What States Were Part Of The Underground Railroad? (Perfect answer)

Most of the enslaved people helped by the Underground Railroad escaped border states such as Kentucky, Virginia and Maryland. In the deep South, the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 made capturing escaped enslaved people a lucrative business, and there were fewer hiding places for them.

What states did the Underground Railroad go through?

  • The First Transcontinental Railroad was built between 1863 and 1869 and passed through the states California, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, and Nebraska. 0 CommentsAdd a Comment.

What were the locations of the Underground Railroad?

Locations

  • Bethel AME Church. 414 West Vermont Avenue.
  • Bethel AME Zion Church. 119 North Tenth Street.
  • Dr. Nathan Thomas House.
  • Dr. Richard Eells House.
  • Friends Meeting House.
  • Harriet Beecher Stowe House.
  • Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged, Residence & Thompson AME Zion Church.
  • Hubbard House Underground Railroad Museum.

What cities played a major role in the Underground Railroad?

The cities of Buffalo, Rochester and their surrounding areas helped to play a leading role in the Underground Railroad movement.

Was Ohio part of the Underground Railroad?

Although there were Underground Railroad networks throughout the country, even in the South, Ohio had the most active network of any other state with around 3000 miles of routes used by escaping runaways. First Ohio was bordered by 2 slave states: Virginia and Kentucky.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

Was the Underground Railroad in Illinois?

After the Civil War, slaves heading north toward freedom began trickling into Illinois. This meant slaves had to travel through Illinois discretely, usually under the cover of darkness. They would go from safe house to safe house—a path to freedom that came to be known as the Underground Railroad.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Tennessee?

The Underground Railroad was the name given clandestine operations by which many slaves before and during the Civil War fled to northern states and a measure of freedom. Some lines of that railroad ran through East Tennessee, even though slavery was much less prevalent here than in many other parts of the South.

Where did the Underground Railroad have safe houses?

In the years leading up to the Civil War, the black abolitionist William Still offered shelter to hundreds of freedom seekers as they journeyed northward.

Was Cleveland part of the Underground Railroad?

Following the opening of the Ohio & Erie Canal, Cleveland became a major player in the Underground Railroad. The city was codenamed “Hope,” and it was an important destination for escaped slaves on their way to Canada. The oldest parts of this structure date back to 1798, making it the oldest surviving tavern in Ohio.

Was there ever a real Underground Railroad?

Nope! Despite its name, the Underground Railroad wasn’t a railroad in the way Amtrak or commuter rail is. It wasn’t even a real railroad. The Underground Railroad of history was simply a loose network of safe houses and top secret routes to states where slavery was banned.

Was the Underground Railroad illegal?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. Involvement with the Underground Railroad was not only dangerous, but it was also illegal. So, to help protect themselves and their mission secret codes were created.

What state ended slavery first?

In 1780, Pennsylvania became the first state to abolish slavery when it adopted a statute that provided for the freedom of every slave born after its enactment (once that individual reached the age of majority). Massachusetts was the first to abolish slavery outright, doing so by judicial decree in 1783.

How many Underground Railroad routes were there?

There were four main routes that the enslaved could follow: North along the Mississippi and Ohio rivers to the northern United States and Canada; South to Florida and refuge with the Seminole Indians and to the Bahamas; West along the Gulf of Mexico and into Mexico; and East along the seaboard into Canada.

The Underground Railroad Route

Students will learn how to distinguish between slave states and free states during the time of the Underground Railroad, as well as the difficulties of escaping and choosing the path they would have chosen. Geography, Human Geography, and Physical Geography are the subjects covered. Students should be able to distinguish between slave and free states throughout the time of the Underground Railroad. Each pupil should be given a copy of the map titled “Routes to Freedom.” Inform pupils that the Underground Railroad aided enslaved individuals as they traveled from the South to the North during the American Civil War.

Afterwards, instruct pupils to locate each slave state on the map as you pronounce its name:

  • Alabama
  • sArkansas
  • sDelaware
  • sFlorida
  • sGeorgia
  • sKentucky
  • sLouisiana
  • sMaryland
  • sMississippi
  • sMissouri
  • sMontana This state does not display on the map since it is not included in the list. Make use of a wall map of the United States to instruct children on where Montana is located.) North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia are among the states represented.

Alabama;sArkansas;sDelaware;sFlorida;sGeorgia;sKentucky;sLouisiana;sMaryland;sMississippi;sMissouri;sMontana The fact that this state does not appear on the map is significant. Instruct pupils to locate Montana on a wall map of the United States.) North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia are among the states represented by this group.

