What Was The Underground Railroad Apex Answer? (Best solution)

What was the Underground Railroad? It was not an actual railroad. It was a network of houses and buildings that were used to help slaves escape from the South to freedom in the Northern states or Canada.

What was the Underground Railroad short answer?

The Underground Railroad— the resistance to enslavement through escape and flight, through the end of the Civil War—refers to the efforts of enslaved African Americans to gain their freedom by escaping bondage. Wherever slavery existed, there were efforts to escape.

What was the Underground Railroad quizlet?

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early-to-mid 19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.

What was the Underground Railroad Weegy Brainly?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. … The free individuals who helped runaway slaves travel toward freedom were called conductors, and the fugitive slaves were referred to as cargo.

What was the Underground Railroad terms?

The code words often used on the Underground Railroad were: “ tracks” (routes fixed by abolitionist sympathizers); “stations” or “depots” (hiding places); “conductors” (guides on the Underground Railroad); “agents” (sympathizers who helped the slaves connect to the Railroad); “station masters” (those who hid slaves in

What role did the Underground Railroad play?

The Underground Railroad provided hiding places, food, and often transportation for the fugitives who were trying to escape slavery. Along the way, people also provided directions for the safest way to get further north on the dangerous journey to freedom.

Why did they call it the underground railroad?

(Actual underground railroads did not exist until 1863.) According to John Rankin, “It was so called because they who took passage on it disappeared from public view as really as if they had gone into the ground. After the fugitive slaves entered a depot on that road no trace of them could be found.

What was the Underground Railroad quizlet Chapter 11?

– The Underground Railroad was a system of trails and people used by slaves to escape to freedom before the Civil War. – Harriet Tubman used this trail to rescue slaves.

How did the Underground Railroad work quizlet?

How did the Underground Railroad work? Escaped slaves were lead by conductors. They stopped during the day and traveled at night. They worried freed slaves would take their jobs and they needed cotton that the slaves picked for factories.

Is the Underground Railroad nonfiction?

The Underground Railroad is a historical fiction novel by American author Colson Whitehead, published by Doubleday in 2016.

What name was given to the fight over slavery?

Bleeding Kansas describes the period of repeated outbreaks of violent guerrilla warfare between pro-slavery and anti-slavery forces following the creation of the new territory of Kansas in 1854.

What name was given to person who opposed slavery?

What Is an Abolitionist? An abolitionist, as the name implies, is a person who sought to abolish slavery during the 19th century. More specifically, these individuals sought the immediate and full emancipation of all enslaved people.

How did slaves find the Underground Railroad?

Conductors helped runaway slaves by providing them with safe passage to and from stations. They did this under the cover of darkness with slave catchers hot on their heels. Many times these stations would be located within their own homes and businesses.

Does the Underground Railroad still exist?

It includes four buildings, two of which were used by Harriet Tubman. Ashtabula County had over thirty known Underground Railroad stations, or safehouses, and many more conductors. Nearly two-thirds of those sites still stand today.

Where did slaves hide on the Underground Railroad?

Hiding places included private homes, churches and schoolhouses. These were called “stations,” “safe houses,” and “depots.” The people operating them were called “stationmasters.” There were many well-used routes stretching west through Ohio to Indiana and Iowa.

What is the Underground Railroad? – Underground Railroad (U.S. National Park Service)

Harvey Lindsley captured a shot of Harriet Tubman. THE CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY

I was the conductor of the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say what most conductors can’t say—I neverran my train off the track and I never lost a passenger.

Photo by Harvey Lindsley of Harriet Tubman, 1860. CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY

what was the underground railroad weegy

The Emancipation Proclamation, published on January 1, 1863, freed slaves in the Confederate states. President Abraham Lincoln signed the proclamation. Following the war’s conclusion, the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1865, thereby ending slavery in the whole United States and putting an end to the Underground Railroad’s operations. While the novel and the series aren’t wholly based on true events, the network itself was a very real phenomenon that assisted hundreds of thousands of slaves in their attempts to elude capture.

What was the Underground Railroad answers?

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, therefore freeing slaves in the Confederate states. Immediately following the war’s conclusion, Congress passed the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1865, thus ending slavery throughout the country and putting an end to the Underground Railroad’s operations. The network itself was a genuine phenomenon that assisted hundreds of thousands of slaves in their escape. While the novel and the series are not wholly based on a factual story, the network itself is.

How did the Underground Railroad operate quizlet?

