a historical landmark. The Tünel was the world’s first subterranean railway system, and it was built in continental Europe. Since its inception in 1875, this trailblazer has carried more than 12 thousand people each and every day despite its tiny journey of 573 metres. Please pay a visit while you are in Istanbul on your next vacation; the entire journey will just take you 90 seconds! You may also want to take advantage of the opportunity to visit Cappadocia.

Chicago ‘L’ (1892)

The Chicago ‘L’ station’s exterior. Do you know why the Chicago’L’ is considered to be one of the world’s oldest subway systems? Because it first opened its doors on June 6, 1892, at the tail end of the nineteenth century! In fact, the word “elevated” is derived from the word “elevated,” as there are sections of the railway that reach close to the surface. Approximately 600,000 people use it on a weekly average, making it the third busiest subway system in the United States. This subway system will undoubtedly be used to explore all of the city’s attractions if you have acquired the Chicago Explorer Pass.

Glasgow Circular Underground (1896)

The Glasgow Circular Underground is a public transportation system that runs around the city. The GlasgowMetropolitan Railway, one of the world’s oldest subway systems, commenced operations in 1896 with the opening of the lone line. Currently, this network is only available to members of the elite club. If you’re in the region, you must make the trek to Loch Ness–will you be seeing the mythical beast, or will you just be passing through?

Budapest’s historic metro line (1896)

Budapest’s public transportation system In total, there are 52 stations and just four lines in theBudapestmetro system. What is it about the Budapest metro system that makes it so unique? UNESCO designated Line 1 as a World Heritage Site in 2002, after it was first opened to the public in 1896.

Some stations still feature décor that will transport you to a different time period. If you plan to visit this Danube-side city, we propose that you take a guided tour of its most famous attractions.

The Paris Metropolitain (1900)

In Paris, there is a metro entrance with iron features. Traveling around the ‘city of love’ via the métropolitain deParis (Paris subway system), one of the world’s oldest metro systems, is the most efficient method to see the major landmarks. As a result of the Art Nouveau movement’s effect on the construction of the first line, which opened on the 19th of July 1900, a number of wrought-iron stations were built during its early years. If you’re interested in learning more about the historic center, you can sign up for a fascinating free tour–you’ll be sure to like it!

The Berlin U-Bahn (1902)

This is the inside of a Berlin subway station. The U-Bahn has a top speed of 72 kilometers per hour, 175 stops, and a track length of over 150 kilometers. The history of this network, which began operations in 1902 and has seen several changes, is extensive. During World War II, it was utilized as a bunker, and from 1945 until 1989, East Berlin residents were denied access to the city’s subterranean networks.

New York, the subway that never closes (1904)

Station Times Square is located in Manhattan. If you’ve ever been to the “Big Apple,” it’s almost certain that you’ve had your photo taken with the subway sign. The New York subway system, which originally opened its doors in 1904, is one of the world’s oldest in terms of age. It was constructed by 30,000 employees and was utilized by 127,381 persons on its maiden day of operation. If you want to see prominent monuments such as theEmpire State Building or theMoMA, you’ll have to take use of this transportation system.

The Philadelphia SEPTA (1907)

Station in Times Square It is almost certain that if you have ever visited the “Big Apple,” you have had your photo taken with the subway symbol. The New York City subway system, which originally opened its doors in 1904, is one of the world’s oldest. Over 30,000 people worked on its construction, and it was utilized by 127,381 people on its first operational day. You’ll need to use this transportation system if you want to see prominent monuments like the Empire State Building or the Museum of Modern Art.

Madrid Metro (1919)

Madrid’s Gran Va metro station entrance The Gran Va, the Sol, the La Latina, the Moncloa. These emblems of Madrid may be seen simply taking public transportation. The capital is home to one of the world’s oldest metro systems, as well as the oldest in Spain. It was launched by King Alfonso XIII on October 17, 1919, and it marked a significant shift in the rhythm of life for the inhabitants of Madrid at the time. Visitors to the city should make a point of seeing the abandoned Chamber station.

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World’s oldest metro systems

The London Underground, which has been in operation since 1890, is the world’s oldest metro system by a long shot. Image courtesy of tompagenet / WikiCommons.

London Underground

Because it began running services in 1890, the London Underground is the world’s oldest metro system.

Tompagenet / WikiCommons is credited with this image.

Budapest Metro

The London Underground, which has been in operation since 1890, is the world’s oldest metro system. Photograph courtesy of tompagenet / WikiCommons.