  • In the winter, being cold and outdoors
  • Not having enough food
  • Being exhausted yet unable to relax
  • Having to swim or traverse bodies of water
  • Having to travel great distances
  • Evading or avoiding people or animals

3. Ask pupils to identify the route they would have chosen if they were in their shoes. Students should be divided into small groups. Ask each group to look at the map and choose the route they would have gone to freedom if they had been able to do so. Students should choose their selections based on the states, rivers, and mountain ranges that they would have to cover on their journey. Ask each group to describe the path they would have followed and why they would have done so.

Informal Assessment

Students should discuss what they believe to be the most difficult obstacles to fleeing enslaved people, such as distance, weather, mountains, wildlife, bodies of water, or densely inhabited places, among other things. Inquire as to how their chosen method might have assisted enslaved individuals in avoiding the difficulties they were faced with.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • The student will be able to identify slave states and free states during the time period when the Underground Railroad was active
  • Describe the difficulties encountered throughout the voyage
  • Indicate the path they would have followed, and explain their reasons.

Teaching Approach

  • Common Core Standard 1: How to interpret and share information via the use of maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technology, and spatial thinking
  • Standard 17: How to use geography to understand and interpret the past.

What You’ll Need

  • Highlighters, paper, pencils, and pens, as well as a wall map of the United States

Required Technology

  • Internet access is optional
  • Technological setup includes one computer per classroom and a projector.

Physical Space

• Internet access is optional; • Technology setup includes one computer per classroom and a projector

Writer

Naomi Friedman holds a Master’s degree in political science.

Editor

Christina Riska Simmons is a model and actress.

Educator Reviewer

Jessica Wallace-Weaver is a certified educational consultant.

Sources

  • Based on the National Geographic Xpeditions lesson “Finding Your Way: The Underground Railroad,” this activity was created. Permissions Granted to Users Users’ permissions are detailed in our Terms of Service, which you can see by clicking here. Alternatively, if you have any issues regarding how to reference something from our website in your project or classroom presentation, please speak with your instructor. They will be the most knowledgeable about the selected format. When you contact them, you will need to provide them with the page title, URL, and the date on which you visited the item.

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Places of the Underground Railroad (U.S. National Park Service)

A map of the United States depicting the many paths that freedom seekers might follow in order to attain freedom. NPS provided the image. When enslaved African Americans attempted to obtain their escape via the use of an underground railroad network of routes, safehouses, and resources distributed across the country, they were referred to as “fugitives from justice.” This attempt was frequently spontaneous, with enslaved persons setting off on their quest to liberation on their own initiative.

During the 1820s and 1830s, the United States experienced a surge in the number of people who sought independence from oppression.

In certain instances, the choice to aid a freedom seeking may have been a result of a spur of the moment decision. When the Underground Railroad was purposeful and planned, as it was following the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, it was a successful strategy.

Origins of the Underground Railroad

Enslaved people have long sought liberation, dating back to the earliest days of the institution of slavery. Colonial North America – which included Canada and the northern states of the United States – was heavily involved in the slave trade during the nineteenth century. Newly enslaved Africans frequently fled in groups with the intention of establishing new communities in isolated locations. Slavery was particularly widespread in the northern states, making escape extremely difficult. Before the mid-nineteenth century, Spanish Florida and Mexico were the most popular escape destinations for those fleeing bondage.

  • The Clemens’ residence is owned by James and Sarah Clemens.
  • Following the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850 by Congress, Canada became a shelter for many people who were hoping to gain their freedom.
  • Those living in free Black communities in the North were devastated by this.
  • However, as a result of these seizures and kidnappings, a large number of individuals were persuaded to provide assistance as part of the Underground Railroad.
  • Formerly enslaved men and women also played an important part in assisting freedom seekers, such as the Clemens family, in their quest for freedom.
  • In addition to establishing a school and a cemetery, they served as a station on the Underground Railroad from their residence.
  • Bethel AME Church is a congregation of African-Americans.
See also:  What Is The Routes Slaves Traveled Through The Underground Railroad? (TOP 5 Tips)

The Role of Women in the Underground Railroad

Since the beginning of slavery, enslaved people have been striving for their liberation. In the slave trade, colonial North America — which included Canada and northern states in the United States – played a major role. In order to create new settlements in isolated places, newly enslaved Africans frequently formed groups and fled. Also prevalent in the northern states, slavery made emigrating more difficult. Spanish Florida and Mexico were popular escape destinations for many bondage evaders until the mid-1800s.

