What Routes Did The Underground Railroad Follow Through Maryland? (Professionals recommend)

There were many different routes that enslaved people took as they traveled north to freedom. One route out of Maryland was that frequently used by Harriet Tubman. She led her groups, beginning on foot, up the Eastern Shore of Maryland and into Delaware. Several stations were in the vicinity of Wilmington, Delaware.

  • What routes did the Underground Railroad follow through Maryland? There were many different routes that enslaved people took as they traveled north to freedom. One route out of Maryland was that frequently used by Harriet Tubman. She led her groups, beginning on foot, up the Eastern Shore of Maryland and into Delaware.

Was there an Underground Railroad in Maryland?

Maryland’s Eastern Shore The Eastern Shore was the birthing ground of several famous and lesser-known Underground Railroad leaders, such as Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and Henry Highland Garnet.

What routes did the Underground Railroad follow?

Routes. Underground Railroad routes went north to free states and Canada, to the Caribbean, into United States western territories, and Indian territories. Some freedom seekers (escaped slaves) travelled South into Mexico for their freedom.

Where was the Underground Railroad located in Maryland?

The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park (HATU) memorializes this legacy not through physical structures, but by instead through the landscape in Tubman’s native Dorchester County, Maryland which has been preserved by private and public stewards.

What was the most common route in the Underground Railroad?

One hero of the Underground Railroad was Levi Coffin, a Quaker who is said to have helped around 3,000 slaves gain their freedom. The most common route for people to escape was north into the northern United States or Canada, but some slaves in the deep south escaped to Mexico or Florida.

What part of Maryland did Harriet Tubman escape from?

Poplar Neck, Md. Not only is it home to Mount Pleasant Cemetery, but it’s also where Tubman herself escaped slavery in 1849 and would return later, in 1857, to rescue her parents from their then-owner, Dr. Thompson, who owned 2,200 acres of this area.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Baltimore?

Baltimore was a major station on the Underground Railroad that began in Georgia and the Carolinas and passed through Virginia. The route continued through Central Maryland and into Pennsylvania. Most of these secret trails did not involve traditional 19th century railroads — steam locomotives and passenger cars.

How many Underground Railroad routes were there?

There were four main routes that the enslaved could follow: North along the Mississippi and Ohio rivers to the northern United States and Canada; South to Florida and refuge with the Seminole Indians and to the Bahamas; West along the Gulf of Mexico and into Mexico; and East along the seaboard into Canada.

Where is the Underground Railroad Fallout 4?

The Old North Church is the last spot on Fallout 4’s Freedom Trail, with the Railroad residing within. You’ll have to clear the place of some Feral Ghouls, then head to the basement, which can be found to the back right upon entering the church.

How many routes did Harriet Tubman have?

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the most well-known of all the Underground Railroad’s “conductors.” During a ten-year span she made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom. And, as she once proudly pointed out to Frederick Douglass, in all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.”

Which state has the most underground railroads?

Although there were Underground Railroad networks throughout the country, even in the South, Ohio had the most active network of any other state with around 3000 miles of routes used by escaping runaways.

How old would Harriet Tubman be today?

Harriet Tubman’s exact age would be 201 years 10 months 28 days old if alive. Total 73,747 days. Harriet Tubman was a social life and political activist known for her difficult life and plenty of work directed on promoting the ideas of slavery abolishment.

How long was the Underground Railroad journey?

The journey would take him 800 miles and six weeks, on a route winding through Maryland, Pennsylvania and New York, tracing the byways that fugitive slaves took to Canada and freedom.

How far did the Underground Railroad stretch?

The length of the route to freedom varied but was often 500 to 600 miles. Those who were strong—and lucky—might make it to freedom in as little as two months. For others, the journey could last more than a year. Harriet Tubman was one of the most famous conductors along the Underground Railroad.

Pathways to Freedom

The audio element cannot be played because your browser does not support it. As you read this chapter, pay attention to the audio! What routes did the Underground Railroad take across Maryland, and how did they differ from one another? The paths used by enslaved persons on their journey northward to freedom were numerous and varied. One of the routes out of Maryland that Harriet Tubman usually took was the Route of the Underground Railroad. She guided her groups along the Eastern Shore of Maryland and into Delaware, starting on foot and working their way up.

They continued their journey from Delaware to Philadelphia or other locations in southeastern Pennsylvania.

Some went to Massachusetts or New York, while others went to California.

Escapees boarded boats that traveled up the Chesapeake Bay, where they hoped to find safety.

  1. Baltimore was the most populous of these cities.
  2. Many of the ship’s pilots were African Americans who assisted fugitives by concealing them and escorting them to safety.
  3. It was usual to see African American males aboard ships since so many black people, both free and enslaved, worked as sailors.
  4. How were enslaved persons able to travel by rail or ship without being found by authorities?

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Scenic Byway

MD 16, MD 14, MD 331, MD 313 and MD 287 are the routes that take you 51.7 miles. Directions As soon as you’ve completed the southern portion of your journey, head north to the East New Market National Historic District, where you can stop for antique shopping along the way before embarking on a self-guided walking tour that takes you past beautiful examples of 18th-, 19th-, and 20th-century architecture. Faith Community United Methodist Church, which is located near a historic railroad station, should be on your list to visit.