Glasgow Subway

The Glasgow Subway, located in Scotland, is the world’s third-oldest metro system, having first opened its doors in December of 1896. As one of the world’s few metro systems that has not been expanded beyond its initial path, it operates over a 10.5-kilometer subterranean circle in the city of Tokyo. “A number of upgrading works are being carried out throughout the subway system as part of the largest project conducted by the system in 30 years.” Every year, the system transports around 13 million passengers through it.

An unintentional carriage collision at the end of the first day of service resulted in four injuries and the network was forced to suspend operations.

In the course of the subway system’s greatest project in 30 years, a variety of upgrades are being carried out throughout the system.

Chicago ‘L’

The Chicago elevated ‘L’ metro system in Illinois, United States, began running as an electrified system in 1897 and has been in operation ever since. It is the second busiest metro system in the United States, with 230.2 million passengers in 2017. On two lines of the network, there is a 24-hour service available, which is only offered on four other rapid transit systems in the country, according to the company. In the city center, the network is roughly 165 kilometers long and has eight lines, including a loop via which services can be routed or circled in order to return to their originating place.

There have been several alterations to the Loop’s stations, the most recent of which being the closing of Randolph / Wabash and Madison / Wabash stations, which were replaced by the Washington / Wabash station in August of this year.

Paris Métro

The Paris Métro system first opened its doors on July 19, 1900, in France. When it initially opened, it was one of the first public transportation systems to adopt the term “metro,” which was an abbreviation of the company’s original operational name, “Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris” (Compagnie du chemin de fer métropolitain de Paris). In 2016, over 1.52 billion people rode the Paris Métro system. On the 214km-long network, there are 16 lines with a total of 302 stops. It takes an average of 548m to walk between them, and many of them are within a short walking distance of one another in the city center.

Stations of the Paris Métro system are noted for their Art Nouveau architecture, and 83 of the original entrances are still in use today.

Building the metro system began in 1898, utilizing a cut-and-cover process that allowed the track to be buried beneath the city’s streets.

Paris’ inner suburbs were not reached until the 1930s, with Line 9 reaching Boulogne-Billancourt in 1934, the year the lines were completed. As a result of the Second World War, planned expansions were put on hold, which resulted in a number of train stations being shut down.

MBTA Subway

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is responsible for the operation of passenger bus, light rail, and heavy rail services in Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America. Three primary lines serve the subway system, and the first electrified rapid transit line, currently known as the Orange Line, was built in 1901. Until its elevated parts began to be dismantled in the 1920s, the Boston Elevated Railway served as the primary Orange Line route in Boston. The line was renamed after the Metropolitan Transit Authority, subsequently known as the MBTA, took over operations in 1964 and implemented a color-coded system for identifying passengers.

It is also the shortest of the three lines, having been built in 1904.

The Green Line, a light rail subterranean line that began operation in 1987 and runs through the Tremont Street Subway, was the system’s debut service offering.

Berlin U-Bahn

A public transportation system in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, operated by the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA). Three primary lines serve the subway system, and the first electrified rapid transit line, which is now known as the Orange Line, was built in 1901 and opened to the public. Until its elevated parts began to be dismantled in the 1920s, the Boston Elevated Railway was the original Orange Line. In 1964, when the Metropolitan Transit Authority, subsequently known as the MBTA, took over operations and implemented the color-coded system, the line was renamed.

It has been planned several times since the 1940s, but no work has been begun on the line to connect it to the city of Lynn.

It is still in operation today.

Athens Metro

The Athens Metro is a public transportation system in Greece that serves Greater Athens and East Attica, including a terminal at Athens International Airport. The route was converted from the previous Athens-Piraeus Electric Railways, which had been in operation since 1869, to operate as an electric fast transport system in September 1904. The system is comprised of Line 1, which served as the primary network until the addition of Lines 2 and 3 in 2000. Because Line 1 is entirely underground, it was managed separately from the rest of the city’s transportation network until 2011, when the Greek government established the Athens Mass Transit System to consolidate services.

Construction of the 17.9-kilometer-long Line 2 and the 18.1-kilometer-long Line 3 began in 1992, with the goal of providing an alternate mode of transportation for automobile users in an effort to reduce air pollution.

Since 2005, plans have been in place for a fourth line, which is anticipated to open in 2026. It will add 33 kilometers (kilometers) to the network and include 30 additional stations. Trains on Line 4 would run on their own without the need for a driver to be present.