  • The Clemens’ residence is owned by James and Sarah.
  • This measure made it easy and profitable to pay slave catchers to track out and apprehend political dissidents and political prisoners.
  • In many cases, slave hunters abducted African Americans who were in fact lawful citizens of the United States.
  • Individuals, couples, and even families were among those who took part in the Underground Railroad network.
  • The Greenville settlement in western Ohio was founded by James and Sophia Clemens.

A handful of freedom seekers made their way to Greenville as a last destination. Bethel AME Church is a congregation of African-American men and women. Smallbones’s photograph is in the public domain.

Legacy of the Underground Railroad

Locations related with the Underground Railroad may be found all throughout the United States, and a number of national preservation projects are devoted to recording these historical places of significance. In the case of the National Park Service’sNetwork to Freedomprogram, for example, the program includes locations that may be proven to have a link to the Underground Railroad. By working in conjunction with government agencies, people, and organizations to recognize, preserve, and promote the history of resistance to enslavement through escape and flight, the Network to Freedom hopes to bring attention to this important part of human history.

  1. The Barney L.
  2. The public domain is a term used to describe a piece of property that is owned by the public.
  3. Identification, evaluation, and protection of America’s historic and archeological resources are the goals of this National Park Service initiative, which brings together public and private efforts.
  4. This is true of places such as theBarney L.
  5. With the help of the Underground Railroad, Barney was able to escape from his bondage.
  6. Barney finally settled in Denver, where he made a name for himself as a successful businessman.
  7. Barney was also an outspoken fighter for African-American civil rights, and he played a crucial part in Colorado’s admittance to the Union as a free state.
  8. Ford Building contribute to the telling of the tale of the Underground Railroad and its participants – both free and enslaved – in the United States.

Underground Railroad

It is possible to visit sites related with the Underground Railroad all throughout the United States, and a number of national preservation initiatives are tasked with recording these locations. Among the sites included in the National Park Service’s Network to Freedomprogram are those that can be linked to the Underground Railroad with reasonable certainty. By working in partnership with government agencies, individuals, and organizations to recognize, preserve, and promote the history of resistance to enslavement through escape and flight, the Network to Freedom hopes to bring attention to this important part of human history.

  • A building named after Barney L.
  • You can use this in your own personal projects, but please do not use it in commercial endeavors.
  • Identification, evaluation, and protection of America’s historic and archeological treasures are the goals of this National Park Service initiative, which brings together public and private organizations.
  • In Denver, Colorado, one such location is theBarney L.
  • With the help of the Underground Railroad, Barney was able to escape his bondage.
  • He finally settled in Denver, where he made a name for himself as a successful entrepreneur.
  • Barney was also an outspoken fighter for African-American civil rights, and he was instrumental in Colorado’s admittance to the Union as a free state.
  • Ford Building aid in the telling of the tale of the Underground Railroad and its participants — both free and enslaved – by providing a visual representation of their experiences.

Members of the public can assist in the recognition and preservation of locations, structures, and landscapes linked with the Underground Railroad by nominating them to the Network to Freedom or to the National Register, respectively.

Underground Railroad – Ohio History Central

Places related with the Underground Railroad may be found all throughout the United States, and a number of national preservation projects are devoted to recording these historical landmarks. Among the sites included in the National Park Service’s Network to Freedomprogram are those that may be traced back to the Underground Railroad. The Network to Freedom, in conjunction with government agencies, people, and groups, recognizes, protects, and promotes the history of resistance to enslavement achieved via escape and flight.

  • The Barney L.
  • ‘Public Domain’ refers to a work that is freely available to the public.
  • Identification, evaluation, and protection of America’s historic and archeological resources are the goals of this National Park Service initiative, which brings together public and private resources.
  • One such location is theBarney L.
  • With the help of the Underground Railroad, Barney was able to escape from bondage.
  • Barney finally settled in Denver, where he made a name for himself as a successful company owner.
  • Barney was also an outspoken fighter for African-American civil rights, and he played an important part in Colorado’s admittance to the Union as a free state.
  • Ford Building aid in the telling of the tale of the Underground Railroad and its participants – both free and enslaved – by providing a visual representation.

