What Hours Ate They Open At The Slave Haven Underground Railroad Musem In Memphis? (The answer is found)

How much does the slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum in Memphis cost?

  • Located a little more than a mile north of downtown Memphis, the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum‘s hours vary by season; it is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. from September to May and 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. June to August. Parking is plentiful, and admission costs $12 for adults and $11 for college students, seniors and kids ages 4 to 17.

How long is the Slave Haven tour?

Visitors should budget at least two to three hours to tour the entire facility. The museum is also a featured stop on many of the best Memphis tours.

Is there a tour of the Underground Railroad?

Schedule Your Visit Our adjusted hours of operations are Tuesday through Sunday from 10am to 4pm (EST). Learn more about what you can see and do at the visitor center, and explore the stories of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad!

When was slave haven built?

“There’s just so much to see here,” Turner said. “You get a full history lesson.” The Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum is located in the former home of Jacob Burkle. Built in 1856, this home was used for years as a safe house for runaway slaves on their journey to freedom in Canada.

Who was Jacob Burkle?

According to the museum’s extensive research, Burkle was an abolitionist sympathizer and member of the historic Underground Railroad. In the late 1840s, Burkle fled Germany and conscription into the army to avoid fighting in a series of revolutionary wars he saw as unjust and oppressive.

What day does Underground Railroad come on?

“The Underground Railroad” will premiere on May 14.

Is Harriet Tubman museum open?

The museum is usually open Tuesday through Friday, 12-3pm, and Saturday, 12-4pm. There is no admission fee but donations are welcome.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Tennessee?

The Underground Railroad was the name given clandestine operations by which many slaves before and during the Civil War fled to northern states and a measure of freedom. Some lines of that railroad ran through East Tennessee, even though slavery was much less prevalent here than in many other parts of the South.

Who ran the Burkle Estate?

The Burkle Estate was built in 1849 by Jacob Burkle, livestock trader and bakery owner, who opened his home to help slaves escape to freedom. The house has 19th century furnishings but its main feature is the secret cellar and trap doors that offered refuge to runaway slaves.

How did Jacob Burkle help slaves move along the Underground Railroad?

In an effort to help escaping slaves; Burkle would often risk his life in order to harbor the runaways in his residence, which became known as Burkle Estate. Burkle secretly helped fleeing slaves on their journey to freedom by operating an Underground Railroad way station at his home and stockyard.

What made Harriet Tubman so successful?

Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery in the South to become a leading abolitionist before the American Civil War. She led hundreds of enslaved people to freedom in the North along the route of the Underground Railroad.

Slave Haven / Burkle Estate Museum (Memphis) – 2022 All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

Couples in December 2021 I phoned twice to be sure they would be open today, December 30th, and they confirmed that they would be. Both times I inquired, I was informed that they would be open until 4 p.m. When I arrived at the entrance, the signs stated that the museum will close at 4 p.m. today, with the final tour departing at 3 p.m. I couldn’t believe my eyes when we came from Nashville, which was 3.5 hours away, and saw that they were closed. I’ve been calling and calling, and the message is being passed to someone’s mobile phone, but it’s been fruitless.

I’m aware of what occurred.

I was saddened but not shocked to learn that they do not care about or are serious about African-American history.I was upset but not surprised.

It’s interesting to note that they must have received some form of grant because they now have a parking lot as well as a much more attractive sign.

  • If you can, get in here as soon as possible since their days are numbered if they continue to engage in such careless actions.
  • Contributions from NSouthGretna and LA273 Nov 2021Solo performance This restaurant is one that I love visiting; nevertheless, it was badly managed.
  • Written on November 29, 2021This review represents the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.ogol17This review represents the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • November of the year 2021 Despite the fact that the visit here was really intriguing, the museum is badly maintained and laid out.
  • Only while I was walking around the home did I come across a lady sitting in the back yard who appeared to be shocked that I had come to see her.
  • The so-called “tour” itself is a bizarre and bizarre experience.
  • The only other person present (the aforementioned lady) would periodically come over to advise me where I needed to go next in the audio.

Written on the 14th of November, 2021 This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC.

It’s a fascinating story.

Really nicely done in terms of presentation.

I am grateful for the opportunity to learn so much more about the history of the United States.

The date of writing is November 4, 2021.

The month of October 2021 Family I had been looking forward to seeing you for a long time.

We arrived at 10:20 a.m., and as soon as we stepped out of our car, a lady came out of her car to speak with us as well.

When the second lady contacted, she was told that the store was closed on Mondays.

They need to make changes to their website to reflect the real hours that they are open.

Puerto Rico’s Vicente FSan Juan is a little town with a big heart.

This is an example of potential that was not realized.

It should be a modest museum that focuses on the subject of the subterranean railway in great detail.

It is remarkable how little study has been done on the safe house, its residents, and how it fits into the wider plan of the subterranean train system in this novel.

There isn’t even a simple family genealogy that depicts what occurred to the various family members during and after the Civil War can be found.

Written on October 14, 2021This review represents the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor user and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor Inc.

The staff was extremely educated and patiently addressed all of my inquiries.

TripAdvisor LLC does not necessarily agree with or endorse the content of this review.