President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation on January 1, 1863, freeing slaves in the Confederate states. Following the war’s conclusion, the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1865, thereby ending slavery in the whole United States and putting an end to the Underground Railroad. While the novel and the series aren’t wholly based on historical events, the network itself was a very real phenomenon that assisted hundreds of thousands of slaves in their attempts to emigrate.

Is maroon a bad word?

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed slaves in the Confederate states. Following the war’s conclusion, the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution was ratified in 1865, thereby ending slavery across the United States and putting an end to the Underground Railroad. While the novel and the series aren’t wholly based on historical events, the network itself was a genuine phenomenon that assisted hundreds of thousands of slaves in their escape.

Do Maroons still exist?

The maroons of the twenty-first century Accompong Town, Moore Town, Charles Town, and Scott’s Hall are the four legitimate Maroon towns that are still in existence in Jamaica today, according to the Jamaican government. They are in possession of territory that were allocated to them by the British in the 1739–1740 treaties. Visitors from outside Jamaica, as well as island residents, are permitted to attend many of these events.

What does the word maroon mean?

In the twenty-first century, maroons are a symbol of rebellion. Accompong Town, Moore Town, Charles Town, and Scott’s Hall are the four acknowledged Maroon towns that are still in existence in Jamaica.

In the 1739–1740 treaties with the British, they received territory that were previously assigned to other Native Americans. Many of these activities are open to both local Jamaicans and visitors from the island.

Who ended slavery?

President Abraham Lincoln was born on February 12, 1809, in Springfield, Illinois. The Senate enacted the Thirteenth Amendment on April 8, 1864, and the House ratified it on January 31, 1865, thereby ending slavery in the United States for all time. Presidential approval of the Joint Resolution of Congress, which sent the proposed amendment to the state legislatures, came on February 1, 1865, when President Abraham Lincoln signed it.

Who fought end slavery?

Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States. After passing the Senate on April 8, 1864, and the House on January 31, 1865, the Thirteenth Amendment officially ended slavery in the United States. Presidential approval of the Joint Resolution of Congress, which sent the proposed amendment to the state legislatures, came on February 1, 1865, according to President Abraham Lincoln.

See also:  When Did Harriet Tubman Stop Conducting On The Underground Railroad?

How was Frederick Douglass a hero?

As a former slave who rose to become one of the major anti-slavery activists in the United States and a proponent of women’s suffrage in the 1800s, Fredrick Douglass is a hero. In addition, he founded The North Star, an abolitionist publication that published articles on slavery and anti-slavery issues, in 1847.

Where did the Underground Railroad start?

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is a city in the United States of America. The Underground Railroad was founded in the early nineteenth century by a group of abolitionists located mostly in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, who worked together to free slaves. Within a few decades, it had developed into a well-organized and vibrant network of organizations. The phrase “Underground Railroad” first appeared in the 1830s and has been in use ever since.

How The Underground Railroad Worked

What country did Texas break away from in order to become independent during the Civil War what legislation obliged northerners to help in the return of fugitive slaves what was the outcome of the creation of the cotton gin weegy what was the effect of the invention of the cotton gin weegy In which Civil War battle did the moniker “Southern laws” become official for the first and last time? What role would the miles of railroad play in the fight against the Confederacy’s weegy? See more entries in the FAQ category.

The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad, a vast network of people who helped fugitive slaves escape to the North and to Canada, was not run by any single organization or person. Rather, it consisted of many individuals – many whites but predominently black – who knew only of the local efforts to aid fugitives and not of the overall operation. Still, it effectively moved hundreds of slaves northward each year – according to one estimate,the South lost 100,000 slaves between 1810 and 1850. An organized system to assist runaway slaves seems to have begun towards the end of the 18th century. In 1786 George Washington complained about how one of his runaway slaves was helped by a “society of Quakers, formed for such purposes.” The system grew, and around 1831 it was dubbed “The Underground Railroad,” after the then emerging steam railroads. The system even used terms used in railroading: the homes and businesses where fugitives would rest and eat were called “stations” and “depots” and were run by “stationmasters,” those who contributed money or goods were “stockholders,” and the “conductor” was responsible for moving fugitives from one station to the next.For the slave, running away to the North was anything but easy. The first step was to escape from the slaveholder. For many slaves, this meant relying on his or her own resources. Sometimes a “conductor,” posing as a slave, would enter a plantation and then guide the runaways northward. The fugitives would move at night. They would generally travel between 10 and 20 miles to the next station, where they would rest and eat, hiding in barns and other out-of-the-way places. While they waited, a message would be sent to the next station to alert its stationmaster.The fugitives would also travel by train and boat – conveyances that sometimes had to be paid for. Money was also needed to improve the appearance of the runaways – a black man, woman, or child in tattered clothes would invariably attract suspicious eyes. This money was donated by individuals and also raised by various groups, including vigilance committees.Vigilance committees sprang up in the larger towns and cities of the North, most prominently in New York, Philadelphia, and Boston. In addition to soliciting money, the organizations provided food, lodging and money, and helped the fugitives settle into a community by helping them find jobs and providing letters of recommendation.The Underground Railroad had many notable participants, including John Fairfield in Ohio, the son of a slaveholding family, who made many daring rescues, Levi Coffin, a Quaker who assisted more than 3,000 slaves, and Harriet Tubman, who made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom.