See Also

  1. “The Hippocrene Guide to the Underground Railroad,” by Charles L. Blockson, et al. Hippocrene Books, New York, NY, 1994
  2. Levi Coffin, Hippocrene Books, New York, NY, 1994. Levi Coffin’s recollections of his time as the rumored President of the Underground Railroad. Arno Press, New York, NY, 1968
  3. Dee, Christine, ed., Ohio’s War: The Civil War in Documents, New York, NY, 1968. Ohio: A Four-Volume Reference Library on the History of a Great State (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2007)
  4. Fess, Simeon D., ed. Ohio: A Four-Volume Reference Library on the History of a Great State (Athens: Ohio University Press, 2007). Gara, Larry, and Lewis Publishing Company, 1937
  5. Chicago, IL: Lewis Publishing Company. The Liberty Line: The Legend of the Underground Railroad is a documentary film about the Underground Railroad. Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky Press, 1961
  6. Ann Hagedorn, ed., Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1961. Beyond the River: The Untold Story of the Heroes of the Underground Railroad is a book about the heroes of the Underground Railroad. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 2002
  7. Roseboom, Eugene H. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 2002
  8. The period from 1850 to 1873 is known as the Civil War Era. The Underground Railroad: From Slavery to Freedom (Columbus, OH: Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society, 1944)
  9. Siebert, Wibur H. “The Underground Railroad: From Slavery to Freedom.” RussellRussell, New York, 1898
  10. Siebert, Wilbur Henry, New York, 1898. Ohio was a stop on the Underground Railroad. Lesick, Lawrence Thomas
  11. Arthur W. McGraw, 1993
  12. McGraw, Arthur W. The Lane Rebels: Evangelicalism and Antislavery in Antebellum America is a book about the Lane family who were antislavery activists in the antebellum era. Roland M. Baumann’s book, The Scarecrow Press, was published in 1980 in Metuchen, NJ. The Rescue of the Oberlin-Wellington Train in 1858: A Reappraisal Oberlin, OH: Oberlin College Press, 2003
  13. Levi Coffin and William Still, editors. Fleeing for Freedom: Stories of the Underground Railroad is a collection of short stories about people fleeing for freedom. Ivan R. Dee Publishers, Chicago, Illinois, 2004.

Underground Railroad

“The Hippocrene Guide to the Underground Railroad,” by Charles L. Blockson, is available online at Amazon.com. Hippocrene Books, New York, NY, 1994; Levi Coffin, Hippocrene Books, 1994. Levi Coffin’s recollections of his time as the alleged President of the Underground Railroad are included. OHIO’S WAR: THE CIVIL WAR IN DOCUMENTS (New York, NY: Arno Press, 1968); Christine Dee (ed.) Ohio: A Four-Volume Reference Library on the History of a Great State, edited by Simeon D. Fess, Athens: Ohio University Press, 2007.

  1. The Underground Railroad’s Liberty Line is a legendary tale.
  2. Lexington, KY: University of Kentucky Press “Beyond the River” is a nonfiction book that tells the story of the Underground Railroad heroes who went undetected for decades.
  3. Between 1850 until 1873, the United States was in the Civil War.
  4. The Underground Railroad: From Slavery to Freedom.
  5. 1898; Wilbur Henry Siebert, New York: RussellRussell; RussellRussell, 1898; In Ohio, there was an Underground Railroad.
  6. McGraw, 1993.
  7. It was published by Scarecrow Press in Metuchen, New Jersey, and it was written by Roland M.
  8. a reappraisal of the 1858 Oberlin-Wellington rescue Cooper, Levi, and William Still (eds.) published Oberlin College Press in 2003 in Oberlin, Ohio.

Tales of Freedom on the Underground Railroad is a collection of stories about people fleeing for their lives to find freedom. Ivan R. Dee Publishers, Chicago, Illinois, 2004; Chicago, Illinois:

Facts, information and articles about the Underground Railroad

Aproximate year of birth: 1780

Ended

1780 is a rough estimate.

Slaves Freed

Estimates range between 6,000 and 10,000.

Prominent Figures

Harriet Tubman is a historical figure. William Still is a well-known author and poet. Levi Coffin is a fictional character created by author Levi Coffin. John Fairfield is a well-known author.

Related Reading:

The Story of How Canada Became the Final Station on the Underground Railroad Harriet Tubman’s Legacy as a Freedom Fighter and a Spion is well documented.

The Beginnings Of the Underground Railroad

Even before the nineteenth century, it appears that a mechanism to assist runaways existed. In 1786, George Washington expressed dissatisfaction with the assistance provided to one of his escaped slaves by “a organization of Quakers, founded for such purposes.” The Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers as they are more officially known, were among the first abolitionist organizations to emerge. Their influence may have played a role in Pennsylvania becoming the first state to abolish slavery, which was home to a large number of Quakers.

In recognition of his contributions, Levi is often referred to as the “president of the Underground Railroad.” In Fountain City, Ohio, on Ohio’s western border, the eight-room Indiana home they bought and used as a “station” before they came to Cincinnati has been preserved and is now a National Historic Landmark.

The Underground Railroad Gets Its Name

Owen Brown, the father of radical abolitionist John Brown, was a member of the Underground Railroad in the state of New York during the Civil War. An unconfirmed narrative suggests that “Mammy Sally” designated the house where Abraham Lincoln’s future wife, Mary Todd Lincoln, grew up and served as a safe house where fugitives could receive food, but the account is doubtful. Routes of the Underground Railroad It was not until the early 1830s that the phrase “Underground Railroad” was first used.

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Fugitives going by water or on genuine trains were occasionally provided with clothing so that they wouldn’t give themselves away by wearing their worn-out job attire.

Many of them continued on to Canada, where they could not be lawfully reclaimed by their rightful owners.

The slave or slaves were forced to flee from their masters, which was frequently done at night. It was imperative that the runaways maintain their eyes on the North Star at all times; only by keeping that star in front of them could they be certain that they were on their trip north.

Conductors On The Railroad

A “conductor,” who pretended to be a slave, would sometimes accompany fugitives to a plantation in order to lead them on their journey. Harriet Tubman, a former slave who traveled to slave states 19 times and liberated more than 300 people, is one of the most well-known “conductors.” She used her shotgun to threaten death to any captives who lost heart and sought to return to slavery. The Underground Railroad’s operators faced their own set of risks as well. If someone living in the North was convicted of assisting fugitives in their escape, he or she could face fines of hundreds or even thousands of dollars, which was a significant sum at the time; however, in areas where abolitionism was strong, the “secret” railroad was openly operated, and no one was arrested.

His position as the most significant commander of the Underground Railroad in and around Albany grew as time went on.

However, in previous times of American history, the phrase “vigilance committee” generally refers to citizen organizations that took the law into their own hands, prosecuting and hanging those suspected of crimes when there was no local government or when they considered the local authority was corrupt or weak.

White males who were found assisting slaves in their escape were subjected to heavier punishments than white women, but both were likely to face at the very least incarceration.

The Civil War On The Horizon

Events such as the Missouri Compromise and the Dred Scott decision compelled more anti-slavery activists to take an active part in the effort to liberate slaves in the United States. After Abraham Lincoln was elected president, Southern states began to secede in December 1860, putting an end to the Union’s hopes of achieving independence from the United States. Abolitionist newspapers and even some loud abolitionists warned against giving the remaining Southern states an excuse to separate. Lucia Bagbe (later known as Sara Lucy Bagby Johnson) is considered to be the final slave who was returned to bondage as a result of the Fugitive Slave Law.

Her owner hunted her down and arrested her in December 1860.

Even the Cleveland Leader, a Republican weekly that was traditionally anti-slavery and pro-the Fugitive Slave Legislation, warned its readers that allowing the law to run its course “may be oil thrown upon the seas of our nation’s difficulties,” according to the newspaper.

Following her capture, Lucy was carried back to Ohio County, Virginia, and punished, but she was released at some time when Union soldiers took control of the region. In her honor, a Grand Jubilee was celebrated on May 6, 1863, in the city of Cleveland.

The Reverse Underground Railroad

A “reverse Underground Railroad” arose in the northern states surrounding the Ohio River during the Civil War. The black men and women of those states, whether or not they had previously been slaves, were occasionally kidnapped and concealed in homes, barns, and other structures until they could be transported to the South and sold as slaves.

Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict, 1854-1865

There has sprung up a “reverse Underground Railroad” in northern states that border the Ohio River. The black men and women of those states, whether or whether they had previously been slaves, were occasionally kidnapped and concealed in homes, barns, and other structures until they could be transported to the South and sold as slaves there.

  • A “reverse Underground Railroad” developed in the northern states surrounding the Ohio River. Even though they had never been slaves, black men and women were occasionally kidnapped in those areas and concealed in homes, barns, and other facilities until they could be transported to the South and sold as slaves.

Conductors from Kansas may easily cross the border into Missouri in order to establish contact with suspected runaway passengers. During the war, slaves residing in Missouri, which was so near to the free state of Kansas, were especially enticed to utilize the Underground Railroad to cross the border into the free state of Kansas to escape. Despite the fact that he did not know exact ways into Kansas, one African-American man expressed his confidence in his ability to reach Lawrence, a town around 40 miles from the state line and home to “the Yankees,” which means “the Yankees are waiting for you.” Conductors frequently provided fugitives with clothing and food for their excursions, and even did it at their own expense on occasion.