September in the next year, 2021 The trip and the information were excellent.

I enjoyed it when the tour began and we were given a live tour guide.

Written on September 5, 2021This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor, LLC.

The two ladies who were present on that particular day were extremely knowledgeable and helpful.

Written on the 24th of August, 2021 This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC.

I am fascinated by the subject of slavery, therefore the quilt show and the significance of the quilts piqued my interest.

However, I can understand your point of view. Written on the 5th of August, 2021 This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and does not reflect the views and opinions of TripAdvisor LLC. Results are being displayed. 1-10of701

Everything You Need to Know About Visiting Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum

URL: The sizes are ” (max-width: 640px) 600px, 976px” and ” (max-height: 640px) 255w, 600w, 976w” alt=”picture”> alt=”picture”> Associated with the Baxter Buck/Memphis Convention The Visitors Bureau is a government agency that promotes tourism. Price Hours are $12 for adults and $11 for children ages 4-17. Details MuseumsType1 to 2 hours in length It is now time to spend The Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum, also known as the Burkle Estate, transports visitors back in time to the period before the American Civil War.

  1. Jacob Burkle, the home’s owner, was an active member of the anti-slavery movement and provided sanctuary to persons fleeing slavery.
  2. The estate also has relics that depict the horrific conditions that slaves endured in the American South.
  3. Several reviewers commented on how educational and entertaining the tour guides were, and how the experience was like a “moving history lecture.” Because tour capacity is limited as a result of COVID-19, it is recommended that you schedule a tour in advance to ensure that you get a space.
  4. to 4 p.m.
  5. to 5 p.m.
  6. The museum’s hours change according on the season.
  7. Children under 4 are admitted free.
  8. For further information, please see the museum’s website.

More Best Things To Do inMemphis

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1 National Civil Rights Museum – Lorraine Motel

According to recent visitors, visiting Memphis’s National Civil Rights Museum should be at the top of any visitor’s list of things to see and do. The museum, which is housed in the Lorraine Motel, where Martin Luther King Jr. was slain on April 4, 1968, offers multimedia displays about the civil rights struggle. Visitors are taken through five centuries of history with the use of 260 objects, more than 40 films, oral histories, interactive media, and external listening stations. Your self-guided tour will include viewing objects that were important to the movement, such as a Greyhound bus that was used by the Freedom Riders.

  • The museum was hailed as “surreal” and “very affecting” by those who visited it.
  • For a comprehensive tour of the complex, visitors should plan on spending at least two to three hours.
  • According to recent visitors, visiting Memphis’s National Civil Rights Museum should be at the top of any visitor’s list of things to see and do.
  • was slain on April 4, 1968, offers multimedia displays about the civil rights struggle.
  • Your self-guided tour will include viewing objects that were important to the movement, such as a Greyhound bus that was used by the Freedom Riders.
  • The museum was hailed as “surreal” and “very affecting” by those who visited it.
  • For a comprehensive tour of the complex, visitors should plan on spending at least two to three hours.

Many of the best Memphis tours include a stop at the museum as part of their itinerary. More information may be found here. Photograph by Barry Winiker for Getty Images See the whole list of the Top Things to Do in Memphis».

Slave Haven Memphis Museum – Burkle Estate [updated January 2021]

The Slave Haven Memphis and the Burkle Estate are two must-see attractions in the Mid-South if you are ever in the area. The Burkle Estate was established in 1849 by Jacob Burkle, a cattle merchant and bakery owner who gave his property to slaves attempting to elude capture and emigrate to freedom in the United States. The house is furnished in the style of the nineteenth century, but its most notable feature is the underground cellar and trap doors that served as a haven for fugitive slaves.

  1. The experience of descending down the cellar and bending your knees on the brick floor of this claustrophobic space will undoubtedly provide you with a greater appreciation for the fate of the slaves.
  2. The Underground Railroad was a network of people, both African American and white, who came together to provide shelter and assistance to fugitive slaves from the southern United States.
  3. Although the exact dates of its inception are unknown, it was active from the late 18th century until the Civil War, after which its attempts to weaken the Confederacy were carried out in a less-secretive manner until the Civil War ended.
  4. The Burkle Estate, a mansion along the Mississippi River that functioned as a station on the Underground Railroad before to the Civil War, assisting slaves on their journey north to freedom.
  5. I’m a little disappointed in myself for not realizing that Memphis was the site of an Underground Railroad station before I arrived.
  6. Since we began watching the television show Underground, which follows a gang of slaves who plot a daring escape from a Georgia farm, my daughter Madison has become fascinated with all things slavery.
  7. It’s true that the Underground Railroad House is a minimalist and minimalistic installation, but it makes up for it by being interactive, as seen by a guided walk inside the house.

Underground RailroadSlave Haven Memphis / Burkle Estate

Slave Africans in the United States used the Underground Railroad to migrate from the southern United States to the northern United States or Canada, ultimately achieving their freedom. The Underground Railroad was neither underground nor a railroad in the traditional sense. It received its name because all of its actions had to be carried out in secret, either via the use of darkness or by assuming other identities. Different routes were referred to as lines, while halting points were referred to as stations, and those who provided assistance along the way were known as conductors.