The Underground Railroad Reading Group Guide

With these questions about Colson Whitehead’s beautiful novel, you may have a better understanding of the current selection for Oprah’s Book Club. a brief description of this guide The questions, discussion topics, and recommendations for additional reading that follow are intended to improve your group’s discussion of Colson Whitehead’s novel The Underground Railroad, which is a triumph of a novel in every way. In Regards to This Book Cora is a slave who works on a cotton farm in Georgia as a domestic servant.

  1. Following a conversation with Caesar, a recent immigrant from Virginia, about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a scary risk and go to freedom.
  2. Despite the fact that they are able to locate a station and go north, they are being pursued.
  3. Cora and Caesar’s first stop is in South Carolina, in a place that appears to be a safe haven at first glance.
  4. And, to make matters worse, Ridgeway, the ruthless slave collector, is closing the distance between them and freedom.
  5. Cora’s voyage is an expedition over time and space, as well as through the human mind.
  6. The Underground Railroadis at once a dynamic adventure novel about one woman’s passionate determination to escape the horrors of bondage and a shattering, dramatic reflection on the past that we all share, according to the author.
  7. QuestionAnswer1.How does the portrayal of slavery in The Underground Railroad differ from other depictions in literature and film?
  8. The corruption and immoral practices of organizations such as doctor’s offices and museums in North Carolina, which were intended to aid in ‘black uplift,’ were exposed.
  9. 4.Cora conjures up intricate daydreams about her existence as a free woman and devotes her time to reading and furthering her educational opportunities.
  10. What role do you believe tales play in Cora’s and other travelers’ experiences on the underground railroad, in your opinion?

The use of a formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formalized formal “It goes without saying that the underground railroad was the hidden treasure.

  1. Some would argue that freedom is the most valuable coin on the planet.” What impact does this quote have on your interpretation of the story?
  2. 7, How did John Valentine’s vision for the farm affect your perceptions of the place?
  3. Only youngsters were able to take full advantage of their ability to dream.
  4. 9.What are your thoughts about Terrance Randall’s ultimate fate?
  5. What effect does learning about Cora’s mother’s fate have on your feelings for Cora’s mother?
  6. What effects does this feeling of dread have on you while you’re reading?
  7. 13.How does the state-by-state organization of the book affect your comprehension?

14.The book underlines how slaves were considered as property and were reduced to the status of things in their own right.

15.Can you explain why you believe the author opted to depict an actual railroad?

Does The Underground Railroad alter your perspective on American history, particularly during the era of slavery and anti-slavery agitators like Frederick Douglass?

He resides in New York City, where he is a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and a winner of MacArthur and Guggenheim scholarships.

Sag Harbor was written by Colson Whitehead.

Yaa Gyasi’s departure from home Naomi Jackson’s The Star Side of Bird Hill is a novel about a young woman who falls in love with a star. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift Jonathan Swift is a British novelist and playwright who lives in the United Kingdom.

Colson Whitehead’s latest novel, ‘Underground Railroad,’ is his finest

Examine Colson Whitehead’s beautiful novel with these questions on the current selection for Oprah’s Book Club. The Guide’s Overview Designed to improve your group’s discussion of Colson Whitehead’s novel The Underground Railroad, which is a masterpiece of literary fiction, the questions, discussion topics, and suggestions for further reading that follow are provided. The Book’s Summary Cora is a slave who works on a cotton farm in Georgia as a domestic worker. Cora’s life is a living nightmare for all slaves, but it is particularly difficult for her because she is an outcast even among her fellow Africans, and she is about to become womanhood, which will bring her much more suffering.

