“what Effect Did The Underground Railroad Have”? (Question)

The work of the Underground Railroad resulted in freedom for many men, women, and children. It also helped undermine the institution of slavery, which was finally ended in the United States during the Civil War.

Who was affected by the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was the network used by enslaved black Americans to obtain their freedom in the 30 years before the Civil War (1860-1865).

How effective was the Underground Railroad?

Ironically the Fugitive Slave Act increased Northern opposition to slavery and helped hasten the Civil War. The Underground Railroad gave freedom to thousands of enslaved women and men and hope to tens of thousands more. In both cases the success of the Underground Railroad hastened the destruction of slavery.

Why was the Underground Railroad significant?

The underground railroad, where it existed, offered local service to runaway slaves, assisting them from one point to another. The primary importance of the underground railroad was that it gave ample evidence of African American capabilities and gave expression to African American philosophy.

How did the railroad affect slaves?

Railroads bought and sold slaves with contracts and elaborate, printed bills of sale. They recorded these events in balance sheets and company account books. Railroads also developed forms for contracts to hire enslaved labor from slaveholders.

How did the Underground Railroad affect the Civil War?

The Underground Railroad physically resisted the repressive laws that held slaves in bondage. By provoking fear and anger in the South, and prompting the enactment of harsh legislation that eroded the rights of white Americans, the Underground Railroad was a direct contributing cause of the Civil War.

Who ended slavery?

In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation declaring “all persons held as slaves… shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free,” effective January 1, 1863. It was not until the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, in 1865, that slavery was formally abolished ( here ).

What was the short term impact of the Underground Railroad?

The work of the Underground Railroad resulted in freedom for many men, women, and children. It also helped undermine the institution of slavery, which was finally ended in the United States during the Civil War. Many slaveholders were so angry at the success of the Underground Railroad that they grew to hate the North.

What happened after the Underground Railroad?

After the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act as part of the Compromise of 1850 the Underground Railroad was rerouted to Canada as its final destination. Thousands of slaves settled in newly formed communities in Southern Ontario. Suddenly their job became more difficult and riskier.

What impact did the Underground Railroad have on Canada?

They helped African Americans escape from enslavement in the American South to free Northern states or to Canada. The Underground Railroad was the largest anti-slavery freedom movement in North America. It brought between 30,000 and 40,000 fugitives to British North America (now Canada).

What was the significance of Harriet Beecher Stowe?

Abolitionist author, Harriet Beecher Stowe rose to fame in 1851 with the publication of her best-selling book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which highlighted the evils of slavery, angered the slaveholding South, and inspired pro-slavery copy-cat works in defense of the institution of slavery.

How did the Underground Railroad increased tensions between North and South?

The Fugitive Slave Law of 1793 – federal legislation that allowed slave hunters to capture an escapee in any territory or state with only oral proof that the person was a runaway – increased tensions between North and South, thereby moving the country closer to war.

Did railroads use slaves?

Most of the slave labor on southern railroads was hired or rented from local slaveholders to grade the tracks. Enslaved women and children were also forced to work on the railroads, running wheelbarrows, moving dirt, cooking, picking up stones, and shoveling.

How did the Underground Railroad help enslaved African Americans?

How did the Underground Railroad help enslaved African Americans? It provided a network of escape routes toward the North. In his pamphlet Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World, on what did David Walker base his arguments against slavery? They feared that the abolition of slavery would destroy their economy.

Does the Underground Railroad still exist?

It includes four buildings, two of which were used by Harriet Tubman. Ashtabula County had over thirty known Underground Railroad stations, or safehouses, and many more conductors. Nearly two-thirds of those sites still stand today.