See also:  What Are The Coordinates Of The Underground Railroad? (TOP 5 Tips)

Fugitive-slave hunters were unable to track down the routes because they passed through 14 Northern states and “the promised land” of Canada, which was beyond their reach.

Members of the free black community (including former slaves like as Harriet Tubman) as well as Northern abolitionists, philanthropists, and church leaders such as Jacob Burkle were among those who most actively supported slaves in their attempts to escape through the “Underground railroad.”

Who was Jacob Burkle

JACOB BURKLE, the Master of the Burkle Estate, is something of a mystery in the history of Memphis. As far as can be determined from the little records that have survived, Jacob was a member of a wave of German immigrants who arrived in America in the mid-19th century to avoid conscription into Bismarck’s military. Burkle was a fairly successful businessman in Memphis, where he owned a stockyard north of downtown Memphis. The home, which was constructed in 1849, looked out over the stockyards and the Mississippi River, which was three blocks distant.

Located on the site of Jacob Burkle’s residence, which he constructed with a cellar and a network of tunnels to conceal fugitive slaves until they could be transported in his railroad wagons, the Memphis Stockyards became known as the Memphis Stockyards.

Since its inception in 1849, Burkle’s Underground Railroad has served people all over the world.

As a result, he kept his actions hidden from his family, most likely for their own safety, because slave catchers had long accused him of hiding fugitive slaves and had broken down his door on more than one occasion in their quest for slaves.

Slavery In Memphis

Memphis has a long and complicated history of dealing with issues of racism, power, and civil rights, among other things. From the time of the American Civil War until the present day, there has been hatred, bloodshed, and systemic persecution of black people in Tennessee. While sheltering slaves in the house’s cellar, crawl space, and presumably attic until the conclusion of the Civil War and full emancipation in 1865, Jacob Burkle is considered to be one of the first white persons in Memphis to stand up to the majority and go against the majority.

On the question of whether the Burkle estate was a stop on the Underground Railroad, there is some disagreement.

Its only remnants are oral memories and the home itself, which contains numerous unusual and distinctive features (such as a trap door and a hidden staircase) that the museum claims serve as proof of the building’s original purpose.

What we do know is that Jacob Burkle assisted hundreds of slaves in their escape to freedom, and that Slave Haven continues to educate thousands of visitors each year, including field excursions for local schoolchildren and foreign tourists.

In addition to important members of Memphis’ slaving industry, such as rich merchant Wade Bolton, in honor of whom Bolton High School is named, the book also features leaders of the resistance effort, such as Harriet Tubman and Burkle.

Abolitionist in the Mid 1800s

Jacob Burkle established his farm in the 1850s, at a period in which the war between oppression and resistance had been raging for decades before. The first Africans were imported to the United States by Dutch slave traders in 1619. A slave ship and plantation insurrection, subversive methods of undermining overseers and quotas, and of course, emancipation through the Underground Railroad are all well-documented examples of black resistance to slavery that is as ancient as slavery itself. As Dowdy points out, “it’s possible that an Underground Railroad cell would be operating in a location like Memphis.” All kinds of people and things passed through Memphis, which was the only site in the region where people could work, trade, stock up on supplies, and cross the Mississippi River.

  • According to Dowdy, the city’s first two majors, Marcus Winchester and Isaac Rawlings, promoted education for people of color and believed that slavery was a necessary but morally abhorrent economic practice in the United States.
  • Tennessee had a constitutional convention in 1834, which resulted in the state’s first constitution.
  • Unfortunately, the conference chose instead to deny freedmen the ability to vote, a privilege that had previously been guaranteed by the state constitution of 1796.
  • In fact, local officials issued a rule requiring all individuals of African origin to get a permit in order to stroll or drive a carriage on public sidewalks or streets.
  • Additionally, there is speculation that the Hunt Phelan mansion served as a station on the Underground Railroad, owing in part to an escape tunnel that runs beneath the property.
  • Burkle returned to a peaceful life of selling cattle, and anti-Black attitudes continued to be a constant presence in the community after that.
  • Memphis was encircled by Black Union forces when white men attacked the city, burning over 100 homes, churches, and businesses and killing almost 50 African Americans in retaliation to employment rivalry from recently freed slaves and the occupation of Memphis by Black Union troops.
  • My daughter Madison, who is 13 years old, and my mother, who is 75 years old, were able to enjoy this incredible event with me, and it was truly unforgettable.
  • I have a great deal of respect for all the people who were part in the Underground Railroad and all they had to undergo.
  • Because slaves were not permitted to read or write without risk of being beaten or even murdered, the slave quilts were used to transmit information about how to escape to freedom.

The next step on our quest was to go into the cellar and view the actual hiding spot for the slaves and their masters. This was a really emotional experience for me!

Conclusion of Slave Haven Memphis

It is critical to convey the experiences of African-Americans and how they overcame the traumas of slavery in order to educate the public. I make certain that my daughter is aware of her heritage and understands how fortunate she is to be able to pursue a formal education, participate in ballet and tap classes, and make friends from a variety of cultural backgrounds. A plethora of priceless historical knowledge is available at Slave Haven Memphis and the Burkle Estate. I would suggest Slave Haven Memphis and the Burkle Estate to people of all ages, including children and adults.