  • Things do not turn out as planned, and Cora ends up killing a young white child who tries to apprehend her in the process.
  • Underground Railroad is more than a metaphor in Whitehead’s brilliant imagination; engineers and conductors manage a hidden network of rails and tunnels beneath the soil of the American South.
  • A strategy to target the city’s black residents, however, is hidden under the city’s serene exterior.
  • As a result, Cora is forced to flee once more, this time across the country in search of genuine independence.
  • The tale of America is perfectly intertwined as Whitehead skillfully re-creates the specific terrors experienced by black people in the pre-Civil War era, from the cruel importation of Africans to the unfulfilled promises of the modern day.
  • The portrayal of slavery in The Underground Railroad differs from other representations in literature and film.
  • Describe how you felt as a reader about the scenes on Randall’s plantation, which are gruesome.
See also:  What Are Conductors In The Underground Railroad? (Perfect answer)

What are the parallels between Cora’s struggles in North Carolina and what the United States is now grappling with in the present day?

According to your estimation, what function do tales play in the lives of Cora and other travelers who traveled on the underground railroad system?

The most valuable money in the world, according to some, is freedom.” What effect does this quote have on your perception of the narrative?

• How did John Valentine’s vision for the farm leave an effect on you?

Only youngsters were able to fully benefit from their daydreaming.

9) What are your thoughts on Terrance Randall’s plight?

What are your thoughts on Cora’s mother’s choice to flee the country?

When things are going well, Whitehead produces emotional instability in the reader: when things are going well, you become comfortable before an unexpected catastrophe strikes.

– Twelve.

How does the state-by-state organization affect your reading process?

What other pieces of literature do you think it reminds you of?

What part of your understanding of slavery has improved as a result of this experience?

The way you conceptualized the genuine subterranean railroad was influenced by this component of magical realism, I’m curious.

Author’s Biography He is the New York Times bestselling author of The Noble Hustle, Zone One, Sag Harbor, The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, Apex Hides the Hurt, and The Colossus of New York, as well as other essays collections.

Readings to Consider Colson Whitehead’s novel The Intuitionist By Colson Whitehead, the town of Sag Harbor.

Yaa Gyasi’s return home Naomi Jackson’s The Star Side of Bird Hill is a novel about a young woman who finds herself in the spotlight. Gulliver’s Travels is a novel written in the 16th century. Jonathan Swift is a British novelist and playwright who was born in the United Kingdom.

‘The Underground Railroad’

This year is shaping up to be a banner year for the Underground Railroad, the 19th-century network of hidden paths, safe houses, and abolitionists that transported countless escaped black slaves from the slave states of the South to freedom in the northern states of America and in Canada. In March, the Treasury Department announced that Harriet Tubman, a former slave, abolitionist, and “railroad” conductor, would be the next face of the $20 note, replacing Abraham Lincoln. And now, in his book of the same name, Pulitzer-nominated author Colson Whitehead provides us with his own whimsical perspective on the issue.

Author appearance

There are signs that the Underground Railroad, a 19th-century network of secret paths, safehouses, and abolitionists that transported countless escaped black slaves from the Deep South to freedom in America’s northern states and Canada, may have a banner year in 2015. After years of struggle, Harriet Tubman was finally given the opportunity to be the new face of the $20 note when the Treasury Department announced her selection in March. To that end, in his book of the same name, the Pulitzer-nominated author Colson Whitehead provides us with his own creative perspective on the issue.

The Official Web Site for The State of New Jersey

In honor of Moses, the biblical hero who rescued the Hebrews from slavery in Egypt, Harriet Tubman became known as “Moses,” and she became the most famous conductor of the Underground Railroad during her lifetime. Tubman was born into slavery in Dorchester County, Maryland, but escaped to Pennsylvania in 1849, when the state of Maryland abolished slavery. Following her own emancipation from slavery, this abolitionist returned to Maryland and saved members of her own family as well as other people.

  1. Despite the fact that she repeatedly varied the paths she took to the North, Ms.
  2. This was crucial for a couple of different reasons.
  3. As a result, it is possible that their owners will not detect their missing until Monday morning.
  4. These two realities frequently provided Tubman and the escapees with enough time to gain a head start on their journey to their final goal in the free states of America.
  5. She eventually settled in South Carolina throughout the conflict.

Although she was never compensated for her work, she did get an official citation for her contribution to the war effort.