  • Samuel Green, a free black farmer and Underground Railroad agent who was also a trustee.
  • The home of Jacob and Hannah Leverton, Quaker abolitionists, and the site of a historic Quaker meeting house near Mt.
  • In Preston, the settlement of Choptank Landing is located on Poplar Neck, just a few miles away from the town of Linchester.
  • She rescued herself, then returned to this location to rescue her brothers, and then her parents, who had been trapped in this region.
  • The 1852James Webb Cabin, located near the town of Preston, is the only surviving pre-Civil War log cabin on the Eastern Shore that has been shown to have been built by and for an African American family.
  • The next destination is Denton, which has a long history of association with the Underground Railroad.
  • The neighboring Tuckahoe Neck Meeting House, which was erected in 1803 and hosted renowned Quaker women speakers who were acquainted with Tubman, was dedicated to her memory.

From here, you may either continue north via the historic towns of Greensboro and Goldsboro until you reach the Mason-Dixon line near the Delaware border, or you can follow the Wye Mills side road from Denton to the Mason-Dixon line.

Side Track to Hillsboro from Denton

One-way distance is 8.3 miles. Directions via MD 404 | MD 404 | Travel west on MD 404 at Denton to read about Frederick Douglass, the famed 19th-century orator and statesman who opened his autobiography with the words, “I was born in Tuckahoe, near Hillsborough, and about 12 miles from Easton.” Take a look at the spot where Frederick Douglass began his voyage via St. Michael’s, Annapolis, Baltimore, and other sites along the Chesapeake Bay before escaping his slavery and rising to the position of abolitionist leader.

Related information

One-way distance is 8.3 kilometers. directions via MD 404 | To take a detour, go west on MD 404 at Denton to read about Frederick Douglass, the famed 19th-century orator and statesman who opened his autobiography with the words, “I was born in Tuckahoe, near Hillsborough, and approximately 12 miles from Easton.” Take a look at the spot where Frederick Douglass began his voyage via St. Michael’s, Annapolis, Baltimore, and other sites along the Chesapeake Bay before ultimately escaping from slavery and rising to the position of abolitionist leader.

  • This page contains information about the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, including certified host businesses, a map (pdf), a guide (pdf), a digital guide, and a mail order form. This page also contains information about the Maryland’s Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Guide (pdf), and an exploration of the Maryland’s Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.

International Underground Railroad Month in Maryland, Part I: “I See the Underground Railroad Everywhere”

Q A has been compiled By Ennis Barbery Smith, Assistant Administrator for the Mental Health and Addictions Administration In addition to natural transit routes, the Underground Railroad followed man-made transportation routes, many of which are still in use today. I see the Underground Railroad all around Maryland, but it is in a more contemporary form than I am used to seeing it. It’s easy for us to think of safe homes and how to chronicle them. But it’s in the process, the trip, where Maryland can really shine in terms of delivering unique tourist experiences, where people can walk, bicycle and drive along those very same roads and through those very same landscapes.” — Anthony Cohen, Menare Foundation, in a statement The second annual International Underground Railroad Heritage Month will take place in September 2020, and it will honor the sites and people who have played significant roles in the history of the Underground Railroad.

Maryland Heritage Areas Authority (MHAA) staff met with six of the many people around the state that steward and advocate our heritage, not only during the month of September but all year long, for this two-part blog piece.

Here are their responses.

Please see the Maryland Office of Tourism for a more full listing of Underground Railroad resources in Maryland.)

For this first blog post, we asked one question:

Mark Thorne, Historic Site Manager at the Josiah Henson Museum and Park, recommended two Montgomery Parks locations that each explore a different aspect of the Underground Railroad tale. Mark Thorne is a native of Montgomery, Alabama. After its official opening later this year, theJosiah Henson Museum and Park will tell the tale of Reverend Josiah Henson, who fled to freedom in Canada, formed a community there, and helped more than 100 other people escape to freedom as well. The museum and park, which are located inside the limits of Heritage Montgomery, are built on the location of the property where Henson was enslaved by Isaac Riley before fleeing the country via the Underground Railroad.

  1. Harriet Beecher Stowe used Henson’s autobiographical work, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, as source material for her widely circulated novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
  2. ” He returned to the United States on several occasions to liberate enslaved individuals, putting himself, his livelihood, and his own life at danger in order to release those 118 people over a period of several visits.
  3. He provided them with a fresh start in life.
  4. His purchase of this site led to the establishment of a saw mill and the production of furniture, which proved to be so impressive that he was invited to exhibit at the first World’s Fair, where he met the Queen of England, Queen Victoria.” Mr.
  5. Due to COVID-19 issues, the museum is temporarily closed; nevertheless, the grounds, which include the Underground Railroad Experience Trail, are free and available to the public.
  6. The treks have a restricted number of participants, and hikers are required to adhere to social distancing norms.
  7. Families who choose to travel the path on their own can do so by downloading a trail map.
See also:  When Was The Underground Railroad "built"? (Best solution)

The “Hollow Tree and Boundary Stone,” the fifth stop on Woodlawn’s Underground Railroad Experience Trail, is a natural landmark.