  • Due to the possibility of being questioned by pursuers, several conductors preferred not to know specific information about the fugitives they assisted.
  • In the aftermath of their successful escapes to other free states, a small number of passengers returned to Kansas, including William Dominick Matthews, a first lieutenant in the Independent Battery of the United States Colored Light Artillery in Fort Leavenworth.
  • Matthews maintained a boarding house in Leavenworth, Kansas, with the assistance of Daniel R.
  • Anthony.
  • Aside from that, as could be expected, very little is known about the specific individuals and families that aided or were assisted by the Underground Railroad.

Suggested Reading:

In order to contact prospective runaways, conductors from Kansas could simply travel from Kansas into Missouri. While the war was going on, slaves residing in Missouri, which was so near to the free state of Kansas, were especially enticed to utilize the Underground Railroad to cross the border into Kansas and escape slavery. Despite the fact that he did not know exact ways into Kansas, one African-American man expressed his confidence in his ability to reach Lawrence, a town around 40 miles from the state line and home to “the Yankees,” which means “the Yankees are waiting for me.” Conductors frequently provided fugitives with clothing and food for their excursions, and they did it at their own expense on many occasions as well.

One conductor said that his horse died from severe exhaustion after a 63-mile voyage into Kansas that took less than ten hours, according to his account.

Former slaves marrying after their emancipation or joining the Union Army were among the information that abolitionists received.

Other African American troops were recruited into the First Colored Kansas Volunteer Infantry by Matthews, who also served in the unit.

Anthony, the brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. The boarding home eventually became an Underground Railroad depot. Aside from that, as could be expected, very little is known about the specific individuals and families that aided or were supported by the Underground Railroad in its operations.

William Still

William Still was born a free man in Burlington County, New Jersey, and rose through the ranks to become a member of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society and the director of the General Vigilance Committee of the city of Philadelphia. He was in charge of the committee’s money, which were utilized to aid Harriet Tubman’s rescue operations. He died in the same year. Still, a network of safe houses and contacts was formed that stretched from the upper South all the way to Canada. Still also penned William Still’s Underground Railroad, an abolitionist narrative of the liberation network in which he championed the hundreds of heroic fugitives he encountered as they made their way to the United States’ northern frontier.

Still had meant to use the information he had obtained from his interviews to aid other runaway slaves in locating their families, but he ultimately opted to publish the thorough information he had gathered in a book.

NJ Celebrates the Underground Railroad

From September 29 to October 13, 2002, the Harriet Tubman and William Still Underground Railroad Walk Across New Jersey: Celebrating New Jersey’s History and Heroes Every Step of the Way” commemorated a significant period in the state’s history and celebrated a freedom network that stretched from Cumberland to Hudson County. Secretary of State Regena Thomas and members of the Department of State’s staff retraced the 180-mile route taken by the Underground Railroad throughout the state of New Jersey on Saturday.

A last symbolic crossing from Jersey City to New York City took place at the site of the old World Trade Center, before participants visited the African Burial Ground and the Foley Square Monument, which were both built in memory of the victims of the September 11th attacks.

Pathways to Freedom

The Underground Railroad was a route from slavery to freedom in the north. It is possible that travellers will be halted when they reach a free state such as Pennsylvania, New Jersey, or Ohio, although this is rare. After 1850, the majority of enslaved individuals who managed to flee made it all the way to Canada. They needed to travel to Canada in order to ensure their own safety. The reason for this was because in 1850, the United States Congress approved a statute known as the Fugitive Slave Act, which prohibited the sale of slaves abroad.

Church in Philadelphia served as a vital station on the Underground Railroad as the “passengers” made their way north to freedom during the American Revolution.

The Fugitive Slave Act was passed as part of the agreement.

Most persons who want to flee the United States walked all the way to Canada after 1850 since it was unsafe to remain in free states such as Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, and even Massachusetts.

Consequently, one may claim that the Underground Railroad stretched from the American South to Canada. What routes did the Underground Railroad take across Maryland, and how did they differ from one another? «return to the home page»

Key People

Between 1830 and 1850, Stephen Myers rose to prominence as the most significant leader of a local underground railroad organization that spanned the United States and the world. Other notable persons came and left during this time period, but Myers remained in Albany the entire time. Stephen Myers is without a doubt responsible for assisting thousands of people to travel via Albany on the subterranean railroad to locations west, north, and east. First, in the early 1840s, he relied on his personal resources and those of the Northern Star Association, which he chaired and was responsible for publishing the publication of his journal.

