What Part Of Ohio Was In The Underground Railroad? (Correct answer)

The main entry point to Ohio was along the Ohio River and most notably was a small community called Ripley where John Rankin and a small group assisted 1000s of escaping slaves and started them on their journey on the Underground Railroad.

What part did Ohio play in the Underground Railroad?

Ohio served as the northern “trunk line” of the Underground Railroad, a system of secret routes used by free people in the North & South to help slaves escape to freedom. Escape routes developed throughout Ohio with safe houses where slaves could be concealed during the day.

Which city in Ohio was a stop on the Underground Railroad?

Following the opening of the Ohio & Erie Canal, Cleveland became a major player in the Underground Railroad. The city was codenamed “Hope,” and it was an important destination for escaped slaves on their way to Canada.

How was Ohio an important part of the Underground Railroad?

Ohio played a major role in leading escaped slaves from lives of captivity to their dreams of freedom. Canal systems, such as the Miami and Erie Canal completed in 1845, as well as motorized rail systems and freight trains gave slaves and their conductors options for escape.

Where was the Underground Railroad in northwest Ohio?

This Underground Railroad work was done in the heart of the Great Black Swamp of northern Ohio where travel was difficult and dangerous.

Was there any slavery in Ohio?

Although slavery was illegal in Ohio, a number of people still opposed the ending of slavery. Many of these people also were opposed to the Underground Railroad. Some people attacked conductors on the Underground Railroad or returned fugitives from slavery to their owners in hopes of collecting rewards.

Was Ohio always a free state?

It is true that Ohio was a free state, a state that prohibited slavery. Not until 1841 did Ohio enact a law so that any slave brought into the state automatically became free. Before then, Southern slave owners regularly visited Ohio and especially Cincinnati accompanied by slaves.

What cities did the Underground Railroad go through?

In the decades leading up to the American Civil War, settlements along the Detroit and Niagara Rivers were important terminals of the Underground Railroad. By 1861, some 30,000 freedom seekers resided in what is now Ontario, having escaped slave states like Kentucky and Virginia.

Where did slaves cross the Ohio River?

The Ross-Gowdy House in New Richmond is one of several Underground Railroad sites in Clermont County. For many enslaved people the Ohio River was more than a body of water. Crossing it was a huge step on the path to freedom.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Columbus Ohio?

According to research done by the Friends of Freedom Society, there are well over 20 documented Underground Railroad sites in Columbus, but since many of those are private homes, the addresses have not been made public. It was once the home of Robert Neil, son of the wealthy Neil family.

Who started the Underground Railroad in Ohio?

Beginning in the late 1840s, Levi Coffin, a resident of Cincinnati, helped more than three thousand slaves escape from their masters and gain their freedom in Canada.

Did slaves cross Lake Erie?

The abolitionists and former slaves that ran the Underground Railroad helped runaway slaves cross to Canada via Lake Michigan, Lake Huron, Lake Erie and the Niagara River. Captains of “Freedom Ships” are believed to have played an important role in helping stowaways escape, such as on the schooner Home.

Were there slaves in Toledo Ohio?

Sandusky, Grand Rapids, and Oberlin, Ohio, were other important locations. Within the city of Toledo there was a slave master who held a slave in the old Indiana House on Summit Street. Irish abolitionist James Conlisk and Toledo’s 14th mayor, Mavor Brigham, cut the slave’s chains and drove him to Blissfield.

Where were the underground railroads located?

There were many well-used routes stretching west through Ohio to Indiana and Iowa. Others headed north through Pennsylvania and into New England or through Detroit on their way to Canada.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Akron Ohio?

The Underground Railroad passed through Akron where slaves were assisted in their flights to Canada.

Underground Railroad – Ohio History Central

According to Ohio History Central This snapshot depicts the “Freedom Stairway,” which consists of one hundred stairs going from the Ohio River to the John Rankin House in Ripley, which served as a station on the Underground Railroad during the Civil War. Presbyterian clergyman and educator John Rankin (1793-1886) spent most of his time working for the abolitionist anti-slavery struggle. The home features various secret rooms, some of which were used to hide freedom fighters. An illuminated sign was erected in front of the home to signal that it was safe for anyone seeking freedom to approach it.

An underground railroad system of safe homes and hiding places that assisted freedom seekers on their journeys to freedom in Canada, Mexico, and other countries outside of the United States was known as the Underground Railroad (UR).

Although it is unknown when the Underground Railroad had its start, members of the Society of Friends, often known as the Quakers, were actively supporting freedom seekers as early as the 1780s, according to historical records.

As early as the late 1700s, slavery was outlawed in the vast majority of Northern states.

  • African Americans were forced to flee the United States in order to genuinely achieve their freedom.
  • Despite the fact that slavery was outlawed in Ohio, some individuals were still opposed to the abolition of the institution.
  • Many of these individuals were adamantly opposed to the Underground Railroad.
  • Other people attempted to restore freedom seekers to their rightful owners in the aim of receiving prizes for their efforts.
  • Over three thousand slaves were rescued from their captors and granted freedom in Canada thanks to the efforts of Levi Coffin, a Cincinnati man who lived in the late 1840s and early 1850s.
  • His house was perched on a three hundred-foot-high hill with a panoramic view of the Ohio River.
  • He gave the freedom seekers with sanctuary and kept them hidden until it was safe for them to proceed farther north in their quest for independence.

These individuals, as well as a large number of others, put their lives in danger to aid African Americans in their journey to freedom.

They typically chose to live in communities where there were other African Americans.

A total of eight communities along the Lake Erie shoreline served as embarkation locations for the freedom seekers’ journey to Canada, including Ashtabula, Painesville, Cleveland, Sandusky, Toledo, Huron, Lorain, Conneaut, and Conneaut.

It is still unknown exactly how the Underground Railroad came to be known by that moniker.

In 1831, a freedom seeker called Tice Davids fled from his slave owners in Kentucky, where he had been held since birth.

Davids had arrived at the coast only a few minutes before him. Following the arrival of his boat, the holder was unable to locate Davids and concluded that he “must have gone off on a subterranean path.”

See Also

  1. According to the Ohio History Central website. Photo of the “Freedom Stairway,” which consists of one hundred stairs that go from the Ohio River to the John Rankin House in Ripley, which served as a stop on the Underground Railroad. John Rankin (1793-1886) was a Presbyterian preacher and educator who spent a significant portion of his life to the antislavery cause. The mansion features multiple secret rooms, some of which were used to hide freedom fighters during the American Revolution. An illuminated sign was set in front of the home to signal that it was safe for anyone seeking freedom to enter the building. As a museum, the John Rankin House is a component of the Ohio History Connection’s state-wide network of historic sites, which includes the John Rankin House. Known as the Underground Railroad, it was a network of safe homes and hiding places that assisted freedom seekers on their journeys to freedom in areas such as Canada, Mexico, and other countries other than the United States. Freedom seekers were guided from place to place by white and African-American “conductors,” who were both white and black. Despite the fact that it is unknown when the Underground Railroad had its start, members of the Society of Friends, popularly known as the Quakers, were actively aiding slaves as early as the 1780s. By the 1810s, a small number of citizens in Ohio were assisting freedom fighters. As early as the late 1700s, slavery was outlawed in the vast majority of northern states. But even if freedom seekers relocated to a free state, the United States Constitution as well as the Freedom Seeker Law of 1793 and the Freedom Seeker Law of 1850 allowed slave owners to recover their property from them. Afro-Americans had to leave the United States in order to genuinely achieve their independence. Some Underground Railroad stations developed as a consequence, and these could be found across Ohio and other free states, providing freedom seekers with safe havens while on their trip to Canada. Some people in Ohio resisted the abolition of slavery despite the fact that slavery was illegal in the state. People in this community thought former slaves would relocate to the state, steal employment away from the white population, and demand similar rights as whites. There were a lot of people that were against the Underground Railroad. Conductors came under attack from a number of passengers. Other people attempted to restore freedom seekers to their rightful owners in the aim of receiving rewards for their actions. Ohio was home to a number of renowned abolitionists who played an important part in the Underground Railroad network. Over three thousand slaves were rescued from their captors and granted freedom in Canada because to the efforts of Levi Coffin, a Cincinnati citizen who lived in the late 1840s. Abolitionists dubbed Coffin the “president of the Underground Railroad” as a result of his efforts on their behalf. African Americans seeking freedom were accommodated at the home of John Rankin, a Presbyterian preacher serving in Ripley as a conductor. A three-hundred-foot-high hill overlooking the Ohio River served as the setting for his mansion. He used a lamp to indicate freedom seekers in Kentucky when it was safe to cross the Ohio River, and he would tell them when it was not. He offered sanctuary for the freedom searchers and kept them hidden until it was safe for them to proceed farther north. When John Parker, Rankin’s next-door neighbor, took a boat across the Ohio River, he transported hundreds of slave fugitives. In order to aid African Americans in their journey to freedom, these men and a large number of others endangered their lives. A number of the freedom seekers chose to remain in Ohio when they arrived there. In most cases, they chose to live in communities with other African Americans. Many of the freedom seekers carried on to Canada after their initial stop in the country. A total of eight communities along the Lake Erie shoreline served as embarkation locations for the freedom seekers’ journey to Canada, including Ashtabula, Painesville, Cleveland, Sandusky, Toledo, Huron, Lorain, and Conneaut. Wilbur Siebert, a historian, estimated that Ohio had around three thousand miles of Underground Railroad pathways. Uncertainty persists as to how the Underground Railroad came to be known by its current name. A story involving Ohio is one such example of this. When Tice Davids fled from his slave owners in Kentucky in 1831, he became known as the “Freedom Seeker.” A boat chased after Davids as he swam across the Ohio River. His holder was close behind him. Just a few minutes before him, Davids arrived at the shoreline. When Davids failed to appear after landing his boat, the holder concluded that he “must have used a subterranean path.”
See also:  What Was Underground Railroad Book? (Correct answer)

Underground Railroad

Wayne County, Ohio, was a hub for the Underground Railroad during its heyday. Fredericksburg, Shreveport, Millbrook, Wooster, Marshallville, Orrville, Smithville, and East Union are just a few of the cities. According to an essay authored by E. H. Hauenstein, there were two major routes that served as part of the Underground Railroad system. Slaves seeking freedom traveled north through Millersburg from the southern United States. They passed via Holmesville, Fredericksburg, Apple Creek, East Union, Smithville, and on to Seville and Medina, farther north in the state.

  1. The route turned eastward toward Akron.
  2. An outbound branch from Loudonville traveled north to Ashland and south to Sandusky.
  3. It is believed that there were at least twenty major roads leading north across Ohio at any given time.
  4. The Underground Railroad is associated with a number of well-known individuals and organizations.
  • The following people are named Battles: Thomas S. Bell
  • Charity Brown
  • Owen Brown
  • Timothy Burr
  • David Clark
  • Cheney, Hibben
  • Daniels, Isaac
  • Degarmon, Dr. Joseph
  • King, Leicester
  • Ladd, Benjamin W
  • McClelland, H. R
  • May, Daniel
  • Oldroyd, Charles
  • Eugene Pardee
  • Perkins, General
  • Rose, James
  • Seibert, Samuel
  • Taggart, Robert
  • Elizur Wright.

Some of the Abolitionist groups that were most frequently associated with the Underground Railroad were the Quakers, Covenanters, Wesleyans, Methodists, and other Abolitionists. The majority of them were well-liked and well-respected members of the community. Those who assisted escaped slaves were subject to penalties of up to $1,000 for their actions. In addition, slave organizations provided incentives for the death of anyone who were involved in assisting slaves in their efforts to emancipate themselves.

Early Wayne County, Ohio newspapers frequently contain articles on anti-slavery organizations, which is not surprising given the county’s history.

On February 15, 1837, the Wooster Journal and Democratic Times published an article on it.

  • The Quakers, Covenanters, Wesleyans, Methodists, and other Abolitionists were among the groups most frequently associated with the Underground Railroad. In the community, most of them were well-liked and well-respected. Criminal penalties for anyone who assisted fugitive slaves might reach $1,000. The killing of persons who were actively involved in assisting slaves in their quest for freedom was also encouraged by slave organisations. You may learn more about the Underground Railroad by looking at the department’s lateral files or by looking through the notebook on African-Americans in Wayne County, Ohio. Early Wayne County, Ohio newspapers frequently contain articles on anti-slavery organizations, which is not surprising given the county’s historical context. A celebration was held on January 25, 1837, to commemorate the founding of the Wayne County Anti-slavery Society. In theWooster Journal and Democratic Times on February 15, 1837, it was announced that the incident had occurred. You may find a printed version of this story in the binder titled “Afro-Americans in Wayne County: Second Baptist Church.”

The Underground Railroad in Ohio

Topic The Underground Railroad in Ohio
Time Period Early to mid 1800s
Keyword(s) Slavery, Underground Railroad, African Americans, Abolition
Grade level(s) 6-12
Learning standard(s) (Grade 8 Social Studies) History Strand: Historical Thinking and Skills, Content Statement 1; Colonization to Independence, Content Statement 4; Civil War and Reconstruction, Content Statement 12 / (High School Social Studies) American History: Historical Thinking and Skills, Content Statement 2; Industrialization and Progressivism, Content Statement 13

The Quakers, Covenanters, Wesleyans, Methodists, and other abolitionists were among those who were most frequently associated with the Underground Railroad. The majority of them were well-liked and respected members of the community. Those found to be supporting escape slaves might face penalties of up to $1,000. In addition, slave gangs provided incentives for the death of people who were actively involved in assisting slaves in their quest for freedom. Refer to the department’s lateral files and the notebook on African-Americans in Wayne County, Ohio for further information on the Underground Railroad.

The Wayne County Anti-Slavery Society celebrated its first anniversary on January 25, 1837.

On February 15, 1837, the Wooster Journal and Democratic Times published an article on the incident. Hard copies of the piece may be obtained in the “Afro-American in Wayne County: Second Baptist Church” binder, which is located at the library.

The Underground Railroad

The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County provided this contribution.

Additional Resources

  1. National Underground Railroad Freedom Center — “The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is a museum of conscience, an education center, a facilitator of discussion, and a beacon of light for inclusive freedom across the world,” according to the center’s mission statement. “It is located in the city of Cincinnati, Ohio.”
  2. A historical summary of the Underground Railroad and Ohio’s role in it is offered by the Ohio History Connection in this page titled “Ohio History Central: Underground Railroad” (subscription required). The National Afro-American Museum is located in Washington, D.C. Center for the Arts – At this museum in Wilberforce, Ohio, which is home to two historically black institutions, Wilberforce and Central State, visitors may take part in frequently changing exhibitions and special activities that celebrate African American history, art, and culture. Underground Railroad —A discussion and description of the Underground Railroad, as well as biographical information about abolitionists from the Detroit, Michigan region – Detroit Historical Society Underground Railroad

Teaching Guide

As a starting point, this guide will detail some possible ways for students to interact with digital content. It also includes recommendations for having students pull information from the examples given above. Guide for Participation in a Discussion (Download)

  1. In order to get to the North, escaping slaves would have to cross the Underground Railroad. After their journeys on the subterranean railroad, where would individuals who had traveled there choose to live? What towns and localities in Ohio did fugitive slaves pass through on their journey to freedom in Canada? Exactly where would fugitive slaves be hidden by subterranean railroad conductors
  2. In your county, do you know of any underground railroad stops that are still there and may be visited?

Activities in the Classroom (Download)

  1. Were fugitive slaves from other states uniformly welcomed in Ohio? Investigate the history of the Fugitive Slave Laws of 1793 and 1850, including how they influenced the operations of the Underground Railroad, as well as the perspectives of Ohioans on slavery during the nineteenth century. Visit the National Park Service’s list of official Underground Railroad locations for further information. Individuals or small groups can participate in this activity. Choose one to research for a brief presentation for the class (individual) OR one to research for a short presentation for the class (group) Divide the class into small groups and assign each group a different Ohio location for a group presentation. Imagine that you, or you and a group of people, have managed to flee the southern United States and make your way north
  2. Using the information you’ve learned about the Underground Railroad, write a first-person account of what it would have been like to make this perilous journey, either alone or with a group of other people. Consider the hazards you would face along the journey, the route you would take to get to safety, and how you would have felt about the individuals who assisted you
  3. Think about the people who aided you.

8 Places Around Cleveland That Were Once Part Of The Underground Railroad

Posted in the city of Cleveland 14th of February, 2018 Following the completion of the Ohio-Erie Canal, the city of Cleveland rose to prominence as a prominent actor in the Underground Railroad movement. The city was given the codename “Hope,” and it was a popular stopping point for fugitive slaves on their trip to Canada. Some of the most significant stations on the Underground Railroad in the city are still standing today. Please keep safety in mind while you travel during these unpredictable times, and consider adding locations to your bucket list that you can visit at a later period.

  1. The Cozad-Bates House, which is located at 11508 Mayfield Road in Cleveland.
  2. It’s the only pre-Civil War house still standing in the neighborhood; University Circle was a hotbed of abolitionist activity at the time, with the Cozad family taking a special interest in aiding fugitive slaves in the area.
  3. Madison’s Unionville Tavern is number two.
  4. The collection of stories that have taken place on the grounds, on the other hand, is what makes this edifice so remarkable.
  5. The slaves would be transported from the pub to the Ellensburgh docks, where they would get their first taste of freedom when they crossed the border into Canada.
  6. Abolitionists in the area were able to rescue Milton from his captors after he had been caught and beaten by them.
  7. It is stated that Stowe was influenced by Milton and that he was the inspiration for the character George Harris in Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

This magnificent structure, which dates back to 1835, has a long history of serving as a welcome venue for visitors.

Alanson Pomeroy, a Justice of the Peace who erected the house, would utilize it as a stop on the Underground Railroad only a few years after it was completed.

Painesville’s Rider’s Inn is located at 792 Mentor Avenue.

Another reason is that this location was seemingly involved in every early social movement, serving as a safe haven on the Underground Railroad and even a speakeasy during the Prohibition era.

5.

In 1850, William Hubbard and his family migrated to the region, and he became associated with the Ashtabula County Anti-Slavery Society nearly as soon as they arrived.

With a desire to assist others, William set up his property as a stop on the Underground Railroad.

Because the mansion is so close to Lake Erie, it served as a final resting place for many slaves before they were able to make their journey to Canada and achieve their freedom from slavery.

This magnificent edifice, which goes back to the 1830s, is widely regarded as the county’s oldest dedicated church and is claimed to be the oldest in Ohio.

The Episcopal Church, on the other hand, did not distinguish between concerns affecting the North and the South.

A fire ravaged the church’s wooden interior shortly after the war’s conclusion.

Spring Hill Historic Home is located at 1401 Spring Hill Lane NE in Massillon, Ohio.

In 1821, this lovely property was constructed for a Quaker couple who were well-known for their involvement in the Underground Railroad.

Despite several attempts, no slaves were ever caught during their time at Spring Hill, despite their best efforts.

Sloane House is located at 403 East Adams Street in Sandusky.

Sloane House is quite stunning, even in this photograph taken previous to its restoration (it is now a bright yellow color).

While living in Sandusky, Sloane studied law and regularly collaborated with abolitionist lawyer F.D.

When local law enforcement apprehended fleeing slaves at the behest of persons who claimed to be their owners, Sloane took them to court in one of his most audacious abolitionist deeds.

When one of the men produced ownership documents, Sloane was taken to court and fined $3,000, plus $1,330.30 in court and attorney expenses, according to the court record.

Sloane was born in Sandusky and grew up there.

Imagine the stories we would hear about the Underground Railroad if walls could talk.

Considering that few conductors ever kept documents or notes indicating their operations, many locations along the Underground Railroad and the exact number of people they aided remain somewhat of a mystery. Do you have a passion for local history? You’re going to enjoy these strange facts!

Cuyahoga Valley’s Ties to the Underground Railroad (U.S. National Park Service)

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress People of color were carried from slavery to freedom by way of the Underground Railroad from the time of our nation’s founding until the Civil War. The Underground Railroad was not a physical railroad; rather, it was a network of hidden pathways that led away from slave states in every direction. A large number of daring persons took part in it, including each enslaved person who attempted to leave or who offered food and guidance, freedom searchers who returned south to aid those fleeing, and free Blacks and Whites who offered assistance.

See also:  How Did Slaves Travel On The Underground Railroad? (The answer is found)

Image courtesy of the Library of Congress

Trail to Freedom

Who is the person you adore the most on this planet? Was it possible to leave everything behind and traverse the Underground Railroad to freedom? The choice to escape was not taken lightly, and it took time. Most of the time, it meant leaving behind loved ones and friends who may be punished as a result of your conduct. Nonetheless, some preferred to fly. Freedom seekers traveled by every mode of transportation available, including foot, wagon, railroad, and canal. It seems from letters and oral traditions collected by historian William Siebert in the 1880s that the Ohio Canal was used to convey cargo, which was a code word for enslaved persons in the time period.

Located between the Ohio River and Lake Erie, this 308-mile canal was a well-marked waterway linking the two bodies of water.

Others may have arrived in Cleveland disguised as canal boat passengers with aid from a friend of a friend, which was a typical code for sympathetic persons encountered along the route.

Until now, the only documented example that we have come across is that of Lewis G.

Law of the Land

“Involuntary slavery,” as it was defined in the United States Constitution, allowed people to own other people without their consent. Following that, regulations were passed making it illegal to help “runaways” and defining the areas where slavery may exist. A provision of the second Fugitive Slave Act, which was established in 1850, specified that anybody supporting a freedom seeking would be fined $1,000 and sentenced to six months in a federal jail. Also included were provisions requiring law enforcement personnel to help slave catchers and allowing them to examine people’s houses.

A Hotbed of Abolitionists

Slavery should not exist, and those known as abolitionists thought that it should not exist and campaigned to bring it to an end despite the hazards. Northeast Ohio was a hive of abolitionist activity during the nineteenth century. Men and women, Black and White, free and enslaved, came together to fight for a common goal in their struggle. Many people were participating in politics for the very first time. Northeast Ohio women formed anti-slavery societies, distributed petitions, served as delegates to state and national antislavery conferences, and produced editorials that were published in local newspapers such as The Anti-Slavery Bugle, among other activities.

  • The Free Blacks were a tiny but active abolitionist group in Northeast Ohio during the antebellum period.
  • They were able to gradually influence state legislation through coordinated gatherings and petitions.
  • When Malvin refused to be separated in church, he put in motion a wave of social activity that continues to this day.
  • Despite the fact that he did not mention it in his book, it is possible that Malvin supported freedom seekers who were attempting to flee through the canal system.

Cuyahoga Valley participates in the Network to Freedom through its Underground Railroad initiatives, which are part of the Network to Freedom. Ted Toth / National Park Service

Preserving the Stories

Slavery should not exist, and abolitionists thought that it should be abolished, despite the dangers they faced in their efforts. In the abolitionist movement, the region around Northeast Ohio was a hotspot. Males and females, Black and White, free and enslaved, all came together to strive for a common goal. Many were making their first forays into the political arena. Abolitionists in Northeast Ohio formed female anti-slavery organizations and disseminated petitions, serving as delegates to state and national anti-slavery conferences, and writing editorials for publication in local newspapers like as The Anti-Slavery Bugle.

  1. Located in Northeast Ohio, the Free Blacks were a tiny but aggressive abolitionist society.
  2. They were able to incrementally influence state legislation through coordinated gatherings and petitions.
  3. By standing out for his right to be separated in church, Malvin laid the stage for an upsurge in social activity.
  4. Despite the fact that he did not mention it in his memoirs, it is possible that Malvin supported freedom seekers who were attempting to flee across the canal.
  5. Ted Toth, National Park Service.

The Struggle Continues

Did you know that there are as many as 27 million enslaved persons living in the globe at any given time? The existence of slaves and traffickers may be detected in practically every country, including the United States, according to Kevin Bales, a consultant to the United Nations on human slavery and trafficking. We hope that the heroism of people who stood up against slavery throughout history inspires you to think more carefully about human rights and seek ways to make current society a more humane place to live and work.

The Ohio Human Trafficking Task Force can provide you with further information regarding human trafficking in Ohio.

Curious Cbus: Where Did The Underground Railroad Pass Through Columbus?

Published at 5:30 a.m. on July 30, 2020. Preceding the Civil War, thousands of individuals were able to flee slavery by journeying north through Ohio via the Underground Railroad, a loose network of safe “stations” where abolitionists and humanitarians provided assistance and refuge to former slaves. A letter from Darris Irvin to WOSU’s Curiosous Cbus, in which he expressed his interest in learning more about radio stations in the region. What he wanted to know was whether or not there was a record of Underground Railroad stations in Columbus.

  1. In Columbus, according to research conducted by the Friends of Freedom Society, there are well over 20 known Underground Railroad sites, albeit the addresses for many of these are not publicly available since they are private residences.
  2. It used to be the residence of Robert Neil, the rich Neil family’s eldest son.
  3. It was common practice to walk along rivers and streams in order to keep track of one’s movements from bounty hunters and their bloodhounds.
  4. It is currently being used as a child childcare facility after being recently converted from a funeral home.
  5. The congregation’s anti-slavery sentiments were strong in the mid-1800s, and the chapel’s basement served as a safe haven for African Americans who were fleeing bondage.
  6. When the Ohio Writers’ Program of the Work Projects Administration drew this map in 1936, it was considered groundbreaking at the time.
  7. The successful brick mason was also a member of the Worthington Anti-Slavery Society, which worked to end slavery in the area.
  8. Sites like as theKelton Housein downtown Columbus, the Hanby Housein Westerville, and the Livingston Housein Reynoldsburg are all noted for their roles as stations on the Underground Railroad in other parts of Central Ohio.

In addition, many of the structures that acted as safe havens are still in existence today. Do you have a question about our region that you’d want Curious Cbus to answer? Fill out the form below to submit your idea._

The Underground Railroad in Ohio

Nancy Dravenstott, Austin Kaufman, and Tami Sprang collaborated on this project.

Grade Level:

Using primary and secondary sources to answer questions about Ohio history, History/Historical ThinkingSkills2: History/Heritage7: Following the War of 1812, the United States was divided along sectarian lines. Ohio had a significant role in these problems, notably in the anti-slavery campaign and the Underground Railroad, which both originated in the state.

Primary Sources Used:

In the home, there are hiding spots. University of Louisville’s The Underground Railroad in the Kentucky, Ohio, and Indiana Borderland is an excellent resource. Spring Hill (picture courtesy of the National Park Service).

Other Resources:

Powerpoint: Underground Railroad (available at the Ohio State University’s Harvey Goldberg Center for Excellence in Teaching’s Slideshare.net website)

Lesson Summary:

It is believed that Ohio acted as the northern “tunnel line” of the Underground Railroad, a system of hidden pathways used by free persons in the NorthSouth to assist slaves in their escape to freedom during the American Civil War. Escape routes were established throughout Ohio, with safe houses serving as hiding places for slaves during the daytime. Homes that were once used by fugitive slaves on their way north along the Underground Railroad can still be found in many cities in Ohio today.

Instructional Steps to Implement the Lesson:

Beginning with the Underground Railroad power point presentation, students will study photographs of common hiding spots located in a safe house and react to questions that have been prepared for them. (preassessment) Guided Lesson: Students will continue to study the power point presentation about the Underground Railroad. Stops on the Underground Railroad will be marked on each student’s Ohio map, and they will be easy to find. Closing: Think-Pair-Share Strategy: Discuss the significance of the Underground Railroad in Ohio with a partner first, then with the full class.

Post-Assessment and Scoring Guideline:

Student responses will be written responses to the following question: “Explain the role Ohio played as a component of the Underground Railroad.” The teacher’s expectations are used to determine the final grade.

Materials Needed by Teacher:

Located in New Richmond, Ohio, the Ross-Gowdy House is one of a number of Underground Railroad locations in Clermont County. In the minds of many enslaved people, the Ohio River represented more than just a body of water. It was a major step forward on the road to freedom for me to cross it. Individuals opposed to slavery established a network of safe homes to provide assistance to escaped slaves who were seeking freedom along the natural boundary between free and slave states. Underground Railroad ties were strong in Clermont County during the time of the Underground Railroad.

  • The Mason-Dixon line, which runs between Pennsylvania and Maryland, functioned as a de facto border between free and slave states during the American Civil War.
  • Following Pennsylvania’s abolition of slavery in 1781, the Ohio River served as an unofficial line of demarcation between the states until the Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery in 1865.
  • John Rankin was a conductor on the Underground Railroad who became well-known as a result of his exploits.
  • He and his neighbor John Parker aided slaves in crossing the Ohio River and concealing them until it was safe for them to continue their journey.
  • For a period of time, the abolitionist journal The Philanthropist was published out of New Richmond.
  • Several historic landmarks still stand, notably the Ross-Gowdy Home, which served as the residence and office of Dr.
  • The New Richmond shoreline has been classified as a National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom site by the National Park Service (NPS).
  • Residents of those towns are reminded of the battle against injustice by historical buildings such as the Robert E.
  • Huber mansions, which are still standing today.
  • Learn more about the Underground Railroad in Clermont County by visiting one of the 33 historic sites on the Clermont County Freedom Trail, which includes 19 sites that are part of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.

Visit the Chilo Lock 34 Museum, which is open from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday for more Ohio River history.

Underground Railroad in Ohio

Wilbur Siebert, a history professor at Ohio State University, claims that the state possessed the most extensive Underground Railroad network of any other state, with an estimated 3000 miles of pathways utilized by runaways. It was possible to enter the Ohio River from as many as twenty different sites, and to escape the river from as many as ten different points along Lake Erie. Image courtesy of the Underground Railroad Monument. Cameron Armstrong, a student at Oberlin College, developed the term Terminology.

  • Using the term underground was appropriate because assisting runaway slaves was illegal and needed to be kept a secret.
  • Stations are locations where people go to hide or feel protected.
  • Agents are those who assist fugitive slaves in their escape but do not guide them.
  • Backstory The Underground Railroad (UGRR) was a network of safe homes, hiding sites, and forest pathways that assisted runaway slaves in their attempts to escape to freedom in the northern United States or Canadian provinces.
  • As early as the 1810s, other Ohioans were providing assistance to runaway slaves.
  • From one station to the next, fugitive slaves made their way north.
  • Owning slaves had been prohibited in Ohio since the state’s constitution was adopted in 1802, but some residents of the state continued to favor slavery.
See also:  How Many Slaves Made It To Freedom Each Year Through The Underground Railroad? (Correct answer)

These activists were adamant in their opposition to the Underground Railroad; some attacked conductors, while others attempted to return fugitives to their owners in the goal of receiving rewards from them.

This rule enhanced the likelihood that free blacks would be kidnapped and forced into slavery as a result of enslavement.

Runaway slaves were guided by conductors to the northernmost section of the state of Ohio, where they would spend the night before being carried over Lake Erie to freedom in Canada on the final step of their voyage.

The Underground Railroad was run by African-Americans.

There would have been virtually no opportunity for fugitive slaves to escape into freedom if they hadn’t been protected and assisted by free blacks.

Abolitionist newspaper publisher James G.

Colored individuals are virtually always in charge of such issues, which is not surprising.

It’s been a long and difficult road.

Work schedules were flexible, and slaveholders took advantage of the opportunity to travel during the holidays.

There were fewer cars on the highways due of the cold, yet there was little vegetation in the winter landscape because it was so cold.

Running away from home was made feasible by the regular freezing of the Ohio River, which allowed them to cross it on foot, although the ice was sometimes more like enormous pieces of floating ice, which needed precise footwork to make it safely over the river in the dark.

Aside from avoiding slave catchers, fugitives also had to escape roaming gangs of bounty hunters who searched the countryside in search of fugitives.

Under the Fugitive Slave Law, slaves could be traced down and returned from anywhere in the United States, but an escaped slave who crossed the Ohio River and crossed the Mason-Dixon Line was in relative safety north of the Mason Dixon Line.

Ohio was divided on the topic of slavery, and only a few places provided total sanctuary for runaways, with the town of Oberlin being the safest of these areas.

Oberlin, Ohio, was the site of Oberlin College, which was the first institution in the United States to accept females and African-Americans.

As they were aware that kidnapping Price in the town of Oberlin would be difficult due to strong anti-slavery sentiment held by the citizens of that town, they persuaded Shakespeare Boynton, the son of an influential Oberlin landowner, to lead Price to a farm west of Oberlin under the guise of digging potatoes for which he would be paid $20.

  • After realizing what had occurred, anti-slavery activists in Oberlin grew enraged and promptly formed an organization in order to launch a rescue mission.
  • The Ohio Historical Society provided permission to use this image.
  • Eventually, after several hours of tense negotiations, the captors allowed a small group of men, including the local sheriff, to enter the room in order to verify that their papers were properly completed.
  • Soon later, a number of Oberlin residents climbed through the window, and another group entered through the door.
  • After rescuing Price, his rescuers placed him into a wagon and returned him to Oberlin.
  • The Oberlin-Wellington Rescue played a significant role in mobilizing opposition to the Fugitive Slave Act in the United States.
  • In lieu of posting bond, they were sent to the Cuyahoga County Jail, where they stayed for the time being.

Abolitionist and civil rights activist Langston delivered an impassioned address in court that made a powerful argument for abolition and justice for “colored folks.” However, I stand here to state that if I am sentenced to six months in prison and a fine of one thousand dollars for what I did on that day in Wellington, under the Fugitive Slave Law, and such is the protection that the laws of this country afford me, I must assume the responsibility of self-protection; and if I am claimed as a slave by some perjured wretch, I will never be sold into slavery again.

I stand here to state that I will do all in my power to assist any individual who has been apprehended and detained, despite the fact that the inevitable consequence of six months jail and a thousand dollars fine for each infraction hangs over my head!

You would do so because your manhood demanded it, and no matter what laws were in place, you would be proud of yourself for doing so; your friends would be proud of you for doing it; your children for generations to come would be proud of you for doing it; and every good and honest man would agree that you had done the right thing in the end!

  • According to the judge, Langston will serve only 20 days in prison after being found guilty.
  • Further south, a number of settlements, including Columbus and Putnam to the east, Mechanicsburg and Urbana to the west, gave help to fugitive slaves, including Columbus and Putnam.
  • Organization known as the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society In 1835, the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was established in Zanesville, Ohio.
  • Despite the fact that Ohio was a free state, the Society was frequently targeted by local individuals wherever they conducted their meetings.
  • Fear was a significant motive among people opposed to the society’s ideals, and it was frequently demonstrated in crowds who attacked abolitionists on the streets.
  • When the abolitionist convention was held in a barn outside the city boundaries, a mob erupted and attacked the delegates and other attendees.
  • One of the state’s oldest communities, Putnam was founded about 1800 and merged into the neighboring city of Zanesville in 1872, making it one of the state’s oldest municipalities.

Putnam was home to numerous important abolitionists throughout the nineteenth century.

Both the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society’s conventions, held in 1835 and 1839, were held at this location.

Weld, who was speaking at the Stone Academy in preparation for the 1835 convention.

Additional violence was avoided as a result of the arrest of several of the instigators.

William Beecher, the brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe, served as the church’s first pastor after it was built in 1835, and many other anti-slavery speakers, including Frederick Douglas in 1852, have spoken here.

The Underground Railroad ran through southern Ohio.

There was a small community called Ripley that served as the primary entry point.

The Freedom Stairway is a photograph.

John Rankin is a Scottish author and poet.

Located on a three hundred-foot-high hill overlooking the Ohio River, his mansion included various secret rooms where runaway slaves might be secreted if they escaped.

Image courtesy of John Rankin House Ripley, Ohio is a town in the state of Ohio.

John Parker, a kindred soul who resided in Ripley as well, was responsible for transporting hundreds of fugitives from slavery over the Ohio River on a small boat.

Parker was taught to read and write by the doctor’s family, who also allowed him to work as an apprentice in an iron foundry.

He then relocated to Ripley, where he built a profitable foundry in the back of his home.

In a subsequent interview, John Parker stated that while the fugitives must, in most cases, take care of themselves south of the border, once they cross the Ohio River, they are in the care of their friends and family.

The majority of the time, slaves traveled northward on their own, looking for a signal that would indicate the presence of food, shelter, and rest.

Many will stay unidentified for the rest of their lives. Putnam Historic District (National Park Service) Underground Railroad – Ohio History Central, Inc. Ohio on the Road: The Underground Railroad in Ohio The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society is featured on Ohio History Central.

Exploring the Underground Railroad in Historic Springboro, Ohio

Lindsey Haney writes a blog for the company. Even though Warren County is referred to be “Ohio’s Largest Playground,” it is also home to some of the state’s most illustrious historical sites, particularly in the city of Springboro. Springboro, founded as a primarily Quaker hamlet, was formerly known as one of the nation’s most renowned safe havens for slaves seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad, and it still is today. In reality, today’s Warren County visitors may still visit more than two dozen of the town’s recorded Underground Railroad locations, including these four must-see destinations, which are listed below.

Long before tourists from Warren County came to stay in the mansion, the building was a refuge for fugitive slaves seeking liberation from slavery.

2) Main Street (South Main Street) Springboro’s South Main Street, which is now home to a variety of charming businesses and cafés, was originally a major station on the Underground Railroad and is now a historic district.

3) Heather’s CoffeeCafé (Heather’s CoffeeCafé) Springboro’s Heather’s Café may be a popular destination for coffee enthusiasts and those taking lunch breaks today, but the building in which the restaurant is located performed a very different function in the neighborhood decades ago.

4)Friends Quaker Orthodox Cemetery (Friends Quaker Orthodox Cemetery) This ancient cemetery, which is the final resting place for many prominent Warren County pioneers, veterans, and historical figures is steeped in both Quaker and African American history, according to the Friends Quaker Orthodox Cemetery website.

The cemetery continues to attract a large number of people who come here to pay their respects to those who sacrificed everything for their fellow men, women, and children while traveling the Underground Railroad.

Read on.

“Station Hope” a Harbor for Freedom Seekers

CLEVELAND, OHIO — A little over 200 years ago, Andrew Cozad and his family dared to be different.

They were successful. According to Chris Ronayne, president of University Circle Inc., the Cozad family was among the early abolitionists in East Cleveland Township and University Circle who aided in the abolitionist movement.

What You Need To Know

  • The city of Cleveland is home to the Cleveland Browns and the Cleveland Cavaliers. Andrew Cozad and his family dared to be different more than 200 years ago. According to Chris Ronayne, president of University Circle Inc., the Cozad family was among the early abolitionists in East Cleveland Township and University Circle who aided the abolitionist movement.

CLEVELAND (AP) — Andrew Cozad and his family dared to be different about 200 years ago. According to Chris Ronayne, president of University Circle Inc., the Cozad family was among the early abolitionists in East Cleveland Township and University Circle who were instrumental in assisting the abolitionist movement.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *