What Was The Underground Railroad By Yona Zeldis Mcdonough Lesson Plans? (Perfect answer)

What is the Underground Railroad by Yona Zeldis?

  • The Underground Railroad by Yona Zeldis McDonough a lit pf slaves escape to freedom. The railroad was bot a train, it was a bunch of people who were against slavery that wanted to help.

What was the Underground Railroad by Yona Zeldis McDonough summary?

Including real stories about “passengers” on the “Railroad,” this audiobook chronicles slaves’ close calls with bounty hunters, exhausting struggles on the road, and what they sacrificed for freedom. In this thrillingly narrated history, the Underground Railroad comes alive!

What was the Underground Railroad by Yona Zeldis McDonough publisher?

What Was the Underground Railroad? by Yona Zeldis McDonough – Penguin Books Australia.

What was the Underground Railroad book reading level?

ISBN-10: 0395979153. Reading Level: Lexile Reading Level 1240L. Guided Reading Level V.

Who was the Underground Railroad book?

The Underground Railroad Records is an 1872 book by William Still, who is known as the Father of the Underground Railroad.

What genre was the Underground Railroad?

In the early 1800s, Quaker abolitionist Isaac T. Hopper set up a network in Philadelphia that helped enslaved people on the run.

Did Underground Railroad have trains?

Nope! Despite its name, the Underground Railroad wasn’t a railroad in the way Amtrak or commuter rail is. It wasn’t even a real railroad. It was a metaphoric one, where “conductors,” that is basically escaped slaves and intrepid abolitionists, would lead runaway slaves from one “station,” or save house to the next.

Is the book The Underground Railroad a true story?

Adapted from Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer-award-winning novel, The Underground Railroad is based on harrowing true events. The ten-parter tells the story of escaped slave, Cora, who grew up on The Randall plantation in Georgia.

What Was the Underground Railroad?: McDonough, Yona Zeldis, Who HQ, Mortimer, Lauren: 9780448467122: Amazon.com: Books

A little excerpt of the material is available; double tap to view the complete excerpt. Double touch to view the abbreviated content if the full material is not accessible. A WEDDING IN GREAT NECK, TWO OF A KIND, YOU WERE MEANT FOR ME, and THE HOUSE ON PRIMROSE POND are among Yona Zeldis McDonough’s novels for adults, the most recent of which was published on February 2, 2016. Her other novels include THE FOUR TEMPERAMENTS, IN DAHLIA’S WAKE, BREAKING THE BANK (which has been optioned for a film), A WEDDING IN And for those of the New Hampshire locals who happen to come across the book, please know that she is well aware that the state flower is the purple lilac, not the lavender, as stated on page 8 of the publication!

She is also an award-winning children’s book author, having written a total of 26 children’s picture books.

The Simon Wiesenthal Center awarded the 2006 Once Upon a World Award to THE DOLL WITH THE YELLOW STAR, which was given to THE DOLL WITH THE YELLOW STAR.

Her newest children’s book, THE BICYCLE SPY, will be published by Scholastic in September of this year.

Yona has worked as the Fiction Editor at Lilith Magazine for more than a decade and is a published author.

Yona can be reached through her website:or through the Facebook fan pages for her novels, which she hopes you’ll “like.” To schedule a book club visit, inquire about editorial services, or simply to say hello, please contact her via her website:or through the Facebook fan pages for her novels, which she hopes you’ll “like.” YONA’S COMMENTS: When I was younger, I had no intention of pursuing a writing career.

  • As a matter of fact, I was determined to pursue my dream of becoming a dancer since I had been studying ballet for many years and was taking seven ballet courses per week by the time I reached high school.
  • For much of my childhood, I grew up in Brooklyn, New York, and I used to go the several libraries in my neighborhood on a daily basis.
  • I reread my favorite books over and over again, including Anne of Green Gables, A LITTLE PRINCESS, and A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN.
  • I also like reading a variety of other materials, such as comic books and publications such as Mad and Seventeen.
  • Sometimes you read novels that have a profound impact on your life, such as OF MICE AND MEN, which I read in sixth grade and absolutely enjoyed.
  • Some days, you’ll read the back of a cereal box or the front of a three-day-old newspaper if that’s all that’s available, because readers just need to read.
  • During my time as a student at Vassar College, I never took a single writing course.

I became so enthralled with the subject matter that I chose to continue my studies at the doctoral level.

Teachers, students, and classrooms were all people I didn’t enjoy being around.

It was similar to business school, but without the added incentive of a well-paying job at the end of it.

I, too, purchased a briefcase, but because I only used it to transport my lunch and the New York Times crossword puzzle, it didn’t contribute significantly to my academic achievement as a graduate student.

The university gave me permission to attend classes from other departments, and by this time I had recovered from my previous rejection, so I chose to enroll in a fiction writing class.

I had a “aha!” moment in this seminar.

I had an epiphany about what I wanted to accomplish with my life when it happened.

Following my final semester of college, I was hired for a position in which I had absolutely no interest, and I immediately set out to locate any type of freelance writing work I could get my hands on.

I wrote brochures, book reviews, newsletters, and everything else that was thrown at me by whoever needed a writer.

I was able to be a little more selective about what I wrote and for whom I wrote it because I was no longer working.

I was also writing fiction at the same time, short stories and a book, which was something that attracted me when I was still an undergraduate student at Columbia.

I currently reside in Brooklyn, New York with my husband, our two children, and two little, yappy dogs, all of which are adopted. I’ve been placing my latest novels in my own backyard, so to speak; Brooklyn has proven to be a rich environment for creativity in a variety of ways.

Slavery Literature Summary Activity

Double-tap to view the complete content if only a little excerpt is available. Double touch to view the abbreviated content if the full material is not displayed. Yona Zeldis McDonough is the author of seven novels for adults: THE FOUR TEMPERAMENTS, IN DAHLIA’S WAKE, BREAKING THE BANK (which has been optioned for a film), A WEDDING IN GREAT NECK, TWO OF A KIND, YOU WERE MEANT FOR ME, and THE HOUSE ON PRIMROSE POND, which was published on February 2, 2016. She lives in New York City with her husband and two And for any New Hampshire residents who happen to come across the book, please know that she is well aware that the state flower is the purple lilac, not the lavender, as stated on page 8 of the book!

See also:  Where Did Herriet Tubman Use In The Underground Railroad? (Perfect answer)

Aside from that, she is a published author of children’s books, having written a total of 26 children’s books.

The Simon Wiesenthal Center gave the 2006 Once Upon a World Award to THE DOLL WITH THE YELLOW STAR for her work on THE DOLL WITH THE YELLOW STAR Aside from her novels, Yona has authored numerous volumes in the popular WHO WAS series, including WHO WAS HARRIET TUBMAN?, which has sold more than 400,000 copies and is by far the most popular title in the series.

A brave little kid helps save his Jewish buddy by riding his bicycle and carrying letters to members of the French Resistance.

Yona has worked as the Fiction Editor at Lilith Magazine for more than a decade and has published several short stories.

Yona can be reached through her website:or through the Facebook fan pages for her novels, which she hopes you’ll “like.” To schedule a book club visit, inquire about editorial services, or simply to say hello, please contact her via her website:or through her Facebook fan pages for her novels, which she hopes you’ll “like.” YONA’S VIEW: When I was younger, I had no intention of pursuing a career as a novelist.

  • Because I had studied ballet for many years and had taken seven dance courses a week by the time I entered high school, I was determined to pursue a career as a ballerina.
  • In my childhood, I lived in Brooklyn, New York, and used to spend a lot of time in all of the numerous libraries in the area.
  • It was impossible not to reread some of my favorite books, like Anne of Green Gables, A LITTLE PRINCESS, and A TREE GROWS in Brooklyn.
  • Also, I like comic books and publications such as Mad and Seventeen, which I read on a regular basis.
  • I remember reading OF MICE AND MEN when I was in sixth grade and thinking it was one of the best books ever.
  • The newest exploits of Betty and Veronica are also read at other points.
  • Consequently, I continued to read and dance, though by the time I was a senior in high school, it was very evident to me that I lacked the aptitude and motivation to pursue a career as a professional ballet dancer, and I decided to discontinue my ballet training and attend college instead.

Because I was not accepted into the poetry workshop that I applied to, I avoided all other writing classes and instead concentrated on literature, language, and art history, which were the subjects that I had designated as my major in the beginning.

After graduating from high school, I went on to enroll in a PhD program at Columbia University, where I must admit that I was miserable.

My experience with graduate school was diametrically opposed to my experience with undergraduate education; whereas the latter promoted exploration, development, and expansion, the former seemed to require a narrowing of focus and a rigidity that seemed to be at conflict with my spirit.

The briefcase was mandatory for everyone.

Nonetheless, I must express my gratitude to the Columbia program for being so unfriendly, since it was instrumental in nudging me away from academia, where I was so clearly out of place, and onto a more fulfilling life.

‘Aha!’ moment occurred during this class.

What I wanted to do with my life suddenly became crystal clear to me.

Following my final semester of college, I was hired for a position in which I had absolutely no interest, and I immediately set out to locate any type of freelance writing work I could get my hands on.

It was my job to write brochures, book reviews, newsletters, and anything else that was requested of me.

The freedom to choose what and for whom I wrote allowed me to be a little more selective with my work.

I was also writing fiction at the same time, short stories and a book, something I had been interested in while I was still an undergraduate student at Columbia University.

I currently reside in Brooklyn, New York with my husband, our two children, and two little, yappy dogs, all of which are adopted from a shelter. My most recent works have been set in Brooklyn, which has proven to be a rich place for creativity in a variety of ways.

Free Edition

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Personal Edition

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16 Children’s Books About the Underground Railroad

All storyboards are available for viewing and copying by anybody who wishes to do so. They will also display in the results of Google searches.

16 Books About the Underground Railroad

Using the biography of an American hero as inspiration, Adler has written yet another outstanding picture book. This book chronicles Harriet Tubman from her upbringing as a slave in Maryland to her emancipation via the Underground Railroad, and then to her return to the South to aid in the emancipation of other African-Americans. It also depicts her life during and after the Civil War, during which she continued to serve others and fight for justice for the rights of women. My recommendation for readers ages 5 and above is to read any of Adler’s biographies.

Follow the Drinking Gourdby Bernadine Connelly

Using the biography of an American hero as inspiration, Adler has written another excellent picture book. In this book, we follow Harriet Tubman from her upbringing as a slave in Maryland through her emancipation via the Underground Railroad, and then back to the South to assist other slaves in their escape. It also depicts her life during and after the Civil War, during which she continued to serve others and fight for justice for the rights of people. Toutes Adler’s biographies are outstanding, and I highly suggest them for readers aged 5 to 8.

Henry’s Freedom Boxby Ellen Levine

Beginning when he was taken away from his family at an early age and continuing into adulthood, when his wife and children are sold to another slave master, Henry has always dreamt of being free. When it comes to becoming free, Henry comes up with an innovative solution: he will mail himself to the North! His arduous voyage in a shipping container is ultimately worth it since he receives a prize. Based on a true story, I recommend that children between the ages of 4 and 8 read this book aloud.

See also:  What Was A Station In The Underground Railroad?

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quiltby Deborah Hopkinson

In the midst of her enslavement and sewn-up existence, a young lady named Clara dreams of achieving freedom, both for herself and for her family. Sometime later, she overhears two other slaves discussing something known as the Underground Railroad, and she understands that she may use her abilities as a seamstress to assist others in their journeys toward freedom. It is her dream to create a quilt from scraps of cloth, which can also serve as a map to help her find her way to freedom in the North, thanks to the Underground Railroad.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroadby Henry Cole

It is just the hauntingly beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period in this frightening picture book; there are no words. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision about her future. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor lurking in the shadows?

Do you think she’ll go with the flow and follow her heart and compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot. I recommend that it be shared with children aged 5 and up.

Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroadby Pamela Duncan Edwards

A Barefoot (escaped slave) must go through the woods at night in order to avoid being discovered by the Heavy Boots who are on the lookout for them. The Barefoot must pay heed to the clues that the forest is sending him, and the animals appear to be able to assist him in his quest for direction. Throughout his journey, readers will follow him as he hides in the forest and the swamp, until arriving at his final destination. This engaging picture book offers a really unique point of view, and I recommend it for children aged 5 and older because of its distinct perspective.

Almost to Freedomby Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

Lindy is infatuated with her doll Sally, and the two of them do everything together. Sally always follows Lindy everywhere she goes. Sally even joins Lindy and her family as they boldly flee slavery on the Underground Railroad. Lindy and her family are accompanied by Sally. Sally, on the other hand, gets abandoned along the route. She is depressed until she understands that she may be a source of comfort to another little girl on her journey to independence. With a narrative written from the perspective of Sally the doll, this story is a wonderful choice for reading aloud with children ages 5 and up.

The Birdmanby Troon Harrison

Alexander Ross was best known as an ornithologist, which is a scientific term that refers to someone who studies birds. However, after reading Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Ross discovered a new passion: assisting enslaved people in their quest for freedom. His extensive understanding of nature also assisted him in determining the most effective means of escaping for enslaved persons fleeing to Canada from the United States. Ross believed that if birds were allowed to fly wherever they pleased, then all humans should be given the same opportunity.

Beautifully illustrated, this picture book offers an enthralling glimpse into the life of a little-known hero, and it is appropriate for children aged 5 and above.

Blacksmith’s Songby Elizabeth Van Steenwyk

In his role as a blacksmith, a small child observes his father pounding hot metal into shape, and he realizes that his father is doing much more than simply producing tools. The rhythm that his father pounds out on his anvil may be that of a slave, but the message that it sends out to those seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad is not. When Pa falls ill, the little son will be called upon to stand up to the anvil and take over the vital task. Suitable for children aged 6 and older, this picture book is a great introduction to the alphabet.

Before She Was Harrietby Lesa Cline-Ransome

Harriet Tubman is a historical figure whose full tale is unknown to those who only know her as such. She was more than just a formerly enslaved person. She was a spy, a suffragette, a general, a nurse, and a lot more things than that.

This wonderful picture book goes into the numerous roles she played and the many aliases she went by during her long and illustrious life. I recommend that readers between the ages of 6 and 12 read this unusual biography.

Chapter Books and Early Readers

As Emma pays a visit to the Anacostia Museum for African American History, she finds herself transported back in time and forced to go via the Underground Railroad to freedom. Will she be able to make it out of slavery without being apprehended by the authorities? This early reader is jam-packed with information, and it is ideal for children who are reading at or above the second grade level.

What Was the Underground Railroad?by Yona Zeldis McDonough

This is the second time that theWhoHQseries has published a fantastic non-fiction book about a vital issue. This book contains intriguing data, a plethora of images, maps, and biographies of people who took part in the expedition. An insert with images from the historical period is included so that children may see how slavery affected actual individuals who lived real lives and establish the link between the two. This gripping chapter book is best suited for children ages 8 and older because of its complexity.

Eliza’s Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diaryby Jerdine Nolen

In the aftermath of Eliza’s mother’s sale to a new family, all Eliza has left to recall is her quilt and the stories she used to tell. When Eliza’s mistress becomes ill, she begins to hear rumors about her being sold, and she realizes that her time has come. The words of her mother and the farmhand Joe guide her down the Underground Railroad, and before long, she is being guided by a gentle woman named Harriet into slavery. If your child is reading at or above the fourth grade level, this fictitious journal of a 12-year-old house slave in Virginia is a fantastic choice for them.

Dear Austin: Letters From the Underground Railroadby Elvira Woodruff

Levi has formed a friendship with a young child named Jupiter, who happens to be the son of a former slave. They have a lot of fun together, playing and enjoying the Pennsylvania countryside. When Jupiter’s sister is abducted by a slave trader, Levi and Jupiter come up with a scheme to free her from being sold into slavery. Naive Levi immediately learns how dire the position of the slaves is, and he communicates his observations to his brother, Austin, through letters sent to and from the slaves.

See also:  Who Wrote The Voice Of The Slave During The Underground Railroad Poem? (Best solution)

Stealing Freedomby Elisa Carbone

Abolitionist Anna Maria Weems was born into slavery, and that is the only way she has ever known existence. Her family is her one source of happiness in life; being able to spend time with them is what makes life tolerable for her. Although being a slave frequently meant being apart from family, Anna eventually finds herself alone and without the people she cared about. She is consumed by sadness and performs the only move that appears to make sense: she flees the scene. As a guy, Anna sets out to discover independence as well as her family, which she believes she can’t find otherwise.

Bradyby Jean Fritz

Even though Brady is well-known for having a loud mouth, he’s never had to keep a secret quite like this before — the secret of an Underground Railroad stop close to his family’s house.

Brady is presented with a difficult decision: should he reveal what he knows, or should he assist and protect slaves who are attempting to flee for their lives? This book is best suited for children who are reading at or above the third grade level.

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The exhibit, Freedom Crossing: The Underground Railroad in Greater Niagara, at the Castellani Museum at Niagara University will be examined by the student utilizing a variety of methods. Freedom Crossing is the subject of this lesson plan. The Underground Railroad is a term used to describe a system of transportation that allows people to flee their homes. Grades 4-6 are recommended. Heather Lynn Shanks is a woman who lives in the United States. Discipline: NYS Learning Objectives (Local Learning Standards) English Language Arts is a term that refers to the study of the English language (ELA) First, information and understanding are required.

Third, social interaction is required.

Visual and Performing Arts Understanding and using art materials and resources Standard 1: Creating, presenting, and taking part in artistic endeavors Standard 2: Understanding and applying art materials and resources The third standard is: Reacting to and analyzing works of art.

Comprehension and collaboration are required.

(Introduction, justifications, linking alternatives and justifications, and conclusion) Anchor Standard for College and Career Readiness (CCR) that corresponds to it 1.Utilize correct reasoning and relevant and adequate evidence to support claims in an investigation of substantive themes or texts by writing arguments that support assertions.

To promote analysis, contemplation, and investigation, evidence from literary or informative texts should be drawn upon.

Anchor Standard for College and Career Readiness (CCR) that corresponds to it To promote analysis, contemplation, and investigation, evidence from literary or informative texts should be drawn upon.

 Participation in the Underground Railroad will inspire the student to make a scatter sheet about his or her experiences.

The student will make a decision about whether or not to join in the Underground Railroad and then compose a letter convincing a buddy to follow in his or her footsteps.

Freedom Crossing: The Underground Railroad in Greater Niagara, an exhibition at the Castellani Art Museum at Niagara University, is included in the price of the ticket.

The Underground Railroad Is a Part of Our Heritage videofeature=related c.

Visual Thinking Strategies (handout); b.

Persuasion Map (handout); d.

Art Supplies a.

Paper towels c.

White paper e.

Crayons g.

Glue a.

Paper towels c.

White paper h.

Recycled newspapers b.

Glue a.

Glue a.

Markers i.

Pencils (if available) j.

White glue thinned with water l.

Anticipatory Create an opportunity for a teacher to explain the Underground Railroad by displaying the “A Part of Our Heritage Video” from YouTube and discussing the Underground Railroadfeature=related.

c.

Students will attend a tour of the Castellani Art Museum’s exhibition, Freedom Crossing: The Underground Railroad in Greater Niagara, as well as engage in VTS.

Procedural guidelines 1.

2.

The teacher will explain and ask pupils a variety of questions about their involvement in the Underground Railroad system.

The teacher will present the art activity and distribute the necessary supplies.

e.

If this is not the case, the instructor should create a brief lesson on persuasive writing, techniques, and abilities, among other things.

Students will complete the persuasive map, which will outline their stance in preparation for the persuasion letter.

3.

If feasible, the teacher should supply a copy of a basic persuasive letter or an outline of paragraph form.

Teacher will present a copy of the list that was put on the board with the advantages and disadvantages of being a part of the Underground Railroad.

If necessary, the teacher will offer a list of compelling terms to assist students in writing their persuasive letter.

At the end of the session, the instructor will invite students to share their scatter sheets, describing why they picked the drawings, photographs, text, and so on that they used to portray the Underground Railroad.

1.

ii.

iii.

The student follows the appropriate letter format b.

The student contributes material (written or an image) demonstrating support for the Underground Railroad movement.

Harriet Tubman, by Marion Dane Bauer, was my very first biography.

A Picture Book of Harriet Tubman, written and illustrated by David A.

Who Was Harriet Tubman, and What Was Her Story?

d.

The Life and Times of Harriet Tubman, written by Monica Kulling e.

Harriet Tubman (Rookie Biographies) by Wil Mara f.

Faith Ringgold’s Aunt Harriet’s Underground Railroad in the Sky is a novel about the Underground Railroad in the sky.

Dorothy Sterling’s Freedom Train: The Story of Harriet Tubman is a must-read.

Moses: The Story of Harriet Tubman and Her People’s Struggle for Freedom, written by Carole Boston Weatherford i.

Wanted Dead or Alive: The True Story of Harriet Tubman by Ann Mcgovern k.

If You Traveled West in a Covered Wagon by Ellen Levine is a novel set in the American West.

Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroad by Pamela Duncan d.

f.

is a novel about the Underground Railroad.

William Still’s The Underground Railroad: Authentic Narratives and First-Hand Accounts is a book on the Underground Railroad.

North by Night: A Story of the Underground Railroad is a novel written by Katherine Ayres k.

Monjol, is titled The Drinking Gourd.

3) Songs and/or poetry A.

Underground Railroad (also known as the Underground Railroad System) Civil Freedom Songs by KimReggie Harris b.

Steal Away – Songs of the Underground Railroad by KimReggie Harris c. Steal Away – Songs of the Underground Railroad by KimReggie Harris d. Steal Away – Songs of the Underground Railroad by KimReggie Harris e. Harriet Tubman (i.e., Harriet Tubman I).

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