  1. Some people considered the Albany branch of the underground railroad to be the best-run section of the railroad in the entire state when it was under his direction.
  2. Throughout his life, he worked as a grocer and a steamboat steward, but it was in 1842 that he began his journalistic career.
  3. He was a strong advocate for anti-slavery activism as well as for the rights of African Americans in the United States.
  4. He writes on temperance, the rights of African Americans, the necessity of abolishing slavery, and a variety of other topics in its pages.
  5. It is from Garland Penn’s book The Afro-American Press and Its Editors that the photograph of Stephen Meyers that is used to accompany this text was taken.
  6. Several pieces of information on him may also be found in the notes offered to one of the essays made by him that was published in The Black Abolitionist Papers, volume 3, edited by C.
  7. The Albany Evening Times published an article on Monday, February 14, 1870, in the evening.
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This man, who was the oldest and most renowned of our colored inhabitants, passed away in the early hours of yesterday morning, at the age of eighty-one.

Myers has been eventful, since he has lived through the majority of the most important epochs in the history of our country.

He also worked as a steward on certain North River steamboats for a period of time during the early part of the twentieth century, which was a very significant role in those days.

He was a well-known figure among his race, having worked as an agent for the “Underground Railroad” before the war.

Years ago, he was THE representation of them in their dealings with the leaders of this state.

Mr.

Mr.

Mr. Myers was a devout Christian who died as a witness to the religion that he had lived. Wednesday afternoon’s burial will take place at the A M. E. Church on Hamilton Street.

The Underground Railroad — Freedom Park

The Underground Railroad:Side 1 of the Underground Railroad According to American law, enslaved African Americans were unable to liberate themselves. Either they would be set free by their masters or they would be liberated by official action, but neither of these outcomes seemed plausible. Instead, enslaved African Americans may achieve freedom by insurrection or escape. Even among the slave states, the uprising was ultimately suicidal due to the fact that it was outnumbered two to one. Because of this, for those African Americans who were determined to be free, leaving slavery was the greatest option open to them, despite the obvious hazards and the possibility of being captured and sold again.

In order to maintain that boundary, the slaveholders and slave-catchers worked together.

The desire for freedom propelled thousands of enslaved African Americans down this road, beginning as a trickle in the 1600s and increasing to a steady stream of over three thousand each year by the 1850s, until becoming a torrential torrent numbering hundreds of thousands during the Civil War.

Many of those who received assistance did so from free people of color, sometimes Native Americans, and white Americans who were opposed to slavery and who formed a loosely organized conspiracy of conscience known as the Underground Railroad—with its shadowy hosts of agents, conductors, and station-keepers—and who were themselves victims of slavery.

  1. The Underground Railroad continues to be one of the most powerful and long-lasting multiracial human rights movements in American and world history for these reasons, and the heroism of escaped slaves serves as a tribute to the strength of the human spirit and the significance of freedom.
  2. The migration of slaves and cotton agriculture to the southwest began in earnest after 1815.
  3. The city of Louisville became to be one of the busiest fugitive slave “stations” and crossing places in the country as a result of the same factors.
  4. As a result of the numerous ferries and small settlements along the river’s banks, clandestine river crossings were possible in the 1850s.
  5. Once they had successfully navigated a river crossing, fleeing slaves might then take advantage of a number of routes traveling north, with the support of free blacks and white friends of the fugitive, many of whom were Quakers.
  6. Because it was necessary in a slave state, the Secretly Railroad was conducted entirely underground, and only a few of its white leaders have ever been recognized.
  7. James C.

Following their escape from slavery in the 1890s, former slaves referred to Washington Spradling as “a clever Negro” and a major figure in the community.

Shelton Morris was also involved in efforts to assist Margaret Garner, a fugitive slave woman who, in 1856, killed her own child rather than have it returned to slavery after fleeing to the United States.

Written by himself, A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, an American Slave (New York: The Author, 1849).

William M., “History of the Underground Railroad, As It Was Conducted by the Anti-Slavery League,” in The Anti-Slavery League’s History of the Underground Railroad (New York: Negro Universities Press, 1969; first published in 1915).

Sr.

p., 1897).

Blaine, and Hudson, J.