William Still

William Still was born a free man in Burlington County, New Jersey, and rose through the ranks to become a member of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society and the director of the General Vigilance Committee of the city of Philadelphia. He was in charge of the committee’s money, which were utilized to aid Harriet Tubman’s rescue operations. He died in the same year. Still, a network of safe houses and contacts was formed that stretched from the upper South all the way to Canada. Still also penned William Still’s Underground Railroad, an abolitionist narrative of the liberation network in which he championed the hundreds of heroic fugitives he encountered as they made their way to the United States’ northern frontier.

Still had meant to use the information he had obtained from his interviews to aid other runaway slaves in locating their families, but he ultimately opted to publish the thorough information he had gathered in a book.

NJ Celebrates the Underground Railroad

From September 29 to October 13, 2002, the Harriet Tubman and William Still Underground Railroad Walk Across New Jersey: Celebrating New Jersey’s History and Heroes Every Step of the Way” commemorated a significant period in the state’s history and celebrated a freedom network that stretched from Cumberland to Hudson County. Secretary of State Regena Thomas and members of the Department of State’s staff retraced the 180-mile route taken by the Underground Railroad throughout the state of New Jersey on Saturday.

A last symbolic crossing from Jersey City to New York City took place at the site of the old World Trade Center, before participants visited the African Burial Ground and the Foley Square Monument, which were both built in memory of the victims of the September 11th attacks.

Eastern Illinois University : Teaching with Primary Sources

However, many of the intriguing and lesser known elements of the Underground Railroad are not included in many textbooks, despite the fact that it is an essential part of our nation’s history. It is intended that this booklet will serve as a window into the past by presenting a number of original documents pertaining to the Underground Railroad. Broadsides, prize posters, newspaper clippings, historical records, sheet music, pictures, and memoirs connected to the Underground Railroad are among the primary sources included in this collection.

The Underground Railroad was a covert structure established to assist fugitive slaves on their journey to freedom in the United States.

As a result, secret codes were developed to aid in the protection of themselves and their purpose.

Runaway slaves were referred to as cargo, and the free persons who assisted them on their journey to freedom were referred to as conductors.

Stations were the names given to the safe homes that were utilized as hiding places along the routes of the Underground Railroad. These stations would be identified by a lantern that was lighted and hung outside.

A Dangerous Path to Freedom

Traveling through the Underground Railroad to seek their freedom was a lengthy and risky trek for escaped slaves. Runaway slaves were forced to travel long distances, sometimes on foot, in a short amount of time in order to escape. They accomplished this while surviving on little or no food and with little protection from the slave hunters who were rushing after them in the night. Slave owners were not the only ones who sought for and apprehended fleeing slaves. For the purpose of encouraging people to aid in the capture of these slaves, their owners would post reward posters offering monetary compensation for assisting in the capture of their property.

  • Numerous arrested fugitive slaves were beaten, branded, imprisoned, sold back into slavery, or sometimes killed once they were apprehended.
  • They would have to fend off creatures that wanted to kill and devour them while trekking for lengthy periods of time in the wilderness, as well as cross dangerous terrain and endure extreme temperatures.
  • The Fleeing Slave Law of 1850 permitted and promoted the arrest of fugitive slaves since they were regarded as stolen property rather than mistreated human beings under the law at the time.
  • They would not be able to achieve safety and freedom until they crossed the border into Canada.
  • Aside from that, there were Underground Railroad routes that ran south, on their way to Mexico and the Caribbean.
  • He was kidnapped from his northern abode, arrested, and prosecuted in Boston, Massachusetts, under the provisions of this legislation.
  • After the trial, Burns was returned to the harshness of the southern states, from which he had thought he had fled.
See also:  Who Coined The Phrase Underground Railroad? (Perfect answer)

American Memory and America’s Library are two names for the Library of Congress’ American Memory and America’s Library collections.

He did not escape via the Underground Railroad, but rather on a regular railroad.

Since he was a fugitive slave who did not have any “free papers,” he had to borrow a seaman’s protection certificate, which indicated that a seaman was a citizen of the United States, in order to prove that he was free.

Unfortunately, not all fugitive slaves were successful in their quest for freedom.

Harriet Tubman, Henry Bibb, Anthony Burns, Addison White, Josiah Henson, and John Parker were just a few of the people who managed to escape slavery using the Underground Railroad system.

He shipped himself from Richmond, Virginia, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a box that measured three feet long, two and a half feet deep, and two feet in diameter. When he was finally let out of the crate, he burst out singing.

ConductorsAbolitionists

Train conductors on the Underground Railroad were free persons who provided assistance to escaped slaves moving via the Underground Railroad system. Runaway slaves were assisted by conductors, who provided them with safe transportation to and from train stations. They were able to accomplish this under the cover of darkness, with slave hunters on their tails. Many of these stations would be in the comfort of their own homes or places of work, which was convenient. They were in severe danger as a result of their actions in hiding fleeing slaves; nonetheless, they continued because they believed in a cause bigger than themselves, which was the liberation thousands of oppressed human beings.

  • They represented a diverse range of ethnicities, vocations, and socioeconomic backgrounds.
  • Due to the widespread belief that slaves were considered property, the freeing of slaves was perceived as a theft of slave owners’ personal belongings.
  • Captain Jonathan Walker was apprehended off the coast of Florida while attempting to convey slaves from the United States to freedom in the Bahamas.
  • With the following words from one of his songs, abolitionist poet John Whittier paid respect to Walker’s valiant actions: “Take a step forward with your muscular right hand, brave ploughman of the sea!
  • She never lost sight of any of them during the journey.
  • He went on to write a novel.
  • John Parker is yet another former slave who escaped and returned to slave states in order to aid in the emancipation of others.

Rankin’s neighbor and fellow conductor, Reverend John Rankin, was a collaborator in the Underground Railroad project.

The Underground Railroad’s conductors were unquestionably anti-slavery, and they were not alone in their views.

Individuals such as William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur and Lewis Tappan founded the American Anti-Slavery Society, which marked the beginning of the abolitionist movement.

The group published an annual almanac that featured poetry, paintings, essays, and other abolitionist material.

Frederick Douglass was an escaped slave who rose to prominence as an abolitionist after escaping from slavery.

His other abolitionist publications included the Frederick Douglass Paper, which he produced in addition to delivering public addresses on themes that were important to abolitionists.

Anthony was another well-known abolitionist who advocated for the abolition of slavery via her speeches and writings.

For the most part, she based her novel on the adventures of escaped slave Josiah Henson.

Efforts of Abolitionists Telling Their Story:Fugitive Slave Narratives

Henry Bibb was born into slavery in Kentucky in the year 1815, and he was the son of a slave owner. After several failed efforts to emancipate himself from slavery, he maintained the strength and persistence to continue his struggle for freedom despite being captured and imprisoned numerous times. His determination paid off when he was able to successfully escape to the northern states and then on to Canada with the assistance of the Underground Railroad, which had been highly anticipated. The following is an excerpt from his tale, in which he detailed one of his numerous escapes and the difficulties he faced as a result of his efforts.

  1. I began making preparations for the potentially lethal experiment of breading the shackles that tied me as a slave as soon as the clock struck twelve.
  2. On the twenty-fifth of December, 1837, the long-awaited day had finally arrived when I would put into effect my previous determination, which was to flee for Liberty or accept death as a slave, as I had previously stated.
  3. It took every ounce of moral strength I have to keep my emotions under control as I said goodbye to my small family.
  4. Despite the fact that every incentive was extended to me in order to flee if I want to be free, and the call of liberty was booming in my own spirit, ‘Be free, oh, man!
  5. I was up against a slew of hurdles that had gathered around my mind, attempting to bind my wounded soul, which was still imprisoned in the dark prison of mental degeneration.
  6. Furthermore, the danger of being killed or arrested and deported to the far South, where I would be forced to spend the rest of my days in hopeless bondage on a cotton or sugar plantation, all conspired to discourage me.
  7. The moment has come for me to follow through on my commitment.
  8. This marked the beginning of the construction of what was known as the underground rail route to Canada.

For nearly forty-eight hours, I pushed myself to complete my journey without food or rest, battling against external difficulties that no one who has never experienced them can comprehend: “not knowing when I might be captured while traveling among strangers, through cold and fear, braving the north winds while wearing only a thin layer of clothing, pelted by snow storms through the dark hours of the night, and not a single house in which I could enter to protect me from the storm.” This is merely one of several accounts penned by runaway slaves who were on the run from their masters.

Sojourner Truth was another former slave who became well-known for her work to bring slavery to an end.

Green and many others, including Josiah Henson, authored autobiographies in which they described their own personal experiences.

Perhaps a large number of escaped slaves opted to write down their experiences in order to assist people better comprehend their struggles and tribulations; or perhaps they did so in order to help folks learn from the mistakes of the past in order to create a better future for themselves.

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