New York City Subway

Located in Manhattan, the New York City Subway (also known as the A division) began operations in October 1904 with the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) Division and the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation. The A division is now known as the B division (BMT). Initially, a single fare was $0.05, which was a significant savings. It is the world’s biggest transit system in terms of the number of stations, with more than 420 stops spread across 380 kilometers. During the course of a year, the system serves more than 1.72 billion people, ranking it first among the metro systems included in this list and ninth among all metro systems in the globe.

Because the subway operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the lines operate in a variety of service patterns, which might alter while maintenance is being performed.

The signaling system is one of the aspects of the subway that is being modernized.

Communications-based train control (CBTC) signalling has been installed on some lines to improve the efficiency of the system while also allowing many trains to pass through the same block at the same time.

SEPTA

Opening in October 1904, the New York City Subway (also known as the A division) was comprised of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) division, which is now known as the A division, and the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMTC) (BMT). When it was opened, a single fee was only $0.05 per person. There are over 420 stops across 380 kilometers, making it the world’s largest public transportation system in terms of number of terminals. During the course of a year, the system serves more than 1.72 billion people, ranking it first among the metro systems included in this list and ninth worldwide.

A consequence of subway service being available 24/7, the lines run according to a variety of service patterns, which might alter when maintenance is being performed on the system.

The signaling system is one of the aspects of the subway that is being upgraded.

Communications-based train control (CBTC) signalling has been installed on some lines to improve the efficiency of the system while also allowing many trains to pass through a block at the same time.

Related Companies

Opening in October 1904, the New York City Subway (also known as the A division) was comprised of the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) division, which is now known as the A division, and the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) (BMT). Initially, a single fare was only $0.05. It is the world’s largest public transportation system in terms of the number of stations, with more than 420 stops spread across 380 kilometers. During the course of a year, the system serves more than 1.72 billion people, ranking it first among the metro systems included in this list and ninth among all transit systems in the globe.

Because the subway operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the lines operate in a variety of service patterns that might alter while maintenance is being performed.

The signaling system is one of the aspects of the subway system that is being modernized.

Communications-based train control (CBTC) signalling has been installed on some lines to improve the efficiency of the system while also allowing many trains to pass through the same blocks at the same time.

MPL

The New York City Subway system in the United States began operations in October 1904 with the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) division, which is today known as the A division, and the Brooklyn-Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT). When it was opened, a single fare was only $0.05. It is the world’s largest system in terms of the number of stations, with more than 420 stops spread across 380 kilometers. The system transports more than 1.72 billion passengers every year, making it the busiest of the metro systems on this list and the seventh busiest in the world.

Because the subway operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, the lines operate according to a variety of service schedules, which might alter while maintenance is performed.

The signaling system is one of the aspects of the subway that is being updated.

Some lines have implemented communications-based train control (CBTC) signaling, which optimizes line utilization while also allowing trains to operate through the blocks at the same time.

Underground Railroad Safe House Discovered in Philadelphia

A contemporary street view photograph of the row home where conservationists think William Still and his wife Letitia originally lived, as captured by Google Street View. Google Maps in the public domain View from the street On their way northward, hundreds of freedom seekers sought refuge with William Still, a black abolitionist in the years preceding up to the Civil War, who provided them with food and shelter. Still’s narrow house in Philadelphia served as an important stop on the Underground Railroad, and as Meagan Flynn reports for the Washington Post, a team of preservationists believes they have finally identified the house where Still and his wife Letitia once lived.

  1. The Philadelphia Historical Commission decided earlier this month to place a row home on South Delhi Street (originally Ronaldson Street) on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places, which assures that the building cannot be demolished or drastically changed in the future.
  2. A large number of nineteenth-century maps and city documents were searched through by preservationists in their pursuit of this important historic property.
  3. Then one of the historians, Jim Duffin, stumbled upon an advertising in a newspaper from 1851 for a dressmaking company “done in the nicest manner by Letitia Still,” which revealed Letitia’s address.
  4. During the 1840s, Still relocated from New Jersey to Philadelphia where he began working for the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society.
  5. Despite this, he remained engaged in the Committee at a perilous period for abolitionists, when the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act had introduced heavy sanctions for anybody found supporting freedom seekers.
  6. Jane Johnson and her two boys were among those who sought safety, and their dramatic narrative of escape was aired across the country.
  7. As they were prepared to board a boat to go from Philadelphia, Still and another abolitionist, Passermore Williamson, hurried over to Johnson and assured her that she would be able to become a free woman if she joined them on their journey.
  8. Williamson and Still were apprehended as a result of their courageous deeds, and the story of their exploits served to galvanize support for the abolitionist movement.