Underground railroad 1 Storyboard by elijahwitt

  • Was the underground railroad a real railroad, or was it a myth? History of the Underground Railroad and the life of Harriet Tubman What is the subterranean railroad, and how does it work? Approximately how many individuals did the subterranean railroad assist
  • It was not a real railroad in the traditional sense. It was used to transport people across large distances. It also did not run underground
  • Instead, it passed through homes, farms, churches, and commercial buildings of all kinds. The people who labored for the Underground Railroad were driven by a desire for justice and a desire to see slavery put an end to its practice. Their desire to aid enslaved individuals in escaping was so intense that they were willing to risk their lives and sacrifice their freedom to do it. How did they manage to keep the subterranean railroad undetected for such a long period of time
  • The Underground Railroad was a network of routes, locations, and individuals that assisted enslaved persons in the South who were attempting to flee to the North during the American Civil War. What role did the Underground Railroad play in the American Civil War? Over the course of a century, the Underground Railroad assisted over 100,000 enslaved individuals in their journey to freedom. Are there any opportunities for me to find a job here because of the underground railroad’s influence? in order to assist myself and my brother
  • As the network expanded, the railroad metaphor became more prevalent. Running enslaved individuals from one location to another along the routes was the responsibility of “conductors.” Those who concealed the enslaved persons were referred to as “station masters,” and the areas where the runaways stored their belongings were referred to as “stations.” Fugitives who traveled along the routes were referred to as “passengers,” while those who arrived at the safe homes were referred to as “freight.” In addition to inciting dread and resentment in the South, the Underground Railroad also prompted the passage of punitive legislation that reduced the rights of white Americans, ultimately contributing to the outbreak of the American Civil War. Additionally, it provided many African Americans with their first exposure to political participation and organizational administration
  • The labor of the Underground Railroad resulted in the freeing of many men, women, and children. It also contributed to the subversion of the institution of slavery, which was eventually abolished in the United States during the American Civil War (1860-1865). In response to the success of the Underground Railroad, many slaveholders became enraged and turned against the United States of America.
See also:  Who Is Cora's Mom In The Underground Railroad? (Solution)
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Unit Author
First and Last Name Joycelyn Love
School District Montgomery Public School
School Name McKee Middle School
School City, State Montgomery, Alabama
Unit Overview
Unit Title
A History of the Underground Railroad: Interview With An Abolitionist (from the House of Dies Drear)
Unit Summary
After reading The House of Dies Drear by Virginia Hamilton. This unit will be technology rich. Students will use the internet to research an abolitionist. Students will find basic information about their person, what they did to help the abolitionist movement, what their motivation to help was, and other information. After doing research, students will write a mock interview with the person that they have researched. Students will creatively stage the interview. Costumes could be used. They could set it up like a television talk show or news show with their historical figure as the guest. Interviews will be recorded with a video camera and shown to the entire class.
Subject Area
Literature
Grade Level
9th
Approximate Time Needed
2-3 weeks
Unit Foundation
Targeted Content Standards and Benchmarks
-Research a historical figure -Generate a script that highlights a historical figure’s life -ALEX Standard:1.Identify genre, tone, and plot in short stories, drama, and poetry and identify organizational structure in essays and other nonfiction text to comprehend recreational reading materials 2. Compare the use of language and literary elements and devices, including rhythm, rhyme scheme, tone, and plot, in various selections, cultures, and genres
Student Objectives/Learning Outcomes
-In small groups students will research a famous abolitionist. Students will generate a mock interview with the person and act it out 21 stCentury Skills (2) 1.Accessing information efficiently and effectively, evaluating information critically and competently and using information accurately and creatively for the issue or problem at hand 2.Using technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate and communicate information, and the possession of a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use of information
Curriculum-Framing Questions
Essential Question What struggles did African Americans have during this time? What effect did the Underground Railroad have on ending slavery?
Unit Questions How did the Underground Railroad work? What happened if slaves got caught?
Content Questions Who were some powerful figures in the abolitionist movement? What role did the Quakers play?
Assessment Plan
Assessment Timeline
Before project work begins Students work on projects and complete tasks After project work is completed
·1 week for collaborative research ·1 week for taking information and collaboratively generating script and interview ·2-3 presenting interview ·2-3 days teacher follow up and conference
Assessment Summary
Teacher generated rubric Student self evaluation form
Unit Details
Prerequisite Skills
Knowledge of abolitionists and the Underground Railroad
Instructional Procedures
Students will find basic information about their person, what they did to help the abolitionist movement, what their motivation to help was, and other information. After doing research, students will write a mock interview with the person that they have researched. Students will creatively stage the interview. Costumes could be used. They could set it up like a television talk show or news show with their historical figure as the guest. Interviews will be recorded with a video camera and shown to the entire class.
Accommodations for Differentiated Instruction
Special Needs Students -Pair Work-Students will be paired with students who are patient, compassionate, and willing to do physical work -Group Work -Modifications for Writing -Activities for all types of learners
Nonnative Speakers -Groupwork -Modifications for writing and speaking (drawing, computers)
Gifted/Talented Students -In addition, gifted students could create a newspaper showing what they have learned
Materials and Resources Required For Unit