Staff from the MHAA took this photograph.

Herschel Johnson was the son of a slave who was born and raised in Dorchester County.

Johnson works as a curator, and he also volunteers at the Harriet Tubman Museum.

Johnson also provides individualized, social-distanced excursions of both the Stanley Institute and other Underground Railroad locations in the surrounding region, as well as of the Stanley Institute itself.

Mr.

The visitor center won a grant from the Michigan Historical and Museum Association for its grand opening celebration in 2017.

when they talk about Harriet Tubman, they make it personal.” Among the other places Mr.

Among the members of the team responsible for developing interpretive exhibits at the Harriet Tubman Visitor Center in Church Creek was Diane Miller, Program Manager for the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.

Miller, would be a worthwhile experience.

You may download it to your phone and listen to it while on the go.

You are not required to exit the vehicle and enter buildings, many of which are now closed.

Miller mentioned as being particularly noteworthy along the Byway was the Adkins Arboretum and its self-guided tour , A Journey Begins: Nature’s Role in the Flight to Freedom.

In addition to discussing how Freedom Seekers moved through the landscape, what types of plants they might have used, and how they might have used the terrain to hide, they did the majority of their talking with quotes from formerly slaves’ narratives and first-person accounts, which was a great help.

  • The grounds of the property are presently open from sunrise to sunset.
  • One of the nine topics of the heritage area is Harriet Tubman and African-American history on the Eastern Shore, which is one of the nine themes of the heritage area.
  • “Harriet Tubman: Journey to Freedom,” a 9-foot-tall, 2,400-pound bronze sculpture, was unveiled in front of the Dorchester County Courthouse on Saturday, September 12, and will be on display until October 9, 2020, according to Ms.
  • The sculpture is seen in the image below.
  • She also encouraged that travelers make plans to see the new Black Lives Matter Mural on Race Street in Cambridge, which is located near the Harriet Tubman Museum, according to Ms.

She went on to say, “The mural is not something that will be here indefinitely.” The paint is meant to fade, but it represents our times and the ways in which our community responds to our times, and it draws attention to the Underground Railroad’s past because of the individuals shown on the mural.

  • Harriet Tubman, Gloria Richardson, Frederick Douglass, and Cambridge Mayor Victoria Jackson-Stanley are among the people depicted in the photographs.
  • After the painting was completed, it was destroyed by someone driving a truck across it and burning tires on the mural.
  • The museum, which is located inside the Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway, has benefited from MHAA grant funds for the creation of the exhibit.
  • Russell added that the museum had planned a full weekend of festivities to celebrate the launch of the new exhibit, but that they would now be postponed until a secure gathering place can be established.
  • People can still visit the museum right now, but only on a restricted basis.
  • Keep an eye out for further information about the forthcoming show.
  • Originally from his family’s oral history traditions, Daniel Hughes worked as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, moving logs down the Susquehanna River and guiding previously enslaved individuals to their freedom.

Anthony Cohen is the founder and executive director of the Menare Foundation, a non-profit organization whose aim is to preserve the heritage of the Underground Railroad in the United States.

Visit the Button Farm Living History Museum, which is a hands-on history center located on Maryland State Park land near Germantown and is one of the Foundation’s current projects, according to Mr Cohen.

Cohen went on to say that the farm grows heritage breed animals and crops that are historically appropriate to the nineteenth century.

We also provide interpretation of the Underground Railroad’s adventures both on-site and off-site.” In the midst of the epidemic, Button Farm was closed to the public, although it has just recently opened to a restricted number of visitors via a reservation system.

Cohen also mentioned another Menare Foundation project, Chesapeake Tours, which provides interpretive services at a number of historic locations around the state of Maryland.

More Sites to Visit

Several Montgomery Parks locations have been recommended by Mark Thorne, Historic Site Manager at the Josiah Henson Museum and Park. Each site explores a different aspect of the Underground Railroad tale and is located in a different part of the city. After opening later this year, the Josiah Henson Museum and Park will tell the tale of Reverend Josiah Henson, a slave who fled to freedom in Canada, where he formed a community and helped more than 100 other slaves escape to freedom. Both the museum and park are located within the confines of Heritage Montgomery, and they were once located on Isaac Riley’s property, where Henson had been enslaved before escaping via the Underground Railroad.

  • Harriet Beecher Stowe utilized Henson’s autobiographical book about his journey as primary material for her widely famous novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin.
  • ” He returned to the United States on several occasions to liberate enslaved individuals, putting himself, his livelihood, and his own life at danger in order to release those 118 people over a period of several years.
  • Their lives were transformed because of him.
  • His purchase of this site led to the establishment of a saw mill and the production of furniture, which proved to be so impressive that he was invited to exhibit at the first World’s Fair, where he met the Queen of England, Queen Victoria.
  • Thorne.
  • Guided hikes of the path are available on Saturdays this autumn for a fee of $6 per individual.
  • Visitors who are interested should register online in advance.