According to historianEric Foner, who wrote a letter of support for the campaign to save Still’s house, in the midst of a nationwide movement to demolish controversial Confederate monuments, it is critical to remember the importance of elevating sites that are significant to African American history.

about what aspects of our past we chose to honor and why,” says the author. History of African Americans Heritage of Cultural Values SlaveryRecommended VideosDiscoveriesSlavery

The Underground Railroad

Conservators think William Still and his wife Letitia formerly resided in the row home shown in a recent street view photograph by Google. Google Maps in the public domain. a view from the road In the years preceding up to the Civil War, the black abolitionistWilliam Stillprovided sanctuary to hundreds of freedom seekers as they made their way up the Mississippi River toward the north. Even though Still and his wife Letitia lived in a small house in Philadelphia, it was an important stop on the Underground Railroad, according to Meagan Flynn of the Washington Post, who reports that a team of preservationists believes they have finally identified the house where they once resided.

  • The Philadelphia Historical Commission agreed earlier this month to place a row home on South Delhi Street (originally Ronaldson Street) on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places, which assures that the property cannot be destroyed or severely changed in any way.
  • Preservationists combed through a slew of 19th-century maps and city documents in their pursuit of this important historical site.
  • A few years later, one of the historians, Jim Duffin, discovered an 1851 advertising in a newspaper for a dressmaking company “done in the nicest manner by Letitia Still”—which provided her address.
  • “This is one of the incredibly rare opportunities where we absolutely know that this site had a connection to the Underground Railroad because of its connection to Still,” the document states.
  • During the 1840s, Still relocated from New Jersey to Philadelphia, where he started working for the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society.
  • Despite this, he remained engaged in the Committee at a perilous period for abolitionists, when the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act had introduced heavy sanctions for anybody found supporting freedom fighters.
  • Jane Johnson and her two boys were among those who sought safety, and their remarkable narrative of survival was aired across the country.
  • As they were prepared to board a boat to depart from Philadelphia, Still and another abolitionist, Passermore Williamson, hurried over to Johnson and assured her that she would be able to become a free woman if she joined them on their voyage.
  • Later, Williamson and Still were apprehended, and word of their heroism spread across the abolitionist community, strengthening its resolve.
  • It is one of the rare personal descriptions by African American abolitionists of the Underground Railroad.
See also:  How Many Slaves Escaped By The Underground Railroad Chart? (Solution)

As reported by Jake Blumgart of Plan Philly, Foner stated, “I prefer to include new historic places to make the portrayal of history more correctly reflect our varied past and present, as well as to remember those who fought against slavery as well as those who went to battle to preserve it.” Consequently, recognizing the Still residence as a historic site would constitute a statement.

about what aspects of our past we chose to honor and why,” the author writes. Historiography of African Americans Heritage of the Peoples of the World Video Recommendations DiscoveriesSlavery

Home of Levi Coffin

A current street view photograph of the row home where conservationists think William Still and his wife Letitia formerly lived, as shown on Google Maps. Map in the public domain/Google Maps View from the Street In the years leading up to the Civil War, the black abolitionistWilliam Stillprovided sanctuary to hundreds of freedom seekers as they made their way northward. Still’s narrow house in Philadelphia served as an important stop on the Underground Railroad, and as Meagan Flynn reports for the Washington Post, a team of preservationists believes they have finally identified the house where Still and his wife Letitia once lived.

An historic row home on South Delhi Street (originally Ronaldson Street) in Philadelphia was added to the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places earlier this month, ensuring that it will not be destroyed or drastically changed in the future.

Preservationists combed through a slew of nineteenth-century maps and city records in their pursuit of this key historic monument.

Then one of the historians, Jim Duffin, came upon an 1851 newspaper advertisement for a dressmaking company “done in the nicest manner by Letitia Still,” which listed her address.

“The most difficult difficulty in attempting to resurrect the tale of the Underground Railroad is locating evidence that the places ever existed.” Still was described as “second only to Harriet Tubman in Underground Railroad operations” in a document nominating the house for inclusion in the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places.

