What Genre Is If You Traveled On The Underground Railroad? (Question)

Genre Non-Fiction If you traveled on the Underground Railroad: Where was the safest place to go?

What is the underground railroad called?

The Railroad was often known as the “freedom train” or “Gospel train”, which headed towards “Heaven” or “the Promised Land”, i.e., Canada. William Still, sometimes called “The Father of the Underground Railroad”, helped hundreds of slaves escape (as many as 60 a month), sometimes hiding them in his Philadelphia home.

Why was the Underground Railroad illegal?

After the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act as part of the Compromise of 1850 the Underground Railroad was rerouted to Canada as its final destination. The Act made it illegal for a person to help a run away, and citizens were obliged under the law to help slave catchers arrest fugitive slaves.

What is an example of the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. The free individuals who helped runaway slaves travel toward freedom were called conductors, and the fugitive slaves were referred to as cargo.

How many runaway slaves were there?

Approximately 100,000 American slaves escaped to freedom.

Is there a Underground Railroad Season 2?

The Underground Railroad Season 2 won’t come in 2021 Whether the series is renewed or not, we’ve got some bad news when it comes to the release date. The Underground Railroad Season 2 won’t come in 2021. There simply isn’t enough time to get through all the stages of production now.

Is The Underground Railroad on Netflix a true story?

Adapted from Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer-award-winning novel, The Underground Railroad is based on harrowing true events. The ten-parter tells the story of escaped slave, Cora, who grew up on The Randall plantation in Georgia.

Is the underground railway on Netflix?

Unfortunately, The Underground Railroad is not currently on Netflix and most likely, the series will not come to the streaming giant any time soon.

What did slaves do after they escaped?

Most large plantations in the South, however, had slaves who escaped. Slaves’ resistance to captivity took many forms, such as performing careless work, destroying property, or faking illness. Many enslaved persons who were able chose escape, however. Some tried to rejoin family members living on a nearby properties.

How many slaves did Harriet Tubman save?

Fact: According to Tubman’s own words, and extensive documentation on her rescue missions, we know that she rescued about 70 people —family and friends—during approximately 13 trips to Maryland.

Why did Harriet Tubman wear a bandana?

As was the custom on all plantations, when she turned eleven, she started wearing a bright cotton bandana around her head indicating she was no longer a child. She was also no longer known by her “basket name”, Araminta. Now she would be called Harriet, after her mother.

How successful was the Underground Railroad?

Ironically the Fugitive Slave Act increased Northern opposition to slavery and helped hasten the Civil War. The Underground Railroad gave freedom to thousands of enslaved women and men and hope to tens of thousands more. In both cases the success of the Underground Railroad hastened the destruction of slavery.

. . . If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad: Levine, Ellen, Larry Johnson: 9780590451567: Amazon.com: Books

The book, “If you journeyed on the Underground Railroad,” written by Ellen Levine in 1988, raises interesting, complex, and extremely important questions on the controversial subject of slavery and the Underground Railroad. Naturally, with only 64 pages, the book is geared for a younger audience of readers. Despite this, even adults will discover kluge, brief responses to open-ended questions that will cause them to pause and reflect. The illustrations by Larry Johnson, which complement the text in an excellent way, provide a very in-depth look at the lives of Sklaven in the United States prior to the American Civil War.

It is conveyed in a really moving way what these people have been through, and how important the desire for freedom has been for them throughout their lives.

Many people were overcome by their fear and half-heartedness in order to demonstrate that they did not agree with this unmenschly system of the Sklaverei.

Even the consequences of allowing such floods to occur will not be overlooked, and it will be made abundantly clear just how dangerous they were at the time of their occurrence.

The language is quite engrossing, and one feels as if one has been transported to another time, as suggested by the question on the back of the book – to another time.

Five stars for an excellent, little book that is much more than just a children’s book in its own right.

If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad

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We would much appreciate it if you could assist us. Please tell us what you think about If You Traveled on the Underground Railroadby Ellen Levine. We’ll fix it as soon as we can. Please accept our sincere thanks for informing us about the situation. If you have a question regarding If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad, you can ask it here. · 15 reviews based on 150 ratings Begin your review of If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad by clicking here. The 13th of November, 2008 Nola Tillman is a woman who lives in the United States.