In particular, the educational component regarding the underlying meaning behind different spirituals, as well as the wonderful music presented by Ekpe and Company, made the trip well worth it, especially during Black History Month Memphis in February.

Expect a Slave Haven rather than a bunch of extraneous features.

This book demonstrates the power of secret plans and locations shared among a network of people who worked together to bring down an inhuman institution, and it is only the first chapter in Memphis’ fascinating and unique story of civil rights, collective resistance, and Black political power, which is still unfolding.

Burkle Estate – Wikipedia

The Burkle Estate

Established 1997, built in 1849
Location 826 N Second St,Memphis, TN

The Burkle Estate, located at 826 North Second Street in Memphis, Tennessee, is a historic mansion. The Slavehaven is another name for this location. Even though some historians question this assertion, the Burkle Estate is widely believed to have been a stop on the Underground Railroad, a secret network of way stations that assisted slaves escaping to freedom in the northern states during the American Civil War. Jacob Burkle, a German immigrant who came to the United States in 1849, built the house on this site.

Underground Railroad

Some historians believe that the Burkle Estate may have functioned as a stopover for fugitive slaves traveling on the Underground Railroad through the area. Mr. Burkle worked as a cattle merchant and abaker in the public eye. Some have speculated that he was a conductor on the Underground Railroad in private conversations. Many think that his home was the final destination in a succession of Memphis mansions connected via tunnels that began with his birthplace.

Among the house’s features was a tiny cellar, which may have been used to conceal fleeing slaves. A boat would then transport slaves upriver to other way stations in the free states north of the Ohio River, where they would be freed.

Controversy

A heated argument rages over the role played by the home as a stop on the Underground Railroad. Despite the fact that a representative for the United States Army Corps of Engineers in Memphis claims that the soil, which is composed primarily of loess, would provide an excellent material for tunnels, there is no indication of tunnels beneath the structure. The only way out was through the subterranean network. Rather than its literal meaning as a network of tunnels, the term subterranean resistance would relate to the secrecy with which the operation was carried out rather than its literal meaning as a network of tunnels.

An alternative argument was put up by historians from the Memphis public library system in response to the assertion that there is insufficient evidence to establish that the Burkle Estate was a stop on the Underground Railroad.

The lack of primary, tangible evidence of the Burkle Estate, according to the historians, serves to strengthen the conclusion that the Burkle Estate was a stop on the Underground Railroad.

The presence of a trapdoor and a secret stairway inside the Burkle Estate house, both of which are unusual qualities of a residence, are also used to infer that the Burkle Estate had a role in the Underground Railroad, according to the story.

Slavehaven Museum

The home was converted into a museum in 1997, and visitors can take tours of the one-story white clapboard structure. The mansion, which is furnished with 19th-century furnishings and antiquities, had a role in the city’s general civil rights history and is now a museum. The museum preserves the history of the Underground Railroad, as well as the possibility that the home had a role in the covert escape network during the American Revolution. The museum also has exhibits about slavery, the slave trade, slave auctions, and the day-to-day lives of slaves in Memphis and the surrounding area.

See also

  • Tennessee museums, a list of Underground Railroad places, and the history of Memphis, Tennessee are all included.

References

  • Encyclopaedia Britannica – Underground Railroad
  • Information about the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum (Burkle Estate)
  • Information from Memphis Travel
  • Information from the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum (Burkle Estate)
  • Information from the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum (Burkle

Geolocation coordinates are 35°09′57′′N90°02′36′′W / 35.165933°N 90.043323°W

Slave haven / Underground Railroad Museum

When you notice the black and white Slave Haven sign on your front right and the white home set back from the street, you have arrived at your destination. Putting your car in park may be a good idea in this case. I’d like you to go back in time with me. It’s the mid-nineteenth century again. You have arrived to what would have been referred to be the fringes of the city formerly. There was a lot of unused space in this place. It is estimated that around 17 percent of the population was enslaved during this time period.

  • This was not a real train that went underground, but rather a network of hidden pathways and residences that went underneath.
  • For example, routes were frequently referred to as “tracks.” Stations or depots were used to refer to sites where people went to hide, such as the Burkle Estate to your right.
  • I picked the word “conductor” on purpose since it was the term used to refer to the escorts who ensured that enslaved persons were transported safely to and from stations.
  • He was the one who built the white house on your right.
  • When they take you below to the cellar, it is the portion of the trip that makes me the most emotional.
  • As soon as it was safe, they would make their way from the home to your right to the river, which is not far to your left, and then go north to the free states.
  • I’d also want to bring your attention to the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850.

That is why so many enslaved African Americans continued to flee north to Canada whenever they had the opportunity, because the Fugitive Slave Law did not apply in Canada at the time.

It will take around 1 hour to complete your appointment.

It is necessary to enter through the rear of the building to get into the house.

When you’re finished, come back to this location and choose Resume to begin the journey over again.

Do you know what kind of trees they are, or what they look like?

These trees are not native to Memphis and were introduced there.

See also:  Who Lead The Underground Railroad?

This particular variety of tree was chosen by him since it is a tree that remains green all year.