Technology – Hardware(Click boxes of all equipment needed)

Using the Kansas Nebraska Map on page 53, label all of the states and territories that you can find. All free STATES (excluding California) should be colored one color (do not color in territories). All slave STATES should be colored another color (do no color the territories) Draw a broad line around the free states to indicate their boundaries. Draw another broad line around the slave states to indicate their location. Draw a third thick line around all of the western states to represent the Pacific Ocean.

  1. What was it about slavery that was so essential to the Southerners?
  2. Sectional Dissimilarities The concept of sectionalism refers to a person’s commitment to a specific region or sector of the country.
  3. What caused sectionalism to develop?
  4. 6 I.
  5. Early Sectionalism emerges throughout the colonial period.
  6. The northern hemisphere was a commercial zone that progressively emancipated its slaves.
  7. The economy of the South was built on agriculture, with cotton being grown by slaves.

As a result, diverse political allegiances emerged.

Sectional Dissimilarities Economy of the North and South In the realms of commerce and industry System of plantations Slaves Slaves were gradually emancipated.

Political Party is a group of people who believe in something.

The Expansion of Slavery As of the 1820s, there were more African Americans in the South than there were white people.

The Expansion of Slavery 1.

In the aftermath of the Stono Rebellion, slave codes were toughened in order to protect whites.

It was made unlawful for slaves to congregate, read, or write in public.

Slave uprisings such as the Danish Revolt The Vesey Plot in Charleston, South Carolina, and Nat Turner’s Rebellion in Virginia, North Carolina, make slave owners uneasy.

Vesey plots to take over the city, murder all the white people, and burn it down.

Responding to the Revolts: Vesey’s church is destroyed; Seaman Act: any free black arriving in Charleston on a ship would be lodged in the local jail; Any African Americans who cannot prove they are free are considered slaves; Slaves were not allowed to testify in court; No more than 5 slaves could assemble at a time.

  1. He then went on to murder other white people, increasing the number of victims.
  2. Over 200 slaves were slain by frantic mobs during the Nat Turner Rebellion.s/ Nat Turner Rebellion nat-turners-rebellion (nat-turners-rebellion) 14II.
  3. The United States is growing westward.
  4. 15II.
  5. 16Bellwork 1.
  6. 2.
  7. 17Bellwork Despite the fact that slaves did not revolt on a regular basis, they did so in three ways: by slowing down labor, damaging tools, and claiming to be sick.

(You are free to devise your own, more likely, method.) You have recently been taken to the Plantation as a slave to work on the plantation.

You have been selected to serve as a tester for the master’s culinary creations.

It’s really hot outside, and you’re tired of being at your desk all day.

You are a blacksmith, and you are responsible for creating equipment for other slaves to utilize in the fields.

Someone has a drum in their possession.

Abolitionists (also known as abolitionists) Abolitionists are those who advocate for the abolition of slavery.

The northern hemisphere is the most powerful.

B.

1.

(2) Southern postmasters threw out anti-slavery periodicals because they were deemed unfit for distribution.

C.

In SC, the Underground Railroad was not operational because we were too far away from the northern hemisphere for slaves to make the journey.

What arguments did Southerners use to defend slavery against abolitionists?

21IV.

As time went on, the North became increasingly reliant on industry and manufacturers.

A large number of European immigrants migrated to the United States to work in the industries.

Northern states had bigger populations than Southern ones, and as a result, they had more votes in the House of Representatives than Southern states.

The Economy of the Northern Hemisphere 2.

Why?

23IV.

Instead, Northerners became members of the Whig Party, while Southerners became members of the Democratic Party.

24 Questions to Ponder 1.

2.

3.

4.

What about the South?

Who or what was the source of labor in the North?

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

25 Assignment To begin, pull out the worksheet that says, “George Fitzhugh pushes for slavery.” Take a look at it.

Make a list of reasons why slavery is immoral, based on the readings “To the Public” and “The Meaning of the Fourth of July.” Careless and wasteful are synonyms for being unprovident.

They are unable to put away what they require due to an emergency. Being prudent with your possessions is a sign of good fortune. Deprecate is to denounce or dislike something. Despotism is the same as being a tyrant. Extreme euphoria equates to ennui. benevolently = in a good way 26Examples

What is a retail outlet owned and operated by consumers?

on the Kansas Nebraska Map on page 53, label all of the states and territories that you see. All free STATES (excluding California) should be colored one color (do not color in territories). All slave STATES (except California) should be colored another color, as well (do no color the territories) To delimit the free states, draw a strong line around each one. Draw another broad line around the slave states to indicate their position. Draw a third thick line around all of the western states to represent the United States.

  • The importance of slavery in the South may be explained in a number of ways.
  • Differences in Sections The concept of sectionalism refers to a person’s commitment to a specific region or sector of the country.
  • What caused sectionalism to emerge?
  • 6 I.
  • First and foremost, the North was a commercial zone that emancipated its slaves gradually.
  • The economy of the South was built on agriculture, with cotton being produced by slaves.
  • 7 I.

slaves Slavery’s Expansion (89II) A.

Slavery’s Spread (Part II) In response, there was apprehension about slave uprisings.

After the Stono Rebellion, slave codes were toughened in order to protect white people.

3.

The Vesey Plot in Charleston, South Carolina, and Nat Turner’s Rebellion in Virginia, North Carolina, cause slave owners to be concerned.

Vesey plots to take over the city, murder all the white people, and burn it down.

Vesey’s church is burned to the ground Seaman Act: any free black arriving in Charleston by ship would be lodged in the local jail Any African Americans who cannot provide proof of their freedom are considered slaves Slaves were not allowed to testify in court No more than 5 slaves could congregate at a time 13 In 1831, he and four other slaves murdered his master’s family.

He was captured, executed, and skinned.

Development of Slavery in the United States, Part II C.

The question of whether slavery should be permitted in the new areas is often debated in the media.

Slavery’s Spread and Expansion.

16Bellwork 1.

2.

What is one of them?

In each of these scenarios, how would you protest?

) You have lately been taken to the Plantation as a slave to work on the plantations.

As a result of your selection, you will be serving as a taster for the master’s cuisine.

It’s really hot outside, and you’re tired of being at your computer all day.

In the blacksmith shop, you are constructing tools that will be used by other slaves in the fields.

Apparently, there is a drum in the vicinity.

Abolitionists are those who advocate for the abolition of slavery in all forms.

The northern hemisphere is the most powerful region.

Abolitionists were a minority of Northerners, though.

The Liberator).

He persuaded others to join the abolitionist movement.

(2) Southern postmasters threw out anti-slavery publications because they were deemed obscene.

D.

Abolitionists (number 20III).

Slavery was considered a “positive good” since slave owners provided for their employees.

As time went on, the North became increasingly reliant on industry and manufacturing.

In the House of Representatives, northern states had a bigger population than southern ones, and as a result, they had more votes.

South Carolina and other southern states struggled to maintain a fair distribution of slave and nonslave states in the United States Senate.

Because each state had two votes, the North would not be able to entirely dominate Congress as a result of this.

Abolition of the Democratic-Republican Party and the formation of the Federalist Party occurred in the late 1820s, respectively.

In fact, white Southerners continued to support Democrats until the 1960s.

2.

How did sectionalism come to be?

4.

Which region is it, exactly?

5.

Which region is it, exactly?

6.

7.

List the names of the three slave revolts that we have examined so far.

8.

9.

What factors contribute to disagreements on westward expansion?

What tactics were used by Southerners in an attempt to derail the abolitionists’ progress?

Thirteenth, which political party did residents in the North and the South identify as belonging to?

List all of the reasons why slavery is a positive development.

Not willing to set things aside because of a pressing need to do so Making good use of your resources = Providence. Don’t like it, deprecate it, etc. Like a tyrant, despotism is defined as Extreme euphoria + ennui = a perfect storm. benevolently – in a pleasant manner. 26Examples

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