Trail visitors will be guided through the sorts of landscapes that freedom seekers in Maryland would have seen on their trips, with special emphasis placed on natural features such as a hollow tree that were frequently exploited by persons fleeing slavery in Maryland.

Large hollow trees like as this one were frequently utilized as hiding places by runaway fugitives, according to the self-guided tour, while border stones were frequently used as markers for persons seeking to follow the path north.

Dorchester County is now renowned as the birthplace of Harriet Tubman, who escaped from slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and later saved around 70 other people.

The Stanley Institute, a one-room African American school that was created shortly after the Civil War, is where Mr.

Mr.

Many African American Heritage Preservation Program Grants have been awarded to the Stanley Institute over the years.

Johnson.

“The Harriet Tubman Museum on Race Street was originally established because some of Harriet Tubman’s relatives wanted to share the history as early as the 1990s – that’s when they acquired the building – and there you can get a more personal history of Harriet Tubman because the docents there, when they’re open again.

  • Diane Miller, Program Manager for the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom, was a member of the team that worked on the development of interpretive exhibits at the Harriet Tubman Visitor Center in Church Creek, North Carolina.
  • Miller, would be a good idea for visitors.
  • On your phone, you may download the song and listen to it later.
  • The need to exit the vehicle and enter buildings, many of which are now closed, is not required.
  • Miller mentioned the Adkins Arboretum, which offers a self-guided tour titled “A Journey Begins: Nature’s Role in the Flight to Freedom,” as one special sight along the Byway that should not be missed.
  • In addition to discussing how Freedom Seekers travelled across the area, what sorts of flora they may have utilized, and how they might have exploited the terrain to conceal, they did the most of their talking with excerpts from previously slaves’ narratives and first-person recollections.
  • It is presently possible to visit the site’s grounds from sunrise to sunset.
  • In addition to the nine themes that make up the historical area, one of them is Harriet Tubman and African-American history on the Eastern Shore.

Gilberto-Brady suggested that visitors take a look at a new temporary sculpture installation, a 9-foot-tall, 2,400-pound bronze sculpture entitled “Harriet Tubman: Journey to Freedom,” which was unveiled on Saturday, September 12, in front of the Dorchester County Courthouse and will be on display until October 9, 2020.

“This amazing sculpture, created by internationally renowned artist Wesley Wofford, is touring the United States this year, and we are thrilled to be able to support this project with a Heritage Area mini-grant to theAlpha Genesis Community Development Corporation, the organization that coordinated the arrangements for the sculpture’s stop in Cambridge.” This image was provided by Wesley Wofford and the Heart of Chesapeake Country Heritage Area.

  1. She also encouraged that travelers make a point of seeing the new Black Lives Matter Mural on Race Street in Cambridge, which is located near the Harriet Tubman Museum.
  2. The paint is supposed to fade, but it represents our times and the ways in which our community responds to our times, and it draws attention to the Underground Railroad’s past because of the people shown in the painting.
  3. Harriet Tubman, Gloria Richardson, Frederick Douglass, and Cambridge Mayor Victoria Jackson-Stanley are among the figures depicted in the photographs.
  4. Immediately following the completion of the painting, someone set fire to it with their truck, igniting the rubber on the artwork.

For the past several months, Bruce Russell, Board President of the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum, has been in charge of the organization’s project to design and install a new exhibit that will be devoted to the history of the Underground Railroad in the Upper Chesapeake Bay and the broader watershed.

  • Mr.
  • It will be extensively publicized once a date for the grand opening has been determined.
  • It is necessary to maintain social distance and to wear masks.
  • This sculpture by Anyta Thomasis one of the works of art commissioned for the new show at the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum.
  • Thanks to the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum for the use of their photograph.
  • When the COVID-19 epidemic hit, the Foundation got financing from MHAA to assist with emergency operations.
  • Cohen.
  • Cohen went on to say that the farm breeds heritage breed animals as well as crops that are historically appropriate to the nineteenth century.
  • In the midst of the epidemic, Button Farm was closed to the public, although it has just recently opened to a restricted number of visitors through a reservation system.
  • Cohen, who said that it provides explanation at a number of historic locations around Maryland.

Retracing Harriet Tubman’s Steps on Maryland’s Eastern Shore

The use of an audio guide is recommended; you can obtain one from the Byway’s official website or obtain a free smartphone app by searching for Harriet Tubman Byway in the Apple App Store or Google Play. While listening, you will be transported to another world, as the music and the passionately delivered tale will touch your whole soul. All of the places are free to visit, however if you feel moved to make a gift, there are donation boxes accessible at each location.

Must-see stops along the byway

The use of an audio guide is recommended; you may download one from the Byway’s official website or download a free smartphone app by searching for Harriet Tubman Byway in the Apple App Store or Google Play. It takes the experience to a whole other level while you are listening to it since the music and the passionately delivered tale hit your spirit. All of the sites are free to visit, however if you feel moved to donate, there are contribution boxes accessible.

Harriet Tubman’s Path to Freedom (Published 2017)

After a three-day journey over the Eastern Shore, which included Tubman’s birthplace and the terrain she crossed with escaped slaves in tow, I arrived in Philadelphia, having traveled from Dorchester County through Delaware. My visit coincided with the resurgence of interest in Tubman in the state: The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, a $21 million project in Church Creek that commemorates Tubman’s journey from slave to Underground Railroad “conductor” and, later in life, Civil War scout, spy, and nurse, will open to the public on March 11.

  1. As part of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, which spans 125 miles and includes 36 historically significant locations on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, the facility will be located on 17 acres of land on the Eastern Shore.
  2. Initially, the region served as a gateway through which slave traders transported them from Africa to the colonies, and later as an important network of paths and waterways that served as a part of the Underground Railroad.
  3. “However, few returned to the land of their enslavers, risking capture and re-enslavement, and even lynching, in order to assist others in their own struggle for freedom,” says Ms.
  4. Tubman was one of the select few.
See also:  Underground Railroad How It Started? (Best solution)
In the Mire

Although the precise year of Harriet Tubman’s birth is uncertain, historians generally believe that she was born Araminta Ross in 1822 to Benjamin and Harriet (Rit) Greene Ross. When she married in 1844, she took on her mother’s first name, which she changed to Harriet Tubman. A native of Peters Neck, she was raised on a property owned by Anthony Thompson, a medical doctor and lumber tycoon, before moving to Bucktown with her family when she was a child. My first stop was the Bucktown farm of Edward Brodess, Dr.

It was a 20-minute drive from my hotel.

I came to numerous interesting places along the road, including:

3. Stanley Institute

My journey also took me to the Stanley Institute, a one-room 19th-century schoolhouse that once served as a chapel, where I sat at one of its wooden desks for a brief period of time. It is one of the state’s oldest schools, and it is run entirely by members of the black community. Tubman herself never received a formal education in reading or writing. After being rented out to work by local families since she was 5 years old, she has performed a variety of tasks include checking muskrat traps in streams and rivers, serving as a nursemaid to a planter’s child, and working in the fields of wood farms.

4. Bucktown Village Store

The Bucktown Village Store, which dates back to Tubman’s time but has been refurbished, is still in operation. This is where Tubman first shown symptoms of disobedience as a teenager, and it was here that she suffered the consequences of her actions.

First Flight

Tubman had come to Bucktown Village Store one day with the chef of a slave owner, and they had crossed paths with an overseer who was having a disagreement with his slave. According to reports, the slave had fled the property without authorization. When the overseer ordered Tubman to assist him in restraining the guy, she refused, resulting in the slave breaking free. The overseer then took a two-pound weight off the counter, hurled it at the running slave, and instead hit Tubman in the back of the head.

She married John Tubman, a free black man, over a decade later, despite the fact that she remained in slavery to the Brodess family at the time.

They subsequently returned, fearing they would face punishment.

The Return

Tubman left the farm shortly after returning, guided through the night by the North Star and the well-worn trails of the Underground Railroad up into Pennsylvania, where slavery was prohibited at the time. She would later write in her book about her experience of being free, which she described as “bittersweet.” She was free and lonely in Philadelphia, where she worked odd jobs to supplement her income. Tubman began planning her return to her hometown in order to bring her family with her: “I was free, and dey should be free as well.

  1. Tubman’s niece, Kessiah, was the subject of the sale.
  2. As soon as he received the highest price for Kessiah and their children, he transported them to a local safe house, where they were met by Tubman, who conducted them on a tour of Philadelphia until they reached the city’s harbor.
  3. Her visits to Maryland’s Eastern Shore numbered a dozen during the following decade, during which she saved the lives of around 70 family members and friends.
  4. The author of the Tubman biography, Ms.

She used bribes to get others to do what she wanted. Rivers snaked northward, and she followed their course. As she made her way north, she followed the stars and other natural phenomena.”

Due North

After crossing the border into Caroline County and entering Poplar Neck as the sun began to drop in Dorchester County, I continued northward. In addition to offering breathtaking vistas of the Choptank River, the region is rich in historical significance. Mount Pleasant Cemetery is located here, as is Tubman’s former home, where she escaped slavery in 1849 and returned later, in 1857, to free her parents from their then-owner, Dr. Thompson, who controlled 2,200 acres of land in this region.

Safe Houses of Worship

Fugitive slaves fleeing to Pennsylvania made their way through Maryland’s Eastern Seaboard, passing through Caroline County and into Kent County, Delaware, before arriving in Philadelphia. In Dover, where they would regularly get assistance from free black and Quaker abolitionists, they would frequently make a pit stop. The Star Hill A.M.E. Church, which now serves as a small museum, was built on the site by the black community later on.

The Stationmaster

On my final day on the Eastern Shore, I was inspired by the Quakers’ dedication to the Underground Railroad to pay a visit to the Friends Meeting House in Wilmington, Del., which houses the burial site of Thomas Garrett, a Quaker abolitionist who was a close friend of Harriet Tubman and one of the most important “stationmasters” on the Underground Railroad during the abolitionist movement. Garrett supported over 2,700 enslaved persons on their path to liberation over the course of four decades, offering them with food, housing, money, and contacts to other abolitionists along the way.

In a letter sent in 1868, Garrett expressed his admiration for Tubman, saying, “For the truth be told, I never met with any individual, of whatever hue, who had greater trust in the voice of God.” Tubman had sent a letter to Ednah Dow Cheney, a philanthropist and suffragist, a decade earlier, in which she detailed her religious beliefs.

The Underground Railroad Route

Because of the Quakers’ dedication to the Underground Railroad, I decided to stop at the Friends Meeting House in Wilmington, Del., where I learned that Thomas Garrett, a Quaker abolitionist and close friend of Harriet Tubman, was buried. Garrett was one of the Underground Railroad’s most important “stationmasters,” and the Friends Meeting House is where he was laid to rest. Garrett supported around 2,700 enslaved persons on their road to liberation over the course of more than four decades. He provided them with food, housing, financial assistance, and contacts to other abolitionists.

  • Alabama
  • sArkansas
  • sDelaware
  • sFlorida
  • sGeorgia
  • sKentucky
  • sLouisiana
  • sMaryland
  • sMississippi
  • sMissouri
  • sMontana This state does not display on the map since it is not included in the list. Make use of a wall map of the United States to instruct children on where Montana is located.) North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia are among the states represented.

Explain to pupils that enslaved individuals did not have access to maps, compasses, or GPS systems throughout their time in slavery. The majority of enslaved individuals were never permitted to get an education, and as a result, they were unable to read or write. Consider the following question: How do you suppose enslaved people knew they were heading in the correct direction? Students should be informed that enslaved individuals resorted to guides on the Underground Railroad, as well as memory, visuals, and spoken communication to survive.

  • Talk about the difficulties you’ve encountered on your path.
  • Instruct pupils to examine the map and make note of any physical characteristics of the region that made the voyage challenging.
  • In order to demonstrate proper shading techniques, students should go to Alabama, then northeast via Maine and into Canada to see how the Applachian Mountains are shaded.
  • Ask:Can you think of anything else that made the travel difficult?
  • In the winter, being cold and outdoors
  • Not having enough food
  • Being exhausted yet unable to relax
  • Having to swim or traverse bodies of water
  • Having to travel great distances
  • Evading or avoiding people or animals

3. Ask pupils to identify the route they would have chosen if they were in their shoes. Students should be divided into small groups. Ask each group to look at the map and choose the route they would have gone to freedom if they had been able to do so. Students should choose their selections based on the states, rivers, and mountain ranges that they would have to cover on their journey. Ask each group to describe the path they would have followed and why they would have done so.

Informal Assessment

Students should discuss what they believe to be the most difficult obstacles to fleeing enslaved people, such as distance, weather, mountains, wildlife, bodies of water, or densely inhabited places, among other things. Inquire as to how their chosen method might have assisted enslaved individuals in avoiding the difficulties they were faced with.

Learning Objectives

As a class, ask students to discuss the obstacles they believe they will face in escaping enslaved people. These obstacles may include distance, weather, mountains, wildlife, bodies of water, or populous places, among others. To find out how their selected way would have helped enslaved people escape the difficulties, ask them to describe how it did so.

  • The student will be able to identify slave states and free states during the time period when the Underground Railroad was active
  • Describe the difficulties encountered throughout the voyage
  • Indicate the path they would have followed, and explain their reasons.

Teaching Approach

  • Learn how to distinguish between slave and free states during the time of the Underground Railroad, and how to describe the difficulties they faced along the way. Describe the path they would have followed and explain their reasons.

What You’ll Need

  • The student will be able to identify slave states and free states during the time period when the Underground Railroad was active
  • Describe the difficulties encountered throughout the voyage
  • Indicate the path they would have followed, and explain their reasons
  • And

Required Technology

  • Internet access is optional
  • Technological setup includes one computer per classroom and a projector.

Physical Space

With the exception of promotional graphics, which normally link to another page that carries the media credit, all audio, artwork, photos, and videos are attributed beneath the media asset they are associated with. In the case of media, the Rights Holder is the individual or group that gets credited.

Writer

Naomi Friedman holds a Master’s degree in political science.

Editor

Professor of Political Science, Naomi Friedman, M.A.

Educator Reviewer

Jessica Wallace-Weaver is a certified educational consultant.

Sources

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See also:  What Years Did The Underground Railroad Take Place? (Professionals recommend)

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International Underground Railroad Month – Underground Railroad (U.S. National Park Service)

This year, the New Philadelphia Association will be commemorating the 202nd anniversary of the day Free Frank McWorter purchased his own freedom on September 13, 1819, with great pride. Free Frank Freedom Day will take place on September 13, 2021, on the 13th of September. At 2 p.m., the festivities will kick off at the historic New Philadelphia town site on County Highway 2, which is located northeast of Barry, Illinois. The presentation will begin with a welcoming message from Phil Bradshaw, president of the National Parks Association, followed by statements from relatives of the McWorter family, community leaders, and historians.

  • Later in the day, the program will go to the adjacent town of Barry, where Brigadier General Donald L.
  • at the Historic Barry Baptist Church, located at 900 Main Street in the town of Barry.
  • Seating is limited, so arrive early to avoid disappointment.
  • Free Frank made history in 1836 when he became the first African-American to plan and legally register a town in the United States.
  • New Philadelphia grew up as a multicultural and multiracial neighborhood.