It was a fantastic way to commemorate the establishment of this safe haven. As we drive away from the curb, we’ll make a right turn at the intersection of Bickford Ave. Once you’ve round the corner, take a peek back at the home for a different perspective on the trees.

How to get to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis by Bus?

Stop here when you notice the black and white Slave Haven sign on your front right, as well as the white home set back from the road. Putting your car in park may even be a good idea at this point. Allow me to request that you return to a previous period of time. It’s the mid-nineteenth century now. It would have been appropriate to refer to your location as “on the outskirts of the city.” It seemed like there was a lot of unused room in this place. Approximately 17 percent of the population was slaves during this time period, and By utilizing the Underground Railroad system, many people sought to find their way out of slavery.

  • To ensure secrecy and confound the slave hunters, some of the railroad’s lingua franca was employed.
  • Stations or depots were the names given to hiding spots such as the Burkle Estate, which is to your right.
  • This was done on purpose, as “conductor” was the term given to the escorts who ensured that enslaved people were transported safely between stations.
  • On your right, you’ll see the white mansion he erected.
  • When they take you below to the cellar, it is the portion of the trip that touches me the most.
  • When it was safe to do so, they would go from the home to your right to the river, which is not far to your left, and then continue north to the free states from there.
  • The Fugitive Slave Law, which was passed in 1850, is also something I’d want to bring to your attention.

The fact that the Fugitive Slave Law did not apply in Canada was one of the reasons why so many enslaved African Americans continued to go north, whenever they could.

It will take around 1 hour to complete your consultation.

Come inside the house from the back of the structure on the left side.

When you’re finished, come back to this location and choose Resume to restart the journey.

Which of these trees do you recognize as being of a certain species?

Tennessee does not have any trees like this.

This particular variety of tree was chosen by him since it is a tree that is green all year.

It was a fantastic way to commemorate the establishment of this refuge. To begin, let’s back up to the curb and make a right turn at the intersection of Bickford Ave. Following the turn around, take a peek back at the home for a different perspective on the forest.

How to get to Slave Haven Underground Railroad by Bus?

To get step-by-step directions with maps, line arrival times, and updated time schedules, select the Bus route from the drop-down menu.

From Swift Kickz, Memphis

Station Name Distance
[email protected] 5 min walk VIEW

Bus lines to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis

Line Name Direction
8 National – Chelsea – Downtown VIEW
11 11 Frayser – Downtown VIEW
40 40 Downtown – Stage VIEW

QuestionsAnswers

What are the closest stations to Slave Haven Underground Railroad?

The following stations are the most convenient to Slave Haven Underground Railroad:

Which Bus lines stop near Slave Haven Underground Railroad?

  • Slave Haven Underground Railroad is served by the following bus lines: 08, 11. More details

How far is the bus stop from Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis?

  • 08 and 11 are bus routes that stop close to the Slave Haven Underground Railroad. Detailed information is available upon request

What’s the nearest bus stop to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis?

  • 08 and 11 are bus lines that stop close to the Slave Haven Underground Railroad. More information is available

What time is the first Bus to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis?

  • The 11 is the first bus that takes passengers to the Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis, which is located in Shelby County. It comes to a halt nearby about 5:15 a.m. More details

What time is the last Bus to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis?

  • The 11 is the final bus that takes passengers to the Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis, Tennessee. It comes to a stop nearby around 12:03 a.m. More details

Public Transportation to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis

Are you looking for directions to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis, Tennessee, United States? Moovit can help you discover the fastest and most direct route to Slave Haven Underground Railroad, as well as the best parking options. Moovit provides step-by-step directions from the nearest public transit stop. If you’re having trouble navigating your city, Moovit can assist. It offers free maps and real-time instructions. View schedules, routes, and timetables, as well as how long it will take to arrive to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in real time, on the Slave Haven Underground Railroad website.

  1. Take a look at this selection of stations that are the closest to your final destination: [email protected]
  2. These are the lines and routes that have stops in close proximity to one another – Bus:08,11 You might be interested in seeing whether there’s a different path that will get you there sooner.
  3. Utilize the Moovit App or Website to get directions from and directions to Slave Haven Underground Railroad quickly and effortlessly.
  4. Instead of downloading a separate bus app or train app, Moovit is an all-in-one transit app that helps you identify the best bus or train time available for your travel needs.
  5. Memphis Underground Railroad Slave Haven Underground Railroad Memphis Underground Railroad Slave Haven Underground Railroad The Burkle Estate, located at 826 North Second Street in Memphis, Tennessee, is a historic residence.
  6. The Burkle Estate is said by some historians to have been a stop on the Underground Railroad, which was a hidden network of way stations that assisted slaves escaping to freedom in the northern states.
  7. Jacob Burkle, a German immigrant who came to the United States in 1849, built the house on this site.

Public transit lines with stations closest to Slave Haven Underground Railroad in Memphis

While I’m ashamed that Memphis has been a part of my life for so long, I’m also excited that there is still so much more that I can learn about her and her culture. I’m ashamed to admit that half a mile from my house sits a house I’d never heard of before, but which is an essential element of the city’s history—and of American history—and which I’d never seen before. When I expressed similar feelings to our tour guide during a recent visit to the Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum, she assured me that she had heard them before and that she had no need to be concerned.