  • During the 1840s, Still relocated from New Jersey to Philadelphia, where he began working for the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society.
  • Despite this, he remained active in the Committee during a dangerous period for abolitionists, when the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act had instituted harsh punishments for anyone found assisting freedom seekers.
  • Jane Johnson and her two boys were among those who sought safety, and their dramatic narrative of escape was televised throughout the country.
  • As they were prepared to board a boat to go from Philadelphia, Still and another abolitionist, Passermore Williamson, ran over to Johnson and assured her that she could become a free woman if she came with them.
  • Williamson and Still were apprehended as a result of their bravery, and the word of their exploits served to galvanize support for the abolitionist movement.

According to historianEric Foner, who wrote a letter of support for the campaign to save Still’s house, in the midst of a nationwide movement to demolish controversial Confederate monuments, it is critical to remember the significance of elevating sites that are significant to African American history.

about what in our past we chose to honor and why.” History of the African-American People Cultural Patrimony SlaveryRecommended VideosDiscoveries

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The National Geographic Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the exploration of the world’s natural wonders.

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Gina Borgia is a member of the National Geographic Society. Jeanna Sullivan is a member of the National Geographic Society.

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According to National Geographic Society’s Sarah Appleton, Margot Willis is a National Geographic Society photographer.

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  • According to National Geographic Society researcher Sarah Appleton, Margot Willis is a National Geographic Society researcher.

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The History of the T

Boston may be known as the site of the American Revolution, but did you know that it is also known as the home of public transportation in the United States? Yes, this is correct! Despite the passage of time, the first subway tunnels constructed in America are still in operation today beneath the Boston Common, and people continue to go into the city via boats, just as they did in 1631. Our trains and boats are quite different now, yet they have played a vital role in the development of our city for more than three centuries.

1600s

The first inhabitants arrived in Boston Harbor. The image is courtesy of the Boston Public Library. (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0) The city of Boston was a peninsula linked to the town of Roxbury by a tiny strip of land in the 1600s. Farmers and inhabitants of Chelsea had to trek through the towns of Malden, Cambridge, Brighton, and Roxbury in order to get to the city. It took two days to complete the trek. It had become such a hardship that the Massachusetts Court of Assistance issued a contract to anybody who would be willing to manage a ferry service between the Shawmut Peninsula (today known as the North End of Boston) and the Charlestown neighborhood.

In spite of the fact that Boston itself is now connected to nearby cities by a number of bridges and tunnels, many people continue to use the ferry service that runs between Boston and Charlestown, the Airport, Hull and Hingham.

1700s

People could explore the peninsula on foot during Colonial times since it was just 800 acres wide and hence affordable for only a small number of people to purchase a horse and carriage.

However, following the Revolution, the city’s population increased at a rapid pace, and other forms of transportation became increasingly significant. In 1793, the first stagecoach service between Boston and Cambridge was established.

1800s

In Cambridge, there is an omnibus service. The image is courtesy of the Boston Public Library. (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0) By the early 1800s, a bigger, remodelled stagecoach, known as The Omnibus, had gained widespread acceptance. It made many stops on predefined routes, which made it a dependable mode of transportation. However, due of the uneven roads in Boston, it wasn’t a particularly comfortable trip. Beginning in 1856, the first horsecar on rails in Boston ran between Central Square in Cambridge and Bowdoin Square in Boston, avoiding the ruts of the city’s streets and allowing it to transport more people.

1880s

Trolley at the intersection of Tremont and Park Streets, late 1800s. The image is courtesy of the Boston Public Library. (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0) By 1887, there were more than 20 horsecar firms (and 8,000 horses!) providing service in and around Boston. Increasing prices and intense rivalry for customers led the General Court of Massachusetts to enact an act that merged all horsecar firms into the West End Street Railway, which is still operating today.

  • Horsecar travel, on the other hand, had its own set of dangers, particularly when the horses fell ill or were wounded.
  • and Los Angeles, the West End Street Railway began looking into alternate modes of transportation in the late nineteenth century.
  • When everything else failed, the business paid a last minute visit to the Union Passenger Railway Company in Richmond, Virginia, where they saw their railcars, which were powered by electrified copper wires that ran above the trains rather than beneath them.
  • This route is still used today by the Green Line C Branchbus service.

1890s

Residents of Tremont Street in the late nineteenth century joked that they could get to their destinations faster if they walked along the roofs of their delayed streetcars, which was true at the time. When the Governor of Massachusetts and the Mayor of Boston recognized the need for upgrades to the system, they established the Rapid Transit Commission in July 1891 to explore them. The construction of the Park Street subway station. The image is courtesy of the Boston Public Library. (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0) The group advocated four elevated railway lines and a tunnel for streetcars under Tremont Street as alternatives to the current system.

However, even though BERy was eventually absorbed by the MTA and ultimately the MBTA, it left a significant influence on Boston’s infrastructure in two significant areas.

In 1913, Bostonians referred to them as “two rooms and a bath.” We now refer to these vehicles by the name of articulated cars, and they are utilized for rail and bus service across the world, including here in Boston on the Green and Silver lines.

First and foremost, the Tremont Street subway tunnel, which opened in 1897 as North America’s first subway tube, is a historical landmark. It is still in service today, serving as a link between the Government Center, Park Street, and Boylstonstations, among others.

1900s

The Nubian Station of the Boston Elevated Railway. The image is courtesy of the Boston Public Library. (Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.0) In 1918, BERy was experiencing financial difficulties, which prompted the General Court of Massachusetts to establish the Public Control Act. In addition, the legislation established a public Board of Trustees responsible for setting rates to pay the costs of public transportation, authorized the board to raise taxes in the 14 municipalities serviced by BERy, and provided compensation to BERy stockholders in the form of dividend profits.

The MTA subsequently acquired all of the remaining shares and ceased paying dividends to shareholders.

The Massachusetts Turnpike Authority (MTA) authorized the development of fast transit over the Newton Highlands Branch of the Boston and Albany Railroad in 1957.

1960s

During the 1950s and 1960s, the growth of Boston’s commercial areas coincided with the rise in popularity of automobiles, which resulted in traffic congestion on Boston’s streets and roads. Following the earthquake’s aftermath, urban planners increased the city’s roadway infrastructure as well as its parking facilities. As more commuters began using the train into the city, the MTA’s debt climbed as a result of the increasing demand for its services. Despite the fact that the railway system was subsidized by an annual subsidy, suburban residents were concerned that any system extension intended to relieve congestion would raise debt while doing nothing to enhance commute quality.

The end consequence was the consolidation of the numerous railways in the greater Boston area into a single comprehensive public transportation system: the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA).

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) was established as a state body in the same way as the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) was.

MBTA’s first modernization projects were Copley, Maverick, Prudential, Columbia (now JFK/UMass), Orient Heights, Fields Corner, Government Center, Kenmore, Haymarket, and Arlington stations, which were funded by the federal government’s newly formed Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA), now known as the Federal Transit Administration (FTA).

Since 1965, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has provided funding for $3.5 billion in improvements to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA).

1970s

Until the late 1900s, many inhabitants of eastern Massachusetts saw public transportation as a supplemental means of mobility. However, this perception has changed. However, in the 1970s, a lack of gasoline, worries about air pollution, and urban congestion made the T more popular than ever, with more than 300,000 daily users on the system.

1980s

A one-day stoppage occurred in December 1980 as a result of increasing demand and budget constraints. Because of this, the legislature authorized the enlargement of the MBTA board from five to seven members, which includes the Secretary of Transportation, in order to avoid repeat shutdowns. The board of directors oversaw the completion of a $743 million dollar building project that began seven years after the organization’s growth. A segment of the Orange Line’s elevated section — previously known as Washington Street Elevated — was dismantled as part of the Southwest Corridor Project, which also relocated the impacted stops.

After almost a century, however, inhabitants began to see the elevated Orange Line, which extended from present-day Chinatown to Forest Hills, as a loud eyesore that was a nuisance to their daily lives.

1990s

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed by the federal government in 1990, and it mandated that public transportation be accessible to people with disabilities. There have been several enhancements to the system as a consequence, including multiple station renovations and the addition of additional accessible cars, as well as an enlarged paratransit system. On the Green Line, Copley Station is a stop that opened in 2015. After the enactment of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), considerable progress was made, but by the 2000s, passengers with disabilities were still unable to safely and consistently use vital MBTA services.

The Daniels-Finegold et al.

In response to this settlement, significant modifications were made to practically every part of the service, resulting in increased accessibility and usefulness for all riders.

Governor Deval Patrick approved legislation in 2009 that placed the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) under the supervision of the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT).

The FCMB was established to examine the operations of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA).

An oversight board comprised of seven members was constituted by the Massachusetts legislature a month later.

With a goal of using 100 percent renewable power by 2021, the T will be the largest public transportation system in the United States of America.

Today, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is one of the nation’s largest public transportation networks, serving almost 200 cities and towns and more than 1 million daily users on the subway, buses, ferries, and commuter train.

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