Underground Railroad Bibliography

202 years ago, on September 13, 1819, Free Frank McWorter purchased his own freedom, and the New Philadelphia Association will be there to commemorate the occasion. Monday, September 13, 2021, will be observed as Free Frank Freedom Day. Starting at 2 PM, the activities will take place at the historic New Philadelphia town site, located northeast of Barry on County Highway 2 (northeast of Barry, Illinois). The ceremony will begin with a welcoming message from Phil Bradshaw, president of the National Parks Association, followed by speeches from descendants of the McWorter family, community leaders, and historians, among other things.

  1. Later in the day, the program will go to the adjacent town of Barry, where Brigadier General Donald L.
  2. at the Historic Barry Baptist Church, located at 900 Main Street in the heart of downtown.
  3. Come early since seating is limited.
  4. When Free Frank platted and officially registered his town in 1836, he made history as the first African-American to do so in the United States.
  5. This ethnically diversified community sprang up in New Philadelphia.

A National Historic Landmark, New Philadelphia is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is part of the National Park Service’s Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Program. It is also included on the National Register of Historic Places.

Indiana Resources

Ronald Baker is the author of this work. Homeless, friendless, and penniless: The WPA conducts interviews with former slaves who are now residents of Indiana. Indiana University Press, Bloomington, Indiana, 2000. Maxine Brown is the author of this work. A Study of Free Blacks’ Participation in the Underground Railroad Activities of Central Indiana The DNR-DHPA published a report in 2001 titled COL. WILLIAM Cockrum’s obituary. The Anti-Slavery League’s investigation into the Underground Railroad’s history was published in the book The History of the Underground Railroad.

  1. Levi Coffin is a fictional character created by author Levi Coffin.
  2. Mark Coomer is the author of this work.
  3. Indianapolis.
  4. The DNR-DHPA published a report in 2001 titled Xenia, you have a cord.
  5. The Indiana Historical Society published this book in 1993.
  6. Bury me in a Free Land: The Abolitionist Movement in Indiana, 1816-1865, is a book on the Abolitionist Movement in Indiana, 1816-1865.
  7. Slavery and the Law, edited by Paul Finkelman, is available online.

Madison, WI: Madison House Publishers, 1997.

Associated with the Underground Railroad in the Indianapolis Area: Interpretive Narratives The DNR-DHPA published a report in 2001 titled Furlong, Patrick J., ed., The South Bed Fugitive Slave Case (The South Bed Fugitive Slave Case).

Goodall, Hurley C.

Goodall Publishing Company, Muncie, Indiana, 2000.

Underground Railroad: The Invisible Road to Freedom Through Indiana is a project of the Works Progress Administration’s Writers Project.

The Anti-Slavery Movement in Henry County, Indiana: A Study of the Local Abolitionists is a study of the anti-slavery movement in Henry County, Indiana.

Marlene Lu is the author of this article.

The DNR-DHPA published a report in 2001 titled George Olshausen is a writer who lives in New York City.

Pamela R.

Originally published by McFarlandCompany, Inc.

The Underground Railroad and the Antislavery Movement in Fort Wayne and Allen County, Indiana, by Angela M.

Fort Wayne, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2000.

The Indiana Negro Registers, 1852-1865 are available online.

Emma Lou Thornbrough’s Indiana in the Civil War Era 1850-1880 is available online.

Emma Lou Thornbrough is a fictional character created by author Emma Lou Thornbrough. Before 1900, there were a lot of black people in Indiana. The Indiana Historical Bureau published this book in 1957 in Indianapolis.

Websites

In their entirety, the original slave tales docsouth.unc.edu This project, Documenting the American South (DAS), brings together historical, literary, and cultural materials on the Southern United States from the colonial period through the early decades of the twentieth century. Throughout the nineteenth, twentieth, and early twentieth centuries, DAS chronicles the individual and communal stories of African Americans who fought for freedom and human rights in the United States. Slave Narratives: Excerpts from the Book It includes passages from early European voyage accounts to Africa, as well as passages from slave narratives.

  1. Those who survived slavery share their experiences in the documentary Remembering Slavery.
  2. Many of the interviews were recorded on paper, but other interviewers were able to capture the voices of the former slaves on tape.
  3. Interactive for PBS Online entitled “Africans in America: America’s Journey through Slavery.” The history of slavery in America is given in four sections, each of which includes a historical narrative, a resource book, and a teacher’s guide.
  4. Provide a history of the home, an overview of Coffin’s work, as well as a comprehensive connections page.
  5. With a range of presentation techniques and depths of coverage, the site is unique in its capacity to make the experience of the Underground Railroad accessible to students in elementary, middle, and early high school.
  6. Students in the upper grades can study “Routes to Freedom,” which includes a map that can be magnified, and “Timeline,” which provides accurate facts.
  7. In the “For Kids” section, young detectives may investigate some of the greatest and most imaginative hiding places utilized by tourists.
  8. The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting freedom from slavery and other forms of oppression.
  9. Among the resources available are an introduction, a map of the routes, a list of railroad sites organized by state, and a links page with a comprehensive bibliography.
  10. These pages provide a brief history of the home, farm, or church that is being featured, as well as a photo and information about whether or not the property is accessible to the general public.