  • Nola was recommended to me by: Home Learning When I saw that Ellen Levine’s book, “.If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad,” was recommended for second graders, I decided to pick it up.
  • The format used by Levine is really fascinating.
  • I also like the fact that these questions were provided.
  • The format used by Levine is really fascinating.
  • I particularly like the fact that these questions were presented in a table of contents, which is something that is lacking in many publications at this level.
  • She also gives instances from real-life situations.
  • According to reports, a slave called Tice Davids was on the run from his master.

After hours of searching, the proprietor concluded that “he must have taken a subterranean road!” My favorite part of this explanation was the narrative format it adopted (which was far better than my quick synopsis), which included just enough elements to make it come alive without being so many that you were suspicious that it was dramatized.

I really loved the black and white illustrations that were included in this book – at least the 1988 edition; the current one, from what I’ve seen, looks to be more colorful.

I really appreciated the representations of the numerous types of hiding spots along the Underground Railroad that were depicted in the book.

My second-grade daughter had a great time with it; when asked what she thought was the most intriguing portion, she replied, “everything except the introduction.” Then she proceeded to tell me that introductions are usually always dull, indicating that she harbors a deep-seated anger for them.

  1. It is remarkable how well Levine captures and maintains the interest of her readership, even if that reader happens to be a mature lady who is supposed to be cooking lunch for her children.
  2. Even while it wouldn’t work as a read-aloud book for fidgety toddlers, it might be able to hold the attention of kindergarteners and first graders with its engaging illustrations.
  3. 26th of June, 2018 Ebookwormy1rated It was a big hit with them.
  4. I gained a great deal of knowledge!
  5. It appears that there may be further books available.
  6. You’re going to write a review.
  7. What distinguishes it as outstanding?

As a teacher, I found the “Note to the reader about slavery” that preceded the book to be particularly useful and informative.

I gained a great deal of knowledge!

It appears that there may be further books available.

You’re going to write a review.

What distinguishes it as outstanding?

As a teacher, I found the “Note to the reader about slavery” that preceded the book to be particularly useful and informative.

It is through the use of the map supplied in this part that children may better comprehend the Atlantic slave trade and where the slaves originated from and where they were transported.

– The table of contents is a list of the header questions that appear on each page.

– Question and answer books tend to favor the author (who gets to select the questions and the responses), but the information in this book was presented in a detailed and conversational manner.

The clarity contributed to making learning enjoyable!

Even though these samples don’t have any references (which is a good thing), adding references might have been helpful in encouraging pupils to conduct extra study (unfortunate).

– The tone of the “You wouldn’t want to” series has a negative impact on me (also by Scholastic).

Now we only have to locate more of these titles for our own personal collection!

Slavery in the United States.

Sowell’s Race and Culture: A World View was published in 1995.

It was given a high rating since it was very loved.

This book served as an excellent resource for explaining and gaining insight into what it was like to be a member of the underground railroad at this period.

Not only did this book explore what it is like to be a part of a group, but it also discussed The book If You Traveled On the Underground Railroad, written and drawn by Ellen Levine, was published by Copyright in 1992 and has 64 pages.

We can tell from the stories of hurt and courage that were spoken throughout this time period that individuals who were not white skinned faced a great deal of difficulty during this period.

I really enjoyed the way this book was structured.

It also helps students to have an understanding of the historical context and sentiments of individuals who were touched by the events of the time period in question.

When discussing slavery in a lighthearted manner with the younger grades, I would read particular passages aloud in order to engage them.

Posted on March 27, 2015 by CC It received an excellent rating.

It was via this book that I learned how slaves were sold and how slaves may sell themselves.

One thing that particularly resonated with me was the fact that slaves were able to purchase themselves out of slavery, which meant that they were able to obtain freedom papers, which meant that no one could buy them.

I aspire to be as brave as those who served on the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War.

I learnt why it was named the Underground Railroad and gained some valuable insight into the lives of people who I plan to study more about in the coming months.

This review has been suppressed due to the fact that it includes spoilers for the film.

This is a book that is intended to provide youngsters with an introduction to the conditions of slavery in America at the period of the Underground Railroad movement.

This is a fantastic book for teaching youngsters about slavery and the Underground Railroad in the nineteenth century.

I really enjoyed reading aloud to my daughter:) In If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad, you will learn about slavery, the Civil War, and the Underground Railroad from the perspective of someone who actually did travel on the Underground Railroad.

This was a fantastic read for me!

I like that this book included anecdotes about well-known people and places.

You’ll learn what the Underground Railroad was, why slaves would try to escape, where the safe havens were, and much more.

This book had a plethora of material that I either learnt or was reminded of from my previous study of it in elementary school.

It appears to me that this book is part of a larger series of historical informational books with titles that begin with the phrase “If you.” “How did the Underground Railroad get its name?” and “When was the best time of year to escape?” are just a couple of the questions that are answered throughout this entire book.

  • Rather than having the students read the entire book, the teacher could use it as supplemental material by allowing them to choose the questions that they were most interested in answering.
  • All of the other historical non-fiction volumes in the series would be as beneficial in this regard!
  • Another excellent novel that allows young readers to follow in the footsteps of slaves who were seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad is The Underground Railroad: A Novel.
  • However, these novels might make fantastic reading material for mature readers, but they are not suitable for children!
  • Another excellent novel that allows young readers to follow in the footsteps of slaves who were seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad is The Underground Railroad: A Novel.
  • However, these novels might make fantastic reading material for mature readers, but they are not suitable for children!
  • Overall, I like the book, and I believe it has the potential to pique students’ interest in learning more about the people who traveled this route and how the “Underground Railroad” was abandoned once slavery in the United States was abolished.
See also:  Underground Railroad Church In. Indianapolis Indiana Who Was The Founder? (The answer is found)

This book teaches you what it was like to be a slave seeking to escape to freedom on the underground railroad.

14th of February, 2020 It received a perfect rating from Debbie.

It served as a read-aloud for my fifth-grader and second-grader as part of our RoadTrip USA homeschooling project.

Despite the fact that she likes writing both fiction and nonfiction, Ellen’s works for young readers have primarily been factual books.

Trying new things and meeting new people is something I enjoy doing, even if they lived 200 years ago.” Ellen Levine was born in the city of New York.

Despite the fact that she likes writing both fiction and nonfiction, Ellen’s works for young readers have primarily been factual books.

Trying new things and meeting new people is something I like doing, even if they lived 200 years ago.” Ellen Levine was born in the city of New York.

in Politics, earning the designation Magna cum laude.

Working in film and television, she has also taught adults and immigrant youths in special education and English as a second language programs.

Levine used to work as a staff attorney for a public interest law organization, but she now devotes her time to writing, lecturing, and teaching instead.

She divides her time between New York City and Salem, New York.read more The results of the 13th Annual Goodreads Choice Awards have been announced, with more than 4.75 million votes submitted and tabulated.

The company was established in 2009. Thank you for returning. For the moment, please wait while we sign you in to YourGoodreading Account.

If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad

Ellen Levine is a woman who works in the entertainment industry. This book describes what it was like to be a slave attempting to flee to freedom via the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War. Illustrated. Scholastic is the name of the paper.

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If You Traveled On The Underground Railroad (If You.) (Paperback)

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Description

Suppose you were traveling on the Underground Railroad and needed to find the safest spot to stay.

-Would you consider donning a disguise? -What would you do if you had time on your hands? This book describes what it was like to be a slave attempting to escape to freedom via the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War.

About the Author

What methods did individuals use to get away on the Underground Railroad? What was it like to step off the boat at Ellis Island? What was it like to travel the Oregon Trail in a covered wagon with a group of people? With her nonfiction works for young readers, Ellen Levine has opened the doors to realms of thrilling adventure and discovery. Despite the fact that Ellen Levine likes reading and creating fiction, the majority of her works for young readers have been factual. “Writing nonfiction allows me to see what goes on behind the scenes of a tale.

  • Nonfiction is an excellent approach to introduce young readers to actual people who have displayed incredible fortitude in the face of adversity.
  • And one does not have to be a grown-up to participate “she explains further.
  • ‘Research’ is considered boring by many young people; they believe that it consists of going to an encyclopedia and copying facts, giving it a title, and calling it a report.
  • “Primary and secondary sources are topics that I discuss with young people, albeit I may not use the precise language they use.
  • They have comprehended what I mean when I say, “Ask a third grader,” so I know they have grasped the concept of a primary source of inspiration.” Ellen, for example, was present during an emergency operation on a cow for the show If You Were an Animal Doctor.
  • According to her, “it left me with such a vivid impression of this individual.” “That is also a component of the research process.” Ms.
  • In addition, there are questions such as If You Traveled West in a Covered Wagon, If Your Name Was Changed at Ellis Island, If You Lived at the Time of Martin Luther King, and Secret Missions.
  • Ellen splits her time between New York City and Salem, New York, where she lives with her husband.

Date of first publication: February 1st, 1993 Pages:64 Language:EnglishSeries:If You Could See Me Now Minimum Age: 7 years oldRecommended Reading Level Maximum age:10Minimum grade level:2Maximum grade level:5Minimum grade level:2Minimum grade level:5

If you traveled on the underground railroad

All of the reviews are stored in a database. If you were a passenger on the Underground Railroad, you should know that Larry Johnson created the illustrations for Ellen Levine. Illustrations for a Non-Fiction Picture Book (Series) Children between the ages of 7 and 10 Scholastic Publishing Company, 1993, ISBN 0-590-45156-1 Was the Underground Railroad indeed a railroad that went beneath the surface of the earth? No, it was not the case. It was simply the term given to the system that made it possible for a slave to flee from captivity in the southern states of the United States of America.

  • So, what exactly was this technique that the slaves were employing?
  • Many of the slaves traveled via secret paths that were only available to them.
  • People who assisted the slaves move from one location to another were referred to as “conductors,” while those who helped them hide were referred to as “station masters.” It goes without saying that this was a dangerous line of work.
  • People who assisted slaves in escaping may face fines or imprisonment as a result of their acts.
  • For example, young readers will learn how slaves were transported north, where they were concealed, what they ate, how long their voyage took, and where they hid after they made it out alive in the north.

A Children’s Book Review Journal that is accessible online With a little help from Alice in Wonderland Review of a Children’s Book Books for the child in your life are reviewed online by authors who are both new and well-known in the field of children’s literature Book reviews for children, including chapter books, novels, picture books, and non-fiction by well-known authors of children’s literature are included on this page.

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If You Traveled On The Underground Railroad (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

When you check out, select Expedited Shipping to get your order delivered by Thursday, January 13th. English0833508741

Overview

answers questions about the history of the Underground Railroad, discusses what it was like to be a slave, and details the difficulties that escaped slaves experienced throughout their journeys.

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ISBN-13: 9780833508744
Publisher: Turtleback Books
Publication date: 02/01/1993
Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages: 64
Sales rank: 396,039
Product dimensions: 9.10(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile: 720L (what’s this?)
Age Range: 7 – 10 Years

Customer Reviews

Coming Soon – Pre-Orders are being accepted now.

  • Description
  • About the Author
  • Details
  • ReviewsMedia
  • And Contact Information.

What are your knowledge and understanding about the Underground Railroad? What if you were born and raised in a different era and location? What would you choose to wear? What would you choose to eat? What changes would you notice in your everyday routine? In Scholastic’s If You Lived. series, authors address all of the most significant questions that students have about historical events in the United States. With a question and answer structure, kid-friendly artwork, and interesting material, this series is an excellent resource for both history teachers and history enthusiasts.

  1. What is the significance of the term “railroad”?
  2. Who was in charge of it?
  3. This book is an excellent choice for Civil War units and for educating youngsters about this crucial period of American history.
  4. is an English professor and writer who lives in New York City.
  5. Her education study focuses on African American children’s books and writing responses, as well as other topics.
  6. When she isn’t writing or teaching, she enjoys spending time with her family and friends, playing tennis, and practicing yoga.
  7. She is presently a resident of Chicago, Illinois.
  8. She enjoys working on tales that are focused on characters, whether they are fictitious or historical.
  9. She lives in New York City with her family.
  10. Date of publication: October 4th, 2022 Pages:80 Language:English If you’re interested in the series, the recommended reading level is 6 years old is the bare minimum.
  11. a minimum grade level of one and a maximum grade level of three
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If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad by Ellen Levine

Members Reviews Popularity Average rating Mentions
1,232 8 12,215 (3.85) 4
Describes the underground railroad which helped slaves escape to freedom.

‘Recommendations from LibraryThing’ Will you be pleased with it? Loading. Sign up for LibraryThing to find out if this book is something you’ll enjoy. ▾ Having a conversation (About links) ▾ Reviews by other members This book describes what it was like to be a slave attempting to escape to freedom via the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War. In the event that you were a passenger on the Underground Railroad. What was the most secure location to go? Would you be willing to go undercover?