  • No part of the historical history, which was told to us through photographs and relics exhibited on the home’s walls and which recounted the transatlantic slave trade from its origins in Africa to its final arrival here in Memphis, was sugarcoated by her in any way.
  • For the first time, we sat in a room filled with objects that revealed some of the worst that our world has ever seen before we learned about Jacob Burkle, the abolitionist who owned this property that was formerly a stop on the Underground Railroad (and is now home to the museum).
  • Then I was calmed by her voice.
  • An army of angels is on its way to find me and bring me back to safety.” As we stood in front of a painting depicting the souls of slaves triumphing over their physical bonds, our guide sang these lyrics to us in a wonderful and comforting manner.
  • German immigrant Burkle operated a stockyard in Memphis, which had grown into “Tennessee’s greatest slave-trading metropolis,” according to the Associated Press.
  • He, like so many other abolitionists, put his life in danger in order to aid slaves in their quest for freedom.
  • We were standing in the dark, listening to each other’s breaths and feeling each other’s proximity.
  • It was awkward for me to confess my pain since I knew with certainty that the light would be switched back on soon and that we would be able to go up the stairs to our communal freedom shortly after.
  • They had nothing to do except wait.
  • The presence of God is in her midst, and she will not be moved.

Burkle resided on its banks, and I’m guessing he thought that God was in the midst of it all as he carried these precious people, often at the crack of dawn, to Memphis-docked vessels ready to transport them to a country where they weren’t subjected to slavery any more.

Slave Haven Or Burkle Estate Museum, Memphis

This is a historic mansion that is also rumored to have been the final halt on the Underground Railroad’s hidden route. This avenue served as an emancipation route for slaves and drew the attention of individuals of African descent. It was owned by Jacob Burkle, a German immigrant who worked as a baker and was born in the United States. This hidden subterranean passageway allowed slaves who had been forcibly transported here and forced to endure in appalling conditions to escape and then board boats to the other side of the Ohio River, where they might be free.

  1. The Burkle mansion included a cellar, which served as a safe haven for fugitive slaves trying to get away.
  2. As a result of Burkle’s death, the home was abandoned, and it was converted into a museum in 1997.
  3. The American Civil War was at its height during the time of the exhibition, and all of the artifacts, including furniture and paintings, reflect this period.
  4. Some believe that the term “underground” was not meant to be taken literally, but rather to represent the secretive nature of the procedure.

Slave Haven Or Burkle Estate Museum Travel Tips

  • The following are the additional ticket prices: $8 (for kids between the ages of 4 and 17)
  • Group pricing are offered separately.

Do you like it? Explore the whole list of things to do in Memphis before you make your travel arrangements. After a long and exhausting day, how about a decent night’s sleep? Look into where to stay in Memphis and make a reservation at a location of your choosing.

  • Slave Haven Or Burkle Estate Museum is located at 826 N 2nd St, Memphis, TN 38107, United States
  • Slave Haven Or Burkle Estate Museum’s phone number is +1-9015273427
  • Slave Haven Or Burkle Estate Museum’s hours of operation are 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
  • Slave Haven Or Burkle Estate Museum’s price is ten dollars
  • The best time to visit Slave Haven Or Burkle Estate Museum 02:00 Hrs is the minimum amount of time necessary to see Slave Haven or the Burkle Estate Museum. To plan your vacation itinerary, use the finest online travel planner available.

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  • Slave Haven or Burkle Estate Museum is included in the itinerary by 0.5/10 visitors to Memphis, or 5.16 percent of all visitors.
  • A visit to Slave Haven or Burkle Estate Museum usually begins at 2 PM, according to 66.67 percent of visitors.
  • 2 Hrs
  • Slave Haven or Burkle Estate Museum are normally seen in 2 hours or less by most visitors.

Monday, Thursday, and Friday are the days off. When visiting Slave Haven or the Burkle Estate Museum, the majority of visitors choose to go by automobile (95% of them). When organizing a trip to Slave Haven or Burkle Estate Museum, it is common for people to combine visits to the Memphis Zoo and the Sun Studio. * The information provided above is based on TripHobo traveler statistics, and it may differ from the figures provided by the company.

Items · Antislavery Usable Past

The National Great Blacks in Wax Museum, which opened in 1983, is dedicated to the history of African-Americans. Africology was founded by Drs. Elmer and Joanne Martin as a cultural and educational institution that is completely dedicated to the study of and preservation of African American history and culture. It is a one-of-a-kind organization in that it portrays the history it interprets via the use of life-size wax figures that are displayed in historical settings, making it really unique.

  1. Annually, the museum receives around 300,000 visitors.
  2. Beginning with portrayals of major personalities in pre-slavery Africa and progressing through dioramas of the space race and modern science, these exhibits span a wide range of time and geographic territory.
  3. A large number of these installations have a connection to the history of slavery in the United States of America.
  4. Others portray important figures in African American history, such as Henry ‘Box’ Brown and W.E.B.
  5. The abolitionist movement is represented in the installations by the characters of Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth, who both appear in the exhibition.
  6. Many of these dioramas also include models of children as part of their design.