Filson History Quarterly, volume 75, number 33-84 (2001), has the article “Crossing the Dark Line: Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in Louisville and North Central Kentucky.” Hudson, J.

Blaine.

Hudson, J.

Blaine.

Pamela Peters is the author of this work.

Floyd County, Indiana was a stop on the Underground Railroad (Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company Publishers, 2001). Wilbur H. Siebert’s The Underground Railroad: A History from Slavery to Freedom is available online (New York: Russell and Russell, 1967; first published 1898).

Underground Railroad in Iowa

Initially funded by the National Park Service’s Network to Freedom program in 2002, the Iowa Network to Freedom project, which investigated persons and locations involved with the Underground Railroad in Iowa, became the Iowa Freedom Trail Project in 2003. After a five-year period of grant funding, volunteers have continued to collect information from historical resources and compile it into a form containing general information, such as biographical data, resource references, associated properties, and researcher information, among other things, to be used by the public.

  • Individuals (by name)
  • Individuals (by county)
  • Places (by county)
  • Research Files (by county)
  • Inventory of Individuals (by name)
  • Inventory of Places (by county)
  • Inventory of Research Files

Personal inventory by name; Personal inventory by county; Personal inventory by place; Personal inventory by research file; Personal inventory by county; Personal inventory by name; Personal inventory by county; Personal inventory by research file; Personal inventory by county.

Researching Underground Railroad Activity

Since 2002, volunteers at the State Historical Society of Iowa have been doing research into the Underground Railroad’s presence in the state. The research and biographical form instructions can be found here. If you are interested in researching Underground Railroad activity in Iowa and have access to historical documents and primary sources, please review the instructions for submitting a research and biographical form to learn how you can contribute to the project.

  • Instructions for the Research and Biographical Form
  • Biographical Form
  • Sample Biographical Form
  • Biographical Form

Iowa and the Underground Railroad

Beginning in the late 1700s and continuing until the conclusion of the Civil War in 1865, the Underground Railroad was a network of people who assisted runaway slaves in their attempts to escape slavery. It included both northern and southern states, spanning from Texas all the way up to Maine. The vast majority of runaway slaves fled to Canada from the Deep South, although a minor number journeyed further south to Mexico and the Caribbean. Due to the fact that slaves were considered property in the United States at the time, helping runaway slaves was deemed larceny under American law at the time.

Prior to the American Revolution, slavery was lawful across the British Empire, including the United States.

These principles would transform the lives of black people, and many of them fought in the American Revolution in the hope that these rights would be given to them as well.

Vermont became the first state in the new United States of America to pass anti-slavery legislation after the British were defeated in the Revolutionary War in 1777.

Apart from that, there were no laws in the newly created United States that forced civilians to return fugitive slaves to their owners.

The Northwest Ordinance of 1787 and Article IV, section 2 of the United States Constitution both stated similar views on the subject at the time.

Taking it a step further, the Fleeing Slave Act of 1850 declared aiding and abetting fugitive slaves a federal felony punishable by penalties or jail.

As the Underground Railroad network began to take shape, people began to fill a number of positions inside it.

Fugitive slaves were often referred to as passengers, cargo, fleece, or freight when they were on the run.

Others choose to play a more passive role.

The modes of transportation used varied from one region to the next, and were mostly determined by concealment and closeness to slave hunters.

In contrast to this, the majority of fleeing slaves travelled at night, particularly in towns with ambivalent sentiments regarding slavery.

In the middle of the night, conductors would walk or ride horses to the next station to transport them.

Because of its physical proximity between Missouri, a slave state to the south, and Illinois, a free state to the east, Iowa saw a substantial amount of Underground Railroad activity during this period.

That meant that when Iowa became a state in the Union in 1846, it would be a free state.

Most fugitive slaves crossed through Iowa on their route to other free states farther north or to Canada, where Britain would protect them from being arrested and returned to slavery.

Southeastern Iowa was also home to a large number of fugitive slaves from northern Missouri who were making their way to the Mississippi River and Illinois.

Numerous Iowans also became involved in the growing political opposition to the expansion of slavery into the Kansas and Nebraska Territories, which culminated in the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, which repealed the Missouri Compromise and granted Kansas and Nebraska the authority to determine their own slave-holding status.

You may get further information about the history of the Underground Railroad and anti-slavery movements in Iowa and other states by clicking here. Take a look at the resources listed below.

  • The John Brown Freedom Trail (1859)
  • Abolitionist Movement Primary Sources
  • Underground Railroad Primary Sources
  • Underground Railroad Sites in the Iowa Culture mobile app

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