This book describes what it was like to be a slave attempting to escape to freedom via the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War.

The format is a question and answer session. Information on the subterranean railroad that is based on fact. ▾ Reviews that have been published ▾ Relationships between series and at work

ReferencesReferences to this work on external sites are provided.

Wikipedia in English

None ▾ Descriptions of books The Underground Railroad, which assisted slaves in their attempts to elude capture and escape to freedom, is described. ▾ Descriptions of libraries There were no library descriptions discovered. ▾ description provided by LibraryThing members

If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad

What methods did individuals use to get away on the Underground Railroad? What was it like to step off the boat at Ellis Island? What was it like to travel the Oregon Trail in a covered wagon with a group of people? With her nonfiction works for young readers, Ellen Levine has opened the doors to realms of thrilling adventure and discovery. Despite the fact that Ellen Levine likes reading and creating fiction, the majority of her works for young readers have been factual. “Writing nonfiction allows me to see what goes on behind the scenes of a tale.

  • Nonfiction is an excellent approach to introduce young readers to actual people who have displayed incredible fortitude in the face of adversity.
  • “And one does not have to be a grown-up to participate,” she explains further.
  • ‘Research’ is considered boring by many young people; they believe that it consists of going to an encyclopedia and copying facts, giving it a title, and calling it a report.
  • In my discussions with young people, I may not use the exact terms, but I talk about main and secondary sources.
  • “However, when they respond, ‘Ask a third grader,’ I know they’ve grasped the concept of a primary source of inspiration.” Ellen, for example, was present during an emergency operation on a cow for the show If You Were an Animal Doctor.
  • According to her, “it left me with such a vivid impression of this individual.” “That is also a component of the research process.” Ms.
  • In addition, there are questions such as If You Traveled West in a Covered Wagon, If Your Name Was Changed at Ellis Island, If You Lived at the Time of Martin Luther King, and Secret Missions.

Ellen splits her time between New York City and Salem, New York, where she lives with her husband.

Eastern Illinois University : Teaching with Primary Sources

However, many of the intriguing and lesser known elements of the Underground Railroad are not included in many textbooks, despite the fact that it is an essential part of our nation’s history. It is intended that this booklet will serve as a window into the past by presenting a number of original documents pertaining to the Underground Railroad. Broadsides, prize posters, newspaper clippings, historical records, sheet music, pictures, and memoirs connected to the Underground Railroad are among the primary sources included in this collection.

  1. The Underground Railroad was a covert structure established to assist fugitive slaves on their journey to freedom in the United States.
  2. As a result, secret codes were developed to aid in the protection of themselves and their purpose.
  3. Runaway slaves were referred to as cargo, and the free persons who assisted them on their journey to freedom were referred to as conductors.
  4. These stations would be identified by a lantern that was lighted and hung outside.

A Dangerous Path to Freedom

Traveling through the Underground Railroad to seek their freedom was a lengthy and risky trek for escaped slaves. Runaway slaves were forced to travel long distances, sometimes on foot, in a short amount of time in order to escape. They accomplished this while surviving on little or no food and with little protection from the slave hunters who were rushing after them in the night. Slave owners were not the only ones who sought for and apprehended fleeing slaves. For the purpose of encouraging people to aid in the capture of these slaves, their owners would post reward posters offering monetary compensation for assisting in the capture of their property.

  • Numerous arrested fugitive slaves were beaten, branded, imprisoned, sold back into slavery, or sometimes killed once they were apprehended.
  • They would have to fend off creatures that wanted to kill and devour them while trekking for lengthy periods of time in the wilderness, as well as cross dangerous terrain and endure extreme temperatures.
  • The Fleeing Slave Law of 1850 permitted and promoted the arrest of fugitive slaves since they were regarded as stolen property rather than mistreated human beings under the law at the time.
  • They would not be able to achieve safety and freedom until they crossed the border into Canada.
  • Aside from that, there were Underground Railroad routes that ran south, on their way to Mexico and the Caribbean.
  • He was kidnapped from his northern abode, arrested, and prosecuted in Boston, Massachusetts, under the provisions of this legislation.
  • After the trial, Burns was returned to the harshness of the southern states, from which he had thought he had fled.

American Memory and America’s Library are two names for the Library of Congress’ American Memory and America’s Library collections.