For example, lynching is depicted in brutal detail in several of these dioramas, which emphasize the repulsive nature of the racial violence that ruled the United States at the time.

Best Things to Do in Memphis

1Meeting in Memphis, Tennessee

See also:  Who Made Underground Railroad? (Professionals recommend)

Rendezvous

Memphis, Tennessee, United States of America 52 South 2nd Street Rendezvous, a little restaurant nestled away in a back alley in downtown, is known as much for its nostalgia and atmosphere as it is for its rack of dry-rub ribs. Everyone who like barbecue should make a point of visiting this landmark establishment. There will almost certainly be a wait, but as with most BBQ, the wait and anticipation will be well worth it. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient.

Central BBQ

Memphis, Tennessee, United States of America 2249 Central Avenue Come for the pulled pork and dry-rub ribs, but don’t leave without sampling the barbecue nachos, barbecue bologna, and smoked chicken wings as well as the rest of the menu. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient. Memphis’ Commissary BBQ is a must-try.

Commissary BBQ

Germantown is located at 2290 South Germantown Road in Germantown, Tennessee, United States. Pulled pork is the primary attraction at this eatery that is not exactly in Memphis but near enough. A short journey from most sections of Memphis will take you to the original Germantown location, where a tablecloth with a black-and-white checkerboard pattern will greet you when you arrive. Make sure you leave room for the banana pudding. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet.

4 Memphis’s Bar-B-Q Shop is a must-visit.

The Bar-B-Q Shop

Memphis, Tennessee, United States of America, 1782 Madison Avenue Even in a location where barbecue is ubiquitous, the Vernon family’s inventive takes on classic dishes put them at the forefront of the culinary scene both locally and globally. Besides the expected pulled pork, sausage, and ribs, you’ll find “bar-b-q spaghetti,” “Texas toast barbecue sandwiches,” and the inventive “half and half” rack of ribs, which caters to the indecisive by serving both dry-rub and wet-sauced ribs on the same platter, among other things.

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HogHominy

Memphis, Tennessee, 707 West Brookhaven Circle, Memphis, TN, USA The Hog, which had been closed for two years following a fire that destroyed the original, has reopened with a rebuilt, upgraded, and nearly increased capacity as of November 2021. The menu at this restaurant, which is known for its wood-fired pizzas, offers chef Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman’s Italian cuisine, which is inspired by their Southern background. Cocktails are an absolute essential. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet.

6 Brother Juniper is residing in Memphis.

Brother Juniper’s

Memphis, Tennessee, 707 West Brookhaven Circle, Memphis, Tennessee, United States As of November 2021, the rebuilt, upgraded, and nearly doubled-capacity Hog will be open for business after being closed for two years following the destruction of the original by fire. Famous for its wood-fired pizzas, the food at this Italian restaurant, owned by Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman, is influenced by their Southern background and incorporates Italian cuisine.

In order to enjoy yourself, you must drink cocktails. Is this something you would recommend? There have been no votes so far. Please allow for a brief moment of silence. 6 Brother Juniper is residing in Memphis at the time of this writing.

Gus’s Fried Chicken

Memphis, Tennessee, United States of America, 310 South Front Street What more could you ask for in life than sweet tea, delicious sides, and spicy fried chicken? Oh, and perhaps some coconut pie as well. It is well-known for a reason. Visit the mothership in neighboring Mason, Tenn., or save time and visit the downtown Memphis facility, which will have been operating for two decades as of 2021, instead of making the trek. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient.

Gibson’s Donuts

760 Mt Moriah Rd, Memphis, TN 38205, United States Do you want a doughnut, but not a really nice one? Gibson’s Donuts is a Memphis institution that also happens to be the largest single-owner/single-location doughnut store in the United States. Also available till midnight in case you need a late-night snack after a long day at work. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient. 9Abner’s at Crosstown Concourse in Memphis is a popular restaurant.

Crosstown Concourse

1350 Concourse Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee, United States With 1.2 million square feet of space, a complete mixed-use campus inside a former Sears retail and logistics hub, now referred to as a “vertical village,” is exactly that. It’s sufficient to remark that it has progressed satisfactorily. Food, beverages, a name-brand brewery, events, shops, and more are all available for you to enjoy. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient. 10 MEMPHIS, Tennessee, United States – On November 12, 2016, Beale Street was illuminated by the neon lights of notable blues clubs.

Beale Street

Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee, United States This is the birthplace of the blues, where Marc Cohn famously went strolling 10 feet off of and where you can get a genuine sense for the heart and soul of the city, according to Beale Street (Downtown). A diverse collection of nightclubs, restaurants, and music venues (some of which combine all three functions), the namesakes on some of the neon signs include B.B. King, Jerry Lawler, Jerry Lee Lewis, and other notable figures. Weekend nights are ideal for adults, but families may find it more enjoyable to explore when the sun is still blazing.

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11 Memphis’ South Main Arts District is located on South Main Street.

South Main Arts District

Memphis’ South Main Arts District is located in the state of Tennessee in the United States. It is only one block south of Beale Street that you will find the South Main Arts District (Downtown), which is one square mile rich with history and authenticity. Check out the art galleries, eateries, and local shopping selections, which include hidden gems like South Main Book Juggler and The Broom Closet, among others. Visitors may either participate in the art walk and see the eight pieces, or they can print off a page from the website and embark on a self-guided architectural tour of the building.

The famous Orpheum Theater and the Civil Rights Museum are both located in this neighborhood (more on the latter later). Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient. 12Overton Square is a public square in Memphis. Photo courtesy of Shutterstock.

Overton Square

Memphis, Tennessee, United States, South Main Arts District It is only one block south of Beale Street that you will find the South Main Arts District (Downtown), which is one square mile of history and authenticity. Check out the art galleries, eateries, and local shopping selections, which include hidden gems such as South Main Book Juggler and The Broom Closet, among others. Take part in the art walk and see the eight pieces, or print off a page from the website and use it as a guide for an architectural tour of the building.

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National Civil Rights Museum

450 Mulberry St., Memphis, TN 38105, United States The killing of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., took place at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, and is considered one of the most crucial episodes in American history. The museum, which is built around it and has permanent displays on slavery in America, student sit-ins, the Montgomery Bus Boycott and Rosa Parks, the Freedom Rides of 1961, the Black Power movement, and other topics, is located nearby. Room 306 at the hotel itself, which was the room Dr.

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Slave Haven Underground Railroad Museum

Memphis, Tennessee, United States of America, 826 N 2nd St Witness history unfold at the Burkle Estate, which served as a station on the Underground Railroad prior to the American Civil War. As part of their endeavor to travel north to freedom, enslaved persons were given sanctuary in the real places, trapdoors, and secret tunnels that were revealed during the tours. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient. 15 On September 24, 2019, a sign depicting Elvis Presley greets visitors as they enter the Graceland complex in Memphis, Tennessee, United States.

Graceland

3764 Elvis Presley Boulevard, Memphis, TN 38105, United States The home has been demolished, but Elvis’ spirit, along with lots of kitsch, has remained, and it is all on show at the mansion and nearby properties where he formerly lived. The self-guided tours are supported by an iPad equipped with audio; all that is required is that you make the walk across the park. The Jungle Room is every bit as spectacular as it sounds. VIP and seasonal alternatives are available as add-ons to the tour, as well as a glimpse inside his personal planes.

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16 Memphis, Tennessee, United States – September 24, 2019: As the iconic Sun Studio has been referred to as the “birthplace of rock & roll,” it is hard to disagree. Sam Phillips recorded a lengthy list of luminaries at his studio, including Elvis Presley, who was one of his first clients.

Sun Studio

706 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee, United States Much of the history of American music can be traced back to this humble studio on Union Avenue, where Elvis Presley first recorded at the age of 18 alongside many other legends of the time such as B.B. King and Rufus Thomas; Johnny Cash and Carl Perkins; Jerry Lee Lewis; Roy Orbison; and many other stars of the time. Take a tour inside the studio and feel a connection to a piece of musical history. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet.

17 May 12, 2015 – Memphis, Tennessee – The city of Memphis is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Movement.

It honors the heritage of Stax Records and the artists that recorded for the label, including Isaac Hayes, Otis Redding, and many others.

Stax Museum

Seven hundred six Union Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee. The simple Union Avenue studio, where Elvis Presley first recorded at the age of 18, as well as many other stars of the period, including B.B. King, Rufus Thomas, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison, and others, had a significant impact on the history of American music. Exploring the studio allows you to feel a connection to the past of music. Is this something you would recommend? There have been no votes so far.

17 Memphians gathered on May 12th to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

There are numerous performers from Stax Records that are included in this documentary, including Isaac Hayes, Otis Redding, and many more.

Elmwood Cemetery

Elmwood Cemetery is located on South Dudley Street in Memphis, Tennessee, USA. This ancient cemetery was established in 1852 and enlarged during the Civil War to encompass 80 acres of old-growth trees and gardens, as well as historic buildings. Consider taking a stroll around the last resting place of more than 745,000 individuals, while taking pleasure in the well-kept grounds and thinking about how short and precious life is, and how lovely it is to be alive. Do you think this is a good idea?

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Peabody Hotel

149 Union Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee, United States ThePeabody Hotelis the center of everything. It’s significant in history. It’s just stunning. Among the hotel’s many attractions is a bunch of ducks that march into and out of the lobby fountain twice daily, complete with a rolled-out red carpet and velvet ropes to prevent passing passersby from tripping them. Not planning on staying here? It’s not an issue. On weekdays, they provide guided history tours for $10 per person, and the duck marches are available to the public on the weekends.

Drinking a martini in the lobby bar is another option that seems luxury without having to pay the high cost of a hotel room or suite. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient. Memphis Zoo (Memphis, Tennessee)

Memphis Zoo

2000 Prentiss Place, Memphis, Tennessee, United States The Memphis Zoo, which has a majestic entryway that resembles an ancient Egyptian temple, is difficult to miss. Upon entering, you may tour exhibits that include elephants, tigers, polar bears, and — whoooohoo! — pandas. Do you think this is a good idea? There have been no votes yet. Please be patient.

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