What Was The Underground Railroad Comprehension Questions? (Best solution)

What made the Underground Railroad so successful?

  • The Underground Railroad was established to aid enslaved people in their escape to freedom. The railroad was comprised of dozens of secret routes and safe houses originating in the slaveholding states and extending all the way to the Canadian border, the only area where fugitives could be assured of their freedom.

What was the Underground Railroad questions?

About the Underground Railroad

  • What is the Underground Railroad?
  • Who were “freedom seekers”?
  • Was the Underground Railroad actually a railroad?
  • Where did the Underground Railroad go?
  • Who were the Underground Railroad conductors?
  • Was the Underground Railroad run by Quakers?
  • Who were abolitionists?

What was the Underground Railroad your answer?

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early- to mid-19th century. It was used by enslaved African Americans primarily to escape into free states and Canada.

What is the Underground Railroad and what was its impact?

A well-organized network of people, who worked together in secret, ran the Underground Railroad. The work of the Underground Railroad resulted in freedom for many men, women, and children. It also helped undermine the institution of slavery, which was finally ended in the United States during the Civil War.

Why should students learn about the Underground Railroad?

It is a demonstration of how African Americans could organize on their own – dispelling the myth that African Americans did not resist enslavement. It provided an opportunity for sympathetic Americans to assist in the abolition of slavery.

What is the theme of the Underground Railroad?

Rebellion. All the black characters in the novel—whether enslaved or free—must constantly navigate an impossible choice between enduring the brutality of slavery and racism or risking everything in a (likely doomed) attempt to rebel.

How did the Underground Railroad lead to the Civil War quizlet?

How did the Underground Railroad cause the Civil War? *The Underground Railroad was a escape route for fugitive slaves in America. *Slaves would be helped by Northerners or “Quakers” who help slaves escape to Canada. *John Brown believed that this would bring an end to slavery.

How was the Underground Railroad successful?

The success of the Underground Railroad rested on the cooperation of former runaway slaves, free-born blacks, Native Americans, and white and black abolitionists who helped guide runaway slaves along the routes and provided their homes as safe havens.

How did the South feel about the Underground Railroad?

Reaction in the South to the growing number of slaves who escaped ranged from anger to political retribution. Large rewards were offered for runaways, and many people eager to make money or avoid offending powerful slave owners turned in runaway slaves. The U.S. Government also got involved.

How did the Underground Railroad affect the Civil War?

The Underground Railroad physically resisted the repressive laws that held slaves in bondage. By provoking fear and anger in the South, and prompting the enactment of harsh legislation that eroded the rights of white Americans, the Underground Railroad was a direct contributing cause of the Civil War.

Why was the Underground Railroad important to American history?

The underground railroad, where it existed, offered local service to runaway slaves, assisting them from one point to another. The primary importance of the underground railroad was that it gave ample evidence of African American capabilities and gave expression to African American philosophy.

Why was the Underground Railroad important to slaves?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. The free individuals who helped runaway slaves travel toward freedom were called conductors, and the fugitive slaves were referred to as cargo.

How did the Underground Railroad help enslaved African Americans?

How did the Underground Railroad help enslaved African Americans? It provided a network of escape routes toward the North. In his pamphlet Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World, on what did David Walker base his arguments against slavery? They feared that the abolition of slavery would destroy their economy.

How did the Underground Railroad help promote justice?

The Underground Railroad became a catalyst for propaganda as both the abolitionists and slave owners used tales of escape to gain popular support for their cause. The abolitionists used the stories of successful escapes to rally to action those who supported the causes of equality and freedom.

How the Underground Railroad worked for kids?

People who worked with the Underground Railroad cared about justice and wanted to end slavery. They risked their lives to help enslaved people escape from bondage, so they could remain safe on the route. Some people say that the Underground Railroad helped to guide 100.000 enslaved people to freedom.

How did Harriet Tubman find out about the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad and Siblings Tubman first encountered the Underground Railroad when she used it to escape slavery herself in 1849. Following a bout of illness and the death of her owner, Tubman decided to escape slavery in Maryland for Philadelphia.

THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD Book Club Questions + Reading Guide

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The Underground Railroad Reading Guide

But first and foremost, what is the subject of this book and why should we read it? The Underground Railroadis a novel that won the Pulitzer Prize and was a New York Times best seller. Aside from that, it was nominated for the National Book Award, received the Andrew Carnegie Medal of Excellence, and was on the shortlist for the Man Booker Prize. It is also a selection for the Oprah Book Club. Please keep in mind that this content may contain spoilers.

The Underground RailroadSummary

Cora, a third-generation slave, is the main character of this novel by Colson Whitehead, which chronicles her journey as she utilizes a genuine (in this world) underground train to escape slavery in Georgia. She’s a social pariah on the plantation, and she’s not happy about it. Caesar, a new slave from Virginia, approaches her and invites her to accompany him on a journey. Cora is hesitant at first, but after another slave is apprehended and horribly beaten for attempting to flee, she agrees to accompany him.

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Themes inThe Underground Railroad

To prepare for the book club questions, let us first discuss some of the major ideas that appear in The Underground Railroad. The idea of survival is one of the most prominent in the novel. After being kidnapped from her home in Africa, Cora’s grandmother, Ajarry, passes on her will to live to Cora’s mother, Mabel. Cora’s own trek north is laden with peril, and it will require tremendous physical and mental strength to make it to the end. Another motif that runs throughout the narrative is dread, which is exacerbated particularly by cruelty.

In addition to violence occurring throughout the novel, the setting is a South Carolina hamlet where physicians are sterilizing women without their permission and purposefully infecting males with syphilis in order to “research” how the disease advances.

The Underground RailroadBook Club Questions

  1. When you first started reading the book, how did your knowledge of slavery in America alter from what you had before? Did it compel you to conduct more study or track down any other accounts of those who managed to flee? A guy is cruelly tortured for attempting to flee, just days before Cora makes the decision to go. What impact does this have on you as a reader? A lot of the scenes on the Randall plantation are rather gruesome in their depictions. Describe why you believe Whitehead chose to include these scenes in the novel. The narrator of The Underground Railroad shifts from one point of view to another. Did witnessing certain episodes from Cora’s point of view, as well as some situations from Ridgeway’s point of view, cause you to modify your mind about one or more of the characters? What do you suppose the author’s motivation was in doing this? What, in your opinion, is the function of storytelling in Cora’s survival? Who knows what happened to the other passengers on the subterranean railroad
  2. Is it possible that Ethel narrating her narrative has changed your image of her? Why do you believe the author opted to utilize magical realism in the form of an actual subterranean railroad? Is it true that Ridgeway purchased Cora a dress and brought her out to supper while she was still in chains? Was there anything startling in The Underground Railroad that you discovered? Were there any unexpected twists and turns in the story
  3. How do you feel about Mabel’s choice to flee the country? How does her character change as you hear the truth about what happened to Cora’s mother? Do you see any current events represented in the novel? I’m curious how you feel about this: “Everything had a value. In America, the peculiarity was that people were objects.” Is it possible that the concept of individuals as property manifests itself in unexpected ways throughout the book? Does this alter your perspective on slavery in the United States? By lulling the reader into a false feeling of security, the author creates an environment of emotional instability for them. What effect does this feeling of dread have on the reading experience
See also:  Where Are The Underground Railroad In Worcester? (Perfect answer)

Looking for more general inquiries about The Underground Railroadbook club? Look no further. Starting with 40 people, we’ll see how things go.

Discussion Questions – PLG_CONTENT_PAGEBREAK_PAGE_NUM – LitLovers

Questions for Consideration 1. How does the portrayal of slavery in The Underground Railroad relate to previous representations of slavery in literature and film? What effect did the scenes on Randall’s plantation have on you as a reader, and how did the writing influence