He did not escape via the Underground Railroad, but rather on a regular railroad.

Since he was a fugitive slave who did not have any “free papers,” he had to borrow a seaman’s protection certificate, which indicated that a seaman was a citizen of the United States, in order to prove that he was free.

Unfortunately, not all fugitive slaves were successful in their quest for freedom.

Harriet Tubman, Henry Bibb, Anthony Burns, Addison White, Josiah Henson, and John Parker were just a few of the people who managed to escape slavery using the Underground Railroad system.

He shipped himself from Richmond, Virginia, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a box that measured three feet long, two and a half feet deep, and two feet in diameter. When he was finally let out of the crate, he burst out singing.

ConductorsAbolitionists

Train conductors on the Underground Railroad were free persons who provided assistance to escaped slaves moving via the Underground Railroad system. Runaway slaves were assisted by conductors, who provided them with safe transportation to and from train stations. They were able to accomplish this under the cover of darkness, with slave hunters on their tails. Many of these stations would be in the comfort of their own homes or places of work, which was convenient. They were in severe danger as a result of their actions in hiding fleeing slaves; nonetheless, they continued because they believed in a cause bigger than themselves, which was the liberation thousands of oppressed human beings.

  • They represented a diverse range of ethnicities, vocations, and socioeconomic backgrounds.
  • Due to the widespread belief that slaves were considered property, the freeing of slaves was perceived as a theft of slave owners’ personal belongings.
  • Captain Jonathan Walker was apprehended off the coast of Florida while attempting to convey slaves from the United States to freedom in the Bahamas.
  • With the following words from one of his songs, abolitionist poet John Whittier paid respect to Walker’s valiant actions: “Take a step forward with your muscular right hand, brave ploughman of the sea!
  • She never lost sight of any of them during the journey.
  • He went on to write a novel.
  • John Parker is yet another former slave who escaped and returned to slave states in order to aid in the emancipation of others.

Rankin’s neighbor and fellow conductor, Reverend John Rankin, was a collaborator in the Underground Railroad project.

The Underground Railroad’s conductors were unquestionably anti-slavery, and they were not alone in their views.

Individuals such as William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur and Lewis Tappan founded the American Anti-Slavery Society, which marked the beginning of the abolitionist movement.

The group published an annual almanac that featured poetry, paintings, essays, and other abolitionist material.

Frederick Douglass was an escaped slave who rose to prominence as an abolitionist after escaping from slavery.

His other abolitionist publications included the Frederick Douglass Paper, which he produced in addition to delivering public addresses on themes that were important to abolitionists.

Anthony was another well-known abolitionist who advocated for the abolition of slavery via her speeches and writings.

For the most part, she based her novel on the adventures of escaped slave Josiah Henson.

Efforts of Abolitionists Telling Their Story:Fugitive Slave Narratives

Henry Bibb was born into slavery in Kentucky in the year 1815, and he was the son of a slave owner. After several failed efforts to emancipate himself from slavery, he maintained the strength and persistence to continue his struggle for freedom despite being captured and imprisoned numerous times. His determination paid off when he was able to successfully escape to the northern states and then on to Canada with the assistance of the Underground Railroad, which had been highly anticipated. The following is an excerpt from his tale, in which he detailed one of his numerous escapes and the difficulties he faced as a result of his efforts.

  • I began making preparations for the potentially lethal experiment of breading the shackles that tied me as a slave as soon as the clock struck twelve.
  • On the twenty-fifth of December, 1837, the long-awaited day had finally arrived when I would put into effect my previous determination, which was to flee for Liberty or accept death as a slave, as I had previously stated.
  • It took every ounce of moral strength I have to keep my emotions under control as I said goodbye to my small family.
  • Despite the fact that every incentive was extended to me in order to flee if I want to be free, and the call of liberty was booming in my own spirit, ‘Be free, oh, man!
  • I was up against a slew of hurdles that had gathered around my mind, attempting to bind my wounded soul, which was still imprisoned in the dark prison of mental degeneration.
  • Furthermore, the danger of being killed or arrested and deported to the far South, where I would be forced to spend the rest of my days in hopeless bondage on a cotton or sugar plantation, all conspired to discourage me.
  • The moment has come for me to follow through on my commitment.
  • This marked the beginning of the construction of what was known as the underground rail route to Canada.
See also:  Why Did The Underground Railroad Not Stop In The United States? (Correct answer)

For nearly forty-eight hours, I pushed myself to complete my journey without food or rest, battling against external difficulties that no one who has never experienced them can comprehend: “not knowing when I might be captured while traveling among strangers, through cold and fear, braving the north winds while wearing only a thin layer of clothing, pelted by snow storms through the dark hours of the night, and not a single house in which I could enter to protect me from the storm.” This is merely one of several accounts penned by runaway slaves who were on the run from their masters.

Sojourner Truth was another former slave who became well-known for her work to bring slavery to an end.

Green and many others, including Josiah Henson, authored autobiographies in which they described their own personal experiences.

Perhaps a large number of escaped slaves opted to write down their experiences in order to assist people better comprehend their struggles and tribulations; or perhaps they did so in order to help folks learn from the mistakes of the past in order to create a better future for themselves.

16 Children’s Books About the Underground Railroad

“There are no trains in this narrative!” says the narrator. I brought home a stack of books about the Underground Railroad and this was my youngest son’s reaction when he saw them. The fact that this railroad had no trains or tracks, however, was swiftly discovered by my lads, who rapidly realized that it may have been the most significant and powerful railroad our nation had ever seen. You might also be interested in these books about the Civil Rights Movement! This collection of novels will assist both younger and older readers in comprehending the harshness of slavery as well as the costly price of freedom for those who attempt to flee from their oppressors.

I hope you may learn something new and be inspired by what you read here.

16 Books About the Underground Railroad

Using the biography of an American hero as inspiration, Adler has written yet another outstanding picture book. This book chronicles Harriet Tubman from her upbringing as a slave in Maryland to her emancipation via the Underground Railroad, and then to her return to the South to aid in the emancipation of other African-Americans. It also depicts her life during and after the Civil War, during which she continued to serve others and fight for justice for the rights of women. My recommendation for readers ages 5 and above is to read any of Adler’s biographies.

Follow the Drinking Gourdby Bernadine Connelly

This novel, which is inspired on the popular American folk song of the same name, tells the story of one family’s escape from slavery through the Underground Railroad system. It demonstrates how individuals fleeing to freedom would rely on natural cues such as stars to navigate their way to the northern reaches of the continent. This book is appropriate for children aged 5 and up. This story is also available on DVD, with Morgan Freeman providing the narration.

Henry’s Freedom Boxby Ellen Levine

Beginning when he was taken away from his family at an early age and continuing into adulthood, when his wife and children are sold to another slave master, Henry has always dreamt of being free. When it comes to becoming free, Henry comes up with an innovative solution: he will mail himself to the North! His arduous voyage in a shipping container is ultimately worth it since he receives a prize. Based on a true story, I recommend that children between the ages of 4 and 8 read this book aloud.

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quiltby Deborah Hopkinson

In the midst of her enslavement and sewn-up existence, a young lady named Clara dreams of achieving freedom, both for herself and for her family. Sometime later, she overhears two other slaves discussing something known as the Underground Railroad, and she understands that she may use her abilities as a seamstress to assist others in their journeys toward freedom.

It is her dream to create a quilt from scraps of cloth, which can also serve as a map to help her find her way to freedom in the North, thanks to the Underground Railroad. Sharing this book with youngsters aged three and up is highly recommended.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroadby Henry Cole

It is just the hauntingly beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period in this frightening picture book; there are no words. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision about her future. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor lurking in the shadows? Do you think she’ll go with the flow and follow her heart and compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroadby Pamela Duncan Edwards

A Barefoot (escaped slave) must go through the woods at night in order to avoid being discovered by the Heavy Boots who are on the lookout for them. The Barefoot must pay heed to the clues that the forest is sending him, and the animals appear to be able to assist him in his quest for direction. Throughout his journey, readers will follow him as he hides in the forest and the swamp, until arriving at his final destination. This engaging picture book offers a really unique point of view, and I recommend it for children aged 5 and older because of its distinct perspective.

Almost to Freedomby Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

Lindy is infatuated with her doll Sally, and the two of them do everything together. Sally always follows Lindy everywhere she goes. Sally even joins Lindy and her family as they boldly flee slavery on the Underground Railroad. Lindy and her family are accompanied by Sally. Sally, on the other hand, gets abandoned along the route. She is depressed until she understands that she may be a source of comfort to another little girl on her journey to independence. With a narrative written from the perspective of Sally the doll, this story is a wonderful choice for reading aloud with children ages 5 and up.

The Birdmanby Troon Harrison

Alexander Ross was best known as an ornithologist, which is a scientific term that refers to someone who studies birds. However, after reading Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Ross discovered a new passion: assisting enslaved people in their quest for freedom. His extensive understanding of nature also assisted him in determining the most effective means of escaping for enslaved persons fleeing to Canada from the United States. Ross believed that if birds were allowed to fly wherever they pleased, then all humans should be given the same opportunity.

Beautifully illustrated, this picture book offers an enthralling glimpse into the life of a little-known hero, and it is appropriate for children aged 5 and above.

Blacksmith’s Songby Elizabeth Van Steenwyk

In his role as a blacksmith, a small child observes his father pounding hot metal into shape, and he realizes that his father is doing much more than simply producing tools. The rhythm that his father pounds out on his anvil may be that of a slave, but the message that it sends out to those seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad is not.

When Pa falls ill, the little son will be called upon to stand up to the anvil and take over the vital task. Suitable for children aged 6 and older, this picture book is a great introduction to the alphabet.

Before She Was Harrietby Lesa Cline-Ransome

Harriet Tubman is a historical figure whose full tale is unknown to those who only know her as such. She was more than just a formerly enslaved person. She was a spy, a suffragette, a general, a nurse, and a lot more things than that. This wonderful picture book goes into the numerous roles she played and the many aliases she went by during her long and illustrious life. I recommend that readers between the ages of 6 and 12 read this unusual biography.

Chapter Books and Early Readers

As Emma pays a visit to the Anacostia Museum for African American History, she finds herself transported back in time and forced to go via the Underground Railroad to freedom. Will she be able to make it out of slavery without being apprehended by the authorities? This early reader is jam-packed with information, and it is ideal for children who are reading at or above the second grade level.

What Was the Underground Railroad?by Yona Zeldis McDonough

This is the second time that theWhoHQseries has published a fantastic non-fiction book about a vital issue. This book contains intriguing data, a plethora of images, maps, and biographies of people who took part in the expedition. An insert with images from the historical period is included so that children may see how slavery affected actual individuals who lived real lives and establish the link between the two. This gripping chapter book is best suited for children ages 8 and older because of its complexity.

Eliza’s Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diaryby Jerdine Nolen

In the aftermath of Eliza’s mother’s sale to a new family, all Eliza has left to recall is her quilt and the stories she used to tell. When Eliza’s mistress becomes ill, she begins to hear rumors about her being sold, and she realizes that her time has come. The words of her mother and the farmhand Joe guide her down the Underground Railroad, and before long, she is being guided by a gentle woman named Harriet into slavery. If your child is reading at or above the fourth grade level, this fictitious journal of a 12-year-old house slave in Virginia is a fantastic choice for them.

Dear Austin: Letters From the Underground Railroadby Elvira Woodruff

Levi has formed a friendship with a young child named Jupiter, who happens to be the son of a former slave. They have a lot of fun together, playing and enjoying the Pennsylvania countryside. When Jupiter’s sister is abducted by a slave trader, Levi and Jupiter come up with a scheme to free her from being sold into slavery. Naive Levi immediately learns how dire the position of the slaves is, and he communicates his observations to his brother, Austin, through letters sent to and from the slaves.

Stealing Freedomby Elisa Carbone

Abolitionist Anna Maria Weems was born into slavery, and that is the only way she has ever known existence. Her family is her one source of happiness in life; being able to spend time with them is what makes life tolerable for her. Although being a slave frequently meant being apart from family, Anna eventually finds herself alone and without the people she cared about. She is consumed by sadness and performs the only move that appears to make sense: she flees the scene.

As a guy, Anna sets out to discover independence as well as her family, which she believes she can’t find otherwise. This novel is based on a true tale, and it is recommended for readers aged 11 and above.

Bradyby Jean Fritz

Even though Brady is well-known for having a loud mouth, he’s never had to keep a secret quite like this before — the secret of an Underground Railroad stop close to his family’s house. Brady is presented with a difficult decision: should he reveal what he knows, or should he assist and protect slaves who are attempting to flee for their lives? This book is best suited for children who are reading at or above the third grade level.

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