What Reading Grade Level Is What Was The Underground Railroad? (Best solution)

What Was the Underground Railroad?

Published on December 26, 2013
Age Group: 8 – 12 years
Reading Level: AR : 5.0 (1.0 Point, Quiz #165682) GLE : 4.4 Lexile® measure: 710L

How does the Underground Railroad help students meet standards?

  • The Underground Railroad: Escape from Slavery helps students meet the following standards sponsored by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) and the International Reading Association (IRA). Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves,

What was The Underground Railroad reading level?

ISBN-10: 0395979153. Reading Level: Lexile Reading Level 1240L. Guided Reading Level V.

Is The Underground Railroad appropriate for high school students?

Supporting the national Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in reading literature for high school curriculums, The Underground Railroad is an appropriate selection for grades eleven and twelve in language arts or U.S. history classes.

What type of book is The Underground Railroad?

Adapted from Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer-award-winning novel, The Underground Railroad is based on harrowing true events. The ten-parter tells the story of escaped slave, Cora, who grew up on The Randall plantation in Georgia.

What was the Underground Railroad by Yona Zeldis McDonough summary?

Including real stories about “passengers” on the “Railroad,” this audiobook chronicles slaves’ close calls with bounty hunters, exhausting struggles on the road, and what they sacrificed for freedom. In this thrillingly narrated history, the Underground Railroad comes alive!

Who was the Underground Railroad book?

The Underground Railroad Records is an 1872 book by William Still, who is known as the Father of the Underground Railroad.

Why is The Underground Railroad rated 18+?

Graphic violence related to slavery, including physical abuse, rape.

Is Underground Railroad rated R?

What is The Underground Railroad age rating? The good news is that this is a series that young fans of the original novel will be able to enjoy. It’s officially given a TV-14 rating, which means it’s suitable for ages 14 and up.

Why is underground rated TV MA?

It has many scenes of brutality, including whippings, stabbings, shootings, and deaths. The show is rated for mature audiences for good reason, as it captures the desperation of slave life and features some of the worst of human behavior.

Is Colson Whitehead married?

Whitehead lives in Manhattan and also owns a home in Sag Harbor on Long Island. His wife, Julie Barer, is a literary agent and they have two children.

Is the Underground Railroad a good book?

The novel received positive reviews from critics. Reviewers praised it for its commentary on the past and present of the United States. In 2019, The Underground Railroad was ranked 30th on The Guardian’s list of the 100 best books of the 21st century.

How do I contact Colson Whitehead?

Colson Whitehead

  1. Contact: [email protected]
  2. Speaking Engagements: Penguin Random House Speakers Bureau.
  3. Publicity: Michael Goldsmith [email protected]
  4. Photo: Chris Close.
  5. Upcoming events: 2021.

Does the Underground Railroad still exist?

It includes four buildings, two of which were used by Harriet Tubman. Ashtabula County had over thirty known Underground Railroad stations, or safehouses, and many more conductors. Nearly two-thirds of those sites still stand today.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

Will there be a season 2 of Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad Season 2 won’t come in 2021 Whether the series is renewed or not, we’ve got some bad news when it comes to the release date. The Underground Railroad Season 2 won’t come in 2021.

What Was The Underground Railroad?

It was a late spring evening in 1849 when the container came by overland express. A three-foot-long, two-foot-wide, and two-and-a-half-foot-deep box, it had been packed the day before in Richmond, Virginia, and then transported by horse cart to the local headquarters of the Adams Express Company. As a result, it was transported to a railroad terminal, put onto a train and, upon reaching the Potomac, transferred to an ocean liner. There, despite the placard reading THIS SIDE UP WITH CARING, it was placed upside down until a fatigued passenger knocked it over and sat down on it.

When the box arrived, it was met by James Miller McKim, the person to whom the package had been addressed.

Storytelling about the Underground Railroad offers the opportunity of moral consolation in the face of a really difficult historical reality.

In an article he wrote some years later, he predicted that future generations of Americans would come to share his feelings: “Now considered unworthy of notice by anyone, except fanatical abolitionists, these acts of sublime heroism, of lofty self-sacrifice, of patient martyrdom, these beautiful Providences, these hair-breadth escapes, and these terrible dangers, will yet become the themes of popular literature in this country, and will excite the admiration, the reverence Fortunately, McKim’s forecast came true quite quickly.

  1. After first appearing in our collective imagination in the eighteen-forties, the Underground Railroad quickly became a cornerstone of both national history and local tradition.
  2. WGN America broadcasted the first season of the drama “Underground,” which chronicles the lives of a gang of slaves known as the Macon Seven as they leave a Georgia farm in the early 1900s.
  3. “Passages to Freedom,” an anthology of writings about the Underground Railroad, was compiled by Yale historian David Blight in 2004.
  4. The Railroad’s operations in New York City were chronicled in “Gateway to Freedom,” which was released last year by Eric Foner, a Columbia historian.
  5. Tubman is the subject of a forthcoming HBO biopic, and the United States Treasury announced earlier this year that she will be featured on the twenty-dollar note starting in the next ten years.
  6. For more than a decade, the National Park Service has worked to establish a Network to Freedom, a nationwide network of Underground Railroad sites that are both officially recognized and locally administered.
  7. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad State Park will be dedicated in March of the following year.

Our respect, reverence, and outrage were all expressed by McKim with the expectation that these stories would elicit our response.

It’s unclear who came up with the phrase.

At the conclusion of a decade during which railways had come to symbolize wealth and development and three thousand miles of real track had been constructed throughout the country, it made its first appearance in print in an abolitionist journal in 1839.

Both of these characteristics are exploited by Colson Whitehead in his latest work, which consciously does what nearly every young child studying our history does naively: adopting the phrase “Underground Railroad” literally.

It was the psychically active elevators in Whitehead’s outstanding debut novel, “The Intuitionist,” that first indicated his fondness for magical architecture.

The method that he used before in “The Underground Railroad” is more or less reversed in “The Underground Railroad.” As an alternative to infusing mystique into a mass-produced box, he transforms our most emotive national metaphor into a mechanical device.

The Underground Railroad is one of Whitehead’s primary concerns in this book, and he wants to discover how it truly operated, at what cost, and for whom, among other things.

For more than a decade in the late nineteenth century, when many parents of Civil War dead were still alive to mourn the loss of their children and former slaves still outnumbered freeborn African-Americans, Siebert sought information about their efforts to assist fugitive slaves from slavery from surviving abolitionists or their kinsmen.

  1. An abolitionist group working undercover (through tunnels, trapdoors, and hidden passageways) and using covert methods (lanterns placed in windows and quilts hung on laundry lines) to assist enslaved African-Americans in their journey to freedom is depicted in that image.
  2. In that narrative, like in so many others we tell about our country’s history, the truth is in a precarious relationship with the truth: not quite incorrect, but oversimplified; not quite mythical, but overmythologized; in short, not quite true.
  3. Furthermore, even the most active abolitionists spent just a small portion of their time on clandestine adventures involving packing boxes and other such contraptions; instead, they focused on important but routine chores like as fund-raising, teaching, and legal help, among other things.
  4. Similarly, the theory that travelers on the Underground Railroad communicated with one another through the use of quilts dates back to the 1980s, and has no apparent foundation (thenineteen -eighties).

No one denies that white abolitionists were involved in the Underground Railroad; nevertheless, following researchers contended that Siebert overstated both the number of white abolitionists and the importance of their involvement, while underplaying or neglecting the role performed by African-Americans.

  1. However, the African Methodist Episcopal Church, which was founded in 1816 in direct response to American racism and the institution of slavery, receives little mainstream attention.
  2. Individuals, as much as institutions, are affected by this unbalanced perception.
  3. His book on the subject, published a quarter of a century before Siebert’s, was based on detailed notes he kept while assisting 639 fugitives on their journey to freedom.
  4. When it comes to anti-slavery campaigners, the risk they endured is inversely proportionate to the amount of credit they are given.
  5. A handful were slain, some died in prison, and others escaped to Canada because they were facing imprisonment or worse.

Those, however, were the outliers. Most whites were subjected to just penalties and the disapproval of some members of their society, whilst those who resided in anti-slavery strongholds, as many did, were able to go about their business with little to no consequence.

Cornerstones of Freedom™-Third Series: The Underground Railroad

Dramatic and pivotal episodes in American history are brought vividly to life in this series, which is intended to give youngsters the impression that they are present on the scene as history is being made. These titles, which are accomplished through text44, illustrations44, photographs44, and engravings44, complement the history44, social studies44, and geography curriculum, among others. There is an index included. ” data-displayprice=”6.71″ data-language=”English” The data-author=”Lucia Raatma” attribute is used to identify the author of this document.

Description

Dramatic and pivotal episodes in American history are brought vividly to life in this series, which is intended to give youngsters the impression that they are present on the scene as history is being made. These volumes, which include text, graphics, pictures, and engravings, are intended to supplement history, social studies, and geography curriculum in elementary and secondary schools. There is an index included. Dramatic and pivotal episodes in American history are brought vividly to life in this series, which is intended to give youngsters the impression that they are present on the scene as history is being made.

There is an index included.

Standards

If you’re discussing anything that the book states directly or making inferences from it, you should quote correctly from it. If you’re discussing anything that the book states directly or making inferences from it, you should quote correctly from it.

Product Details

  • This book has the following ISBN: 9780531265680
  • It is in the format of a paperback book, has 64 pages, and is in the genre of informational text. It is appropriate for grades 4 – 6. DRA Level: 60
  • Lexile® Measure: 1000L
  • Guided Reading Level: GR Level W

Cornerstones of Freedom™-Third Series: The Underground Railroad

This book has the following ISBN: 9780531265680; it is in the format of a paperback book, has 64 pages, and is in the genre of informational text. It is appropriate for students in grades 4 through 6. A 1000L Lexile® measure is used; a GR Level W guideline is used; a DRA level of 60 is used.

See also:  What Was The Most Common Way People Traveled On The Underground Railroad? (Perfect answer)

What Was the Underground Railroad?: McDonough, Yona Zeldis, Who HQ, Mortimer, Lauren: 9780448467122: Amazon.com: Books

A little excerpt of the material is available; double tap to view the complete excerpt. Double touch to view the abbreviated content if the full material is not accessible. A WEDDING IN GREAT NECK, TWO OF A KIND, YOU WERE MEANT FOR ME, and THE HOUSE ON PRIMROSE POND are among Yona Zeldis McDonough’s novels for adults, the most recent of which was published on February 2, 2016. Her other novels include THE FOUR TEMPERAMENTS, IN DAHLIA’S WAKE, BREAKING THE BANK (which has been optioned for a film), A WEDDING IN And for those of the New Hampshire locals who happen to come across the book, please know that she is well aware that the state flower is the purple lilac, not the lavender, as stated on page 8 of the publication!

  • She is also an award-winning children’s book author, having written a total of 26 children’s picture books.
  • The Simon Wiesenthal Center awarded the 2006 Once Upon a World Award to THE DOLL WITH THE YELLOW STAR, which was given to THE DOLL WITH THE YELLOW STAR.
  • Her newest children’s book, THE BICYCLE SPY, will be published by Scholastic in September of this year.
  • Yona has worked as the Fiction Editor at Lilith Magazine for more than a decade and is a published author.

Yona can be reached through her website:or through the Facebook fan pages for her novels, which she hopes you’ll “like.” To schedule a book club visit, inquire about editorial services, or simply to say hello, please contact her via her website:or through the Facebook fan pages for her novels, which she hopes you’ll “like.” YONA’S COMMENTS: When I was younger, I had no intention of pursuing a writing career.

  • As a matter of fact, I was determined to pursue my dream of becoming a dancer since I had been studying ballet for many years and was taking seven ballet courses per week by the time I reached high school.
  • For much of my childhood, I grew up in Brooklyn, New York, and I used to go the several libraries in my neighborhood on a daily basis.
  • I reread my favorite books over and over again, including Anne of Green Gables, A LITTLE PRINCESS, and A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN.
  • I also like reading a variety of other materials, such as comic books and publications such as Mad and Seventeen.
  • Sometimes you read novels that have a profound impact on your life, such as OF MICE AND MEN, which I read in sixth grade and absolutely enjoyed.
  • Some days, you’ll read the back of a cereal box or the front of a three-day-old newspaper if that’s all that’s available, because readers just need to read.
  • During my time as a student at Vassar College, I never took a single writing course.

I became so enthralled with the subject matter that I chose to continue my studies at the doctoral level.

Teachers, students, and classrooms were all people I didn’t enjoy being around.

It was similar to business school, but without the added incentive of a well-paying job at the end of it.

I, too, purchased a briefcase, but because I only used it to transport my lunch and the New York Times crossword puzzle, it didn’t contribute significantly to my academic achievement as a graduate student.

The university gave me permission to attend classes from other departments, and by this time I had recovered from my previous rejection, so I chose to enroll in a fiction writing class.

I had a “aha!” moment in this seminar.

I had an epiphany about what I wanted to accomplish with my life when it happened.

Following my final semester of college, I was hired for a position in which I had absolutely no interest, and I immediately set out to locate any type of freelance writing work I could get my hands on.

I wrote brochures, book reviews, newsletters, and everything else that was thrown at me by whoever needed a writer.

I was able to be a little more selective about what I wrote and for whom I wrote it because I was no longer working.

I was also writing fiction at the same time, short stories and a book, which was something that attracted me when I was still an undergraduate student at Columbia.

I currently reside in Brooklyn, New York with my husband, our two children, and two little, yappy dogs, all of which are adopted. I’ve been placing my latest novels in my own backyard, so to speak; Brooklyn has proven to be a rich environment for creativity in a variety of ways.

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead – Teacher’s Guide: 9780345804327

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR TEACHERS Instructions for Teachers The Underground Railroad is a term used to describe a system of transportation that allows people to flee their homes. Cora, a young African American lady who goes to freedom from the antebellum South via a magnificently conceived physical—rather than metaphorical—railroad, is introduced in The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead. The locations and people Cora experiences throughout the novel, which is told in episodes, furnish her and the reader with important discoveries about the consequences of captivity.

The reader is reminded of the importance of hope, of resistance, and of freedom via Cora, making The Underground Railroadan essential supplement to any classroom curriculum.

An understanding of the slave trade, slavery, and how it operated in the United States is necessary in order to make sense of the number of Africans who were enslaved and the historical legacy of enslavement that has lasted through Reconstruction, the civil rights movement, and up to the present day in the United States.

  • Most importantly, including The Underground Railroadallows readers to bear witness to a counter-narrative of slavery that is not generally covered in the literature on slavery.
  • Because of the Underground Railroad, we are reminded that her tale may be used as a springboard for bigger talks about racism, gender, and a slew of other critical issues.
  • When used at the collegiate level, the book is suited for writing and literary classes, race and gender studies, and first-year/common reading programs, among other things.
  • The prompts are organized according to the standard that they most directly support.
  • For a comprehensive listing of the Standards, please see the following link: warnings: There are multiple instances of violence throughout the text (sexual and physical).
  • Although teachers should not avoid exposing children to these events, guiding them through them via conversation and critical analysis will help them gain a better understanding of the consequences of enslavement as it has been experienced by so many people throughout history.
  • Activity in the Classroom Make a list of all the ways in which Cora fights against the dehumanization that comes with servitude.

Then hold a Socratic seminar to determine in what ways she is a “insurrection of one” (172) and why her resistance is such a threat to the system of white supremacy.Key Ideas and Specifics : CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3 Examine the consequences of the author’s decisions about how to develop and connect the many aspects of a tale or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  1. Even while whites continue to orchestrate festivals among the slave population in South Carolina, free people are free to congregate and spend time with one another whenever they choose.
  2. And what do these get-togethers have to say about community, kinship, and happiness?
  3. What aspects of South Carolina’s enslavement are similar to those of slavery?
  4. What characteristics distinguish South Carolina from Randall?
  5. Her reading materials include a Bible and almanacs, which “Cora admired.
  6. What role does the act of reading, and hence literacy, play in Cora’s ability to be free?

Consider, as well, how Ethel and Ridgeway use the Bible and religion to justify slavery: “If God had not intended for Africans to be enslaved, they would not be in chains” (195); and Cora’s observation: “Slavery is a sin when whites are subjected to the yoke, but not when Africans are subjected to the yoke” (195).

  • This is how Ridgeway describes his position: “I’m an idea of order.” Likewise, the slave who vanishes is only a fictitious concept.
  • If we allow it to happen, we are acknowledging the fault in the imperative.
  • Is there a “defect in the imperative,” and why is it critical for Ridgeway and the larger institution of enslavement that is reliant on Black people that this flaw be addressed and eliminated?
  • Mingo and Lander are similar in many ways.
  • What are the similarities and differences between these two guys and Booker T.
  • E.
  • Du Bois?

Examine the relevance of how each person who worked on the railroad—from station agents to conductors—was influenced by their jobs and the railroad itself.

Which concepts such as resistance, agency, and responsibility do these individuals hold dear to their hearts?

The ability to read and to be literate provided one with a tremendous instrument for comprehending the world and for liberating others from oppression.

Consider the significance of the Valentine library, which boasts “the largest collection of negroliterature this side of Chicago,” among other things (273).

What role does Cora’s experience play in articulating the relationship between freedom and literacy?

Cora’s grandmother, Ajarry, is our first introduction to her.

What role does Ajarry play in setting a good example for Mabel, and in especially for Cora, is unclear.

A comparison has been made between the episodic structure of The Underground Railroad and that of Jonathan Swift’sGulliver’s Travels by Colson Whitehead.

A station agent tells Cora, “If you want to see what this country is all about, I always say you have to ride the rails,” as he tells her he wants her to ride the trains.

What role does Lumbly’s appraisal play in framing Cora’s next phase of her trip once she leaves Georgia?

Cora travels the majority of the way by herself.

Years ago, she had taken a wrong turn and was no longer able to find her way back to the folks she had left behind” (145).

Also, how do her travels influence her perspective on the ever-present threat of sexual assault against Black women, as well as the general lack of protection for enslaved women?

Examine the Friday Festivals and the night riders to see how they compare.

What are the ways in which these occurrences express worries of black rebellion?

Instead, he and his family were sold and split apart by the government.

Gulliver’s Travels is the title of the book.

The notion of literacy for freedom is sustained by Caesar’s hunger for knowledge in what way is unclear.

Who was the person who started it?

The question is, how could this be both a “community striving for something precious and unique” and a threat to others (such as the residents in the nearby town, slave hunters, and so on)?

Is there a clear message about risk and return in this?

Why is Sam the only one that returns to Cora out of all of the agents she has encountered?

Look at page 285 and see how Lander responds to Mingo.

What is the role of illusion throughout the narrative, and why is this particular moment so important for the acts that follow?

“You have a responsibility to pass on something useful to your children” (293).

What is their legacy in Cora, and how has it been realized?

Examine the significance of turning the Underground Railroad into a real-world railroad system.

See also:  What Was The Underground Railroad How Did Southern Whites React To It? (Solved)

Create stations for students to study and debate each advertising based on a framing text (for example, “New Databases Offer Insight into the Lives of Escaped Slaves” from the New York Times).

What are some of the similarities and differences between the actual announcements and Cora’s version of them?

Knowledge and ideas are integrated in this process.

“That tale, like so many that we tell about our nation’s past, has a complicated relationship to the truth: not exactly false, but simplified; not quite a myth, but mythologized,” argues Kathryn Schultz in her essay “The Perilous Lure of the Underground Railroad” in the New Yorker.

For what reason is it necessary to emphasize African Americans’ participation in the abolitionist movement?

According to the Slave Memorial Act of 2003, “the District of Columbia shall be the site of a memorial to slavery to: (1) acknowledge the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery throughout the United States and its thirteen American colonies; and (2) honor the nameless and forgotten men, women, and children who have gone unrecognized for their undeniable and weighty contribution to the development of the United States.

” There are no national monuments dedicated to the enslavement of Africans in the United States at this time.

What is the most appropriate method to commemorate and remember the enslavement of African people?

Draw on examples from the book to support your reasoning as you create an artistic depiction that places Cora inside that lineage, stretching the history all the way to the current day.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.7 Research projects that are both short and long in duration are carried out to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; when necessary, inquiries are narrowed or broadened; and multiple sources on the subject are synthesized to demonstrate understanding of the subject under investigation.

One of the episodes should be chosen as a starting point for doing critical analysis and presenting findings from research on one of the issues listed below, along with an explanation of how that topic relates to the novel’s themes.

forced sterilization, settler colonialism, lynching, African Americans and abolitionism, African American slave rebellions, sexual violence against African American women, reparations, literacy practices during and after enslavement, the role of white women in slavery, maroons and maronage, racial health disparities, and reparations.

  • (Ta-Nehisi Coates, “The Case for Reparations,” The Atlantic, November 2005.
  • Social Theory, Sociology, “Settler Colonialism: An Introduction from the Perspective of Global Social Theory.” (E.
  • The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City.
  • NPR’s “Fresh Air” program.
  • Kathryn, “The Perilous Lure of the Underground Railroad” is a book about the Underground Railroad.
  • Works of Spectacular Interest Podcast with a historically black cast.
  • Ashley Bryan is a writer of children’s books.

Ava DuVernay’s Thirteenth (film) Strange Fruit: Uncelebrated Narratives from Black History, by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Alex Haley (film), Joel C.

Zora Neale Hurston’s novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, is a classic.

Promoting High Achievement Among African American Students, Young, Gifted, and Black (Young, Gifted, and Black), Theresa Perry is a woman who works in the fashion industry.

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is located in Washington, DC.

Gregory Christie is a writer and poet from the United Kingdom.

Heather’s book, Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery, is a must-read for anyone interested in African American history.

Author of Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom, Heather A.

Monroe Work is the website for the Lynching Project.

Kimberly N.

Previously, she served as president of the New England Association of Teachers of English and as the National Council of Teachers of English’s Secondary Representative at-Large for the secondary division.

A Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Illinois at Champaign, Dr. Parker is an expert in the field of education. WHAT THIS BOOK IS ABOUThtml /

The Underground Railroad – Book Review

It is an eye-opening, violent, and fascinating study of pressures that pull in opposite directions that Colson Whitehead’s compelling fugitive slave narrative is written in. While his pictures of slave life are firmly founded in tragic and difficult-to-accept truth, The Underground Train is also a physical railroad complete with locomotives and cars, which adds to the surreal feel of the novel. A greater knowledge of slavery and how it continues to effect racism today will be gained by readers who are willing to let go of the literal and enjoy theGulliver’s Travelsway that Whitehead illustrates Cora’s potential via.

The format, which is primarily based on Jonathan Swift’s work, is excellent in that it simultaneously reveals everything while simultaneously creating even more suspense and anticipation over the end.

The Underground Railroad

Authors: Michael Rajczak
Genres: History
Topics: 19th Century US History
Lexile: 940,
Publisher: Gareth Stevens
ISBN: 9781482406023,
Classification: Non-Fiction
Number of pages: 24,

Synopsis: Since slavery’s abolition during the American Civil War, the horrible truth of slavery has been well-documented. The daily reality of whippings, backbreaking labor, and persistent discrimination made it no surprise that many slaves attempted to elude capture. Fortunately, in the late 1770s, a network of individuals and safe places sprung up to assist these slaves in their quest for freedom. Readers will discover about the origins of the Underground Railroad as well as the many ways that slaves took to freedom.

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16 Children’s Books About the Underground Railroad

“There are no trains in this narrative!” says the narrator. I brought home a stack of books about the Underground Railroad and this was my youngest son’s reaction when he saw them. The fact that this railroad had no trains or tracks, however, was swiftly discovered by my lads, who rapidly realized that it may have been the most significant and powerful railroad our nation had ever seen. You might also be interested in these books about the Civil Rights Movement! This collection of novels will assist both younger and older readers in comprehending the harshness of slavery as well as the costly price of freedom for those who attempt to flee from their oppressors.

I hope you may learn something new and be inspired by what you read here.

16 Books About the Underground Railroad

Using the biography of an American hero as inspiration, Adler has written yet another outstanding picture book. This book chronicles Harriet Tubman from her upbringing as a slave in Maryland to her emancipation via the Underground Railroad, and then to her return to the South to aid in the emancipation of other African-Americans. It also depicts her life during and after the Civil War, during which she continued to serve others and fight for justice for the rights of women. My recommendation for readers ages 5 and above is to read any of Adler’s biographies.

Follow the Drinking Gourdby Bernadine Connelly

This novel, which is inspired on the popular American folk song of the same name, tells the story of one family’s escape from slavery through the Underground Railroad system. A good example of how persons fleeing to freedom would follow natural clues like the stars in order to locate the north is illustrated in this book. I would suggest this book for children aged 5 and higher. This story is also available on DVD, with Morgan Freeman providing the narration.

Henry’s Freedom Boxby Ellen Levine

Beginning when he was taken away from his family at an early age and continuing into adulthood, when his wife and children are sold to another slave master, Henry has always dreamt of being free. When it comes to becoming free, Henry comes up with an innovative solution: he will mail himself to the North! His arduous voyage in a shipping container is ultimately worth it since he receives a prize. Based on a true story, I recommend that children between the ages of 4 and 8 read this book aloud.

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quiltby Deborah Hopkinson

In the midst of her enslavement and sewn-up existence, a young lady named Clara dreams of achieving freedom, both for herself and for her family. Sometime later, she overhears two other slaves discussing something known as the Underground Railroad, and she understands that she may use her abilities as a seamstress to assist others in their journeys toward freedom.

It is her dream to create a quilt from scraps of cloth, which can also serve as a map to help her find her way to freedom in the North, thanks to the Underground Railroad. Sharing this book with youngsters aged three and up is highly recommended.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroadby Henry Cole

It is just the hauntingly beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period in this frightening picture book; there are no words. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision about her future. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor lurking in the shadows? Do you think she’ll go with the flow and follow her heart and compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroadby Pamela Duncan Edwards

With no words, only eerily beautiful drawings depict the seriousness of the historical period depicted in this chilling picture book. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision that will affect her future. What happens when she notices an unexpected invader lurking in the shadows? Does she notify anyone? Either that, or she chooses to follow her heart and compassion. Even though this is a really emotional novel, smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is going on in the plot.

Almost to Freedomby Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

With no words, only eerily beautiful drawings depict the seriousness of the historical period depicted in this frightening picture book. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult choice. Is she able to raise the alarm and inform someone about this unexpected invader hidden in the shadows? Alternatively, does she follow her heart and her sense of compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in comprehending what is occurring in the plot.

The Birdmanby Troon Harrison

This frightening picture book contains no text, simply eerily beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor who is lurking in the shadows? Or does she go with her heart and her feeling of compassion? This is a really emotional novel, although smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

See also:  Famous Slaves Who Helped Transport Slaves In The Underground Railroad? (Solved)

Blacksmith’s Songby Elizabeth Van Steenwyk

It is just the hauntingly beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period in this frightening picture book; there are no words. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision about her future. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor lurking in the shadows?

Do you think she’ll go with the flow and follow her heart and compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot. I recommend that it be shared with children aged 5 and up.

Before She Was Harrietby Lesa Cline-Ransome

With no words, only eerily beautiful drawings depict the seriousness of the historical period depicted in this chilling picture book. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision that will affect her future. What happens when she notices an unexpected invader lurking in the shadows? Does she notify anyone? Either that, or she chooses to follow her heart and compassion. Even though this is a really emotional novel, smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is going on in the plot.

Chapter Books and Early Readers

As Emma pays a visit to the Anacostia Museum for African American History, she finds herself transported back in time and forced to go via the Underground Railroad to freedom. Will she be able to make it out of slavery without being apprehended by the authorities? This early reader is jam-packed with information, and it is ideal for children who are reading at or above the second grade level.

What Was the Underground Railroad?by Yona Zeldis McDonough

As Emma pays a visit to the Anacostia Museum for African American History, she finds herself transported back in time and forced to walk the Underground Railroad in search of her liberation. What are the chances that she will be able to escape slavery without being discovered? Children who are reading at or above the second grade level will benefit from this early reader’s wealth of knowledge.

Eliza’s Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diaryby Jerdine Nolen

In the aftermath of Eliza’s mother’s sale to a new family, all Eliza has left to recall is her quilt and the stories she used to tell. When Eliza’s mistress becomes ill, she begins to hear rumors about her being sold, and she realizes that her time has come. The words of her mother and the farmhand Joe guide her down the Underground Railroad, and before long, she is being guided by a gentle woman named Harriet into slavery. If your child is reading at or above the fourth grade level, this fictitious journal of a 12-year-old house slave in Virginia is a fantastic choice for them.

Dear Austin: Letters From the Underground Railroadby Elvira Woodruff

Levi has formed a friendship with a young child named Jupiter, who happens to be the son of a former slave. They have a lot of fun together, playing and enjoying the Pennsylvania countryside. When Jupiter’s sister is abducted by a slave trader, Levi and Jupiter come up with a scheme to free her from being sold into slavery. Naive Levi immediately learns how dire the position of the slaves is, and he communicates his observations to his brother, Austin, through letters sent to and from the slaves.

Stealing Freedomby Elisa Carbone

Abolitionist Anna Maria Weems was born into slavery, and that is the only way she has ever known existence. Her family is her one source of happiness in life; being able to spend time with them is what makes life tolerable for her. Although being a slave frequently meant being apart from family, Anna eventually finds herself alone and without the people she cared about. She is consumed by sadness and performs the only move that appears to make sense: she flees the scene.

As a guy, Anna sets out to discover independence as well as her family, which she believes she can’t find otherwise. This novel is based on a true tale, and it is recommended for readers aged 11 and above.

Bradyby Jean Fritz

It is the only life Anna Maria Weems knows because she was born into slavery. Family is her greatest source of happiness in life; being able to spend time with them is what makes it tolerable for her. Because slavery frequently meant separation from family, Anna eventually finds herself alone and without the ones she cherished most. She is consumed by grief, and the only thing that appears to make sense is for her to flee the situation. As a guy, Anna sets out to pursue freedom as well as her family, which she believes she will never see again.

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Description

A fleeing slave family has been guided to Deacon Fuller’s house, which serves as a halt on the Underground Railroad, by the stars of the Big Dipper. Will Tommy Fuller be able to keep the runaways hidden from a search party—or will the secret passengers be discovered and the runaways’ hopes of achieving freedom be dashed for good? This Level 3 I Can Read book is a gripping first-person historical fiction narrative of the Underground Railroad, told through the eyes of Tommy, a ten-year-old Quaker boy, who is narrated by his grandfather.

An afterword by author F.N.

It contributes to the Common Core Learning Standards (CCLS).

About the Author

Anita Lobel drew two more famous I Can Read Books written by the late F. N. Monjo, author of The Drinking Gourd, including Indian Summer, drawn by Anita Lobel, and The One Bad Thing About Father, illustrated by Rocco Negri.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroad

Cooperative Children’s Book Center is the source for this review. Henry Cole is the author of the book. The images, done in black pencil on buff-colored sheets, depict a wordless narrative set during the American Civil War. The first page spread depicts a quilt with the North Star design hanging on a rail fence, which is followed by a scenario of Confederate troops riding across a field surrounding the fence. On the farm, a young white girl is helping out with chores. She looks around the barn and notices a solitary eye staring out from behind a shock of corn.

  1. Two men on the trail of a fugitive slave leave with the additional horse they brought along, which is still without a rider.
  2. Unspokenby Henry Cole is a fictional character created by American author Henry Cole in the early 1900s.
  3. Cole is a fictional character created by Henry Cole in the early 1900s.
  4. ISBN:9780545399975 Cooperative Children’s Book Center is the source for this review.
  5. Synopsis provided by the publisher: In this heartbreaking, wordless narrative, a little girl’s courage is put to the test.
  6. However, the stranger’s scared gaze weighs heavily on her conscience, and she is forced to make a tough decision.
  7. The girl and the runaway are brought together by unspoken gifts of humanity as they go on separate journeys: one following the North Star, the other following her heart.

Henry Cole’s distinctive and creative depiction of the Underground Railroad communicates straight to our most primal feelings of compassion and empathy for others.

Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story from the Underground Railroad

Cooperative Children’s Book Center is the source of this review. His Name Is Henry Cole, and He Wrote the Book A wordless narrative set during the Civil War is illustrated entirely in black pencil on buff-colored pages. Page spread one has a quilt with the North Star design draped over a rail fence, which is followed by a scene of Confederate troops riding across a field surrounding the fence on the next page. On the farm, a young white girl is helping out with the chores and other tasks. One eye peeping out from a shock of corn is all she can see inside the barn.

  • Despite the fact that they packed an extra horse, two men in quest of a fugitive slave leave with the horse still without a rider.
  • Afro-American, slavery, and U.S.
  • Pages:40 Preschool through kindergarten and grades 1-2 are appropriate reading levels for this age group.
  • Powell’s Books is a great place to start.
  • In this heartbreaking, wordless narrative, a little girl’s courage is put to the test.
  • A tough decision must be made, though, for the stranger’s scared eyes weigh heavily on her conscience.
  • While on their own journeys, the girl and the fugitive are united by the unspoken gifts of humanity that they both possess: one is guided by the North Star, the other by her heart.

Henry’s Freedom BoxReading Levels

Grades 2-5 DRA are most interested in Level:38 380L is the Lexile Measurement. 1.9 grade level equivalent Individual Reading: PRead-Aloud vs. Guided Reading: PRead-Aloud Because the reading level will be too high for the majority of children in second and third grade, this book will need to be read aloud rather than assigned as individual reading for these children. It is possible that some third graders will be able to read this book on their own by the end of the school year. These are books that should be read independently by fourth and fifth grade students.

See InsideHenry’s Freedom Box

The following are two sample pages from Henry’s Freedom Box: A True Story from the Underground Railroad, which may be found on Amazon. What a stunningly drawn book this is! It is on the left that we see a portrait of the main character, Henry, as a youngster, and on the right that we see Henry visiting his ailing master, who has summoned Henry.

Henry considered the possibility that his lord would release him, as some slaves were emancipated upon the death of their masters in the past. Unfortunately, this was not the reason for his summons to the master’s office.

Henry’s Freedom BoxLesson / Activity Ideas

“Can you tell me what’s in the box?” Lesson Bring in a cardboard box that is just large enough to fit a person inside on the day you are going to read this novel to your class. “Use caution when handling.” “This side up.” should be written on the front of the box, and it should be placed in a conspicuous location in the room. Students will be curious in what’s inside as soon as they see it for the first time. Remove yourself from the situation. You want them to look at the package with interest and remain inquisitive.

  1. Some kids will realize right away that the mystery box has anything to do with this narrative.
  2. As soon as you are finished with the reading, ask the kids what they were doing at am and pm the previous day.
  3. Consider what it would be like to have been locked up in that box since yesterday (replace “your soccer game/you left school” with whatever the kids’ response to the 27-hour question was).
  4. Discuss.

Where to now?

Now that you’ve seen this fantastic book, what would you like to see in the future? Please keep in mind that, as an Amazon Associate, we receive a commission from eligible purchases.

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