It is concerned with more than simply the history of the Underground Railroad. Frederick Douglass was an American civil rights leader. Douglass, his life, and his mansion are all covered in detail. His abolitionist activities are described in detail.

Youth

Patricia Beatty is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom. Who is it that is bringing the cannons? Originally published in 1992 by Morrow Junior Books in New York. Judith Bentley is a writer and editor who lives in New York City. The Underground Railroad was a collaboration between Thomas Garrett and William Still, who were friends for years. Cobblehill Books published the book in 1997 in New York. Raymond Bial is a writer who lives in New York City. Life in the Slave Quarters is a testament to the strength of these arms.

  • Raymond Bial is a writer who lives in New York City.
  • Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 1997.
  • Allen Jay and the Underground Railroad are two of the most well-known characters in American history.
  • Sylviane A.
  • Growing up in Slavery is a difficult experience.
  • Brookfield, Conn.: Brookfield Publishing Company, 2001.
  • I’m going to make something out of this Nettle.

Fradin, Dennis Brindell, and others.

Peter Still’s Biography is a fictionalized account of his life.

New York: Harper Collins Publishers, 2001.

Get aboard the bus.

Harriet Jacob is a fictional character created by author Harriet Jacob.

1987.

A Slave Family is defined as follows: Crabtree Publishing Company, New York, 2002.

True North: A Novel of the UGRR is a novel about the Underground Railroad of the Great Plains.

Frank Latham is a writer who lives in New York City.

Franklin Watts, Inc.

Ellen Levine is a writer who lives in New York City.

Scholastic Publishing Company, 1988.

The Herald Press, Scottdale, Pennsylvania, published this book in 1975.

Harriet Tubman: The Runaway Slave is a biography of Harriet Tubman.

Meyer, Linda D., et al.

The Parenting Press published this book in 1988.

The Last Days of Slavery, written by Frederick Douglass.

“The Drinking Gourd,” says Monjo in his book F.N.

Kay Moore is the author of this work.

Scholastic Publishing Company, 1994.

Freedom River is a river in the United States of America.

Anita Riggio is a writer living in New York City.

Boyds Mills Press published this book in 1997.

Athenaeum Books for Young Readers published the book in 1997 in New York.

Minty: A Story of Young Harriet Tubman is a fictionalized account of Harriet Tubman’s childhood.

R.

The Underground Railroad: A Historical Account The Children’s Press of Chicago published this book in 1981.

North to Liberty: The Story of the Underground Railroad is a book on the Underground Railroad.

The World Book Encyclopedia is a collection of books published by the World Book Company.

“The Underground Railroad,” as it is known. The World Book Encyclopedia was published in 1997. Sharon Dennis Wyeth is the author of this work. Freedom’s Wings: A Diary of Corey’s Adventures. Scholastic, Inc. (New York, 2001) published the book.

For Teachers

Linda Jacobs and Altman, Linda Slavery and Abolition in the History of the United States Enslow Publishers, Berkeley Heights, New Jersey, 1999. Judith Bentley is a writer and editor who lives in New York City. Harriet Tubman is a historical figure. Franklin Watts Publishing Company, New York, 1990. Charles Charlers and Blockson “The Underground Railroad,” as they say in the United States. National Geographic magazine published an article in July 1984 titled Budda Records is a record label based in New York City.

  1. Buddha Records released the album in 2001.
  2. Fiery Vision: The Life and Death of John Brown is a book about the life and death of John Brown.
  3. Dennis B.
  4. Clarion Books, New York, published in 2000.
  5. North Star to Freedom: The Story of the Underground Railroad is a book on the Underground Railroad.
  6. It is a partnership between Kim and Reggie Harris.
  7. Ascension Records released the album in 1984 in Philadelphia.

The Underground Railroad was a dangerous place to be.

Patricia McKissack and Frederick McKissack are the authors of this work.

Scholastic Books, New York, 1996.

Roots.

Stowe, Harriet Beecher.

Video

According to ABC News. Taking a Journey to Africa: A Return to the Slave Pens of Ghana Films for the Humanities and Sciences, a division of Films for the Humanities and Sciences, was founded in 2002 in Princeton, New Jersey. Orlando Bagwell is a fictional character created by the author of the novel The Hunger Games. Roots of Resistance: A Story of the Underground Railroad is a book on the Underground Railroad. Raja Productions is a production company based in India. In 1990, a film on the American experience was made.

Africans in America: America’s Journey Into the Heart of Africa Boston, Massachusetts, 1998.

Roots.

Susan Michaels is the author of this work.

Triage, Inc.

A E Network/The History Channel published a book in New York in 1999. Scott Paddor is the author of this work. Frederick Douglass was an American civil rights leader. Greystone Communications, Inc. is a communications company based in the United States. A E Home Video, New York, New York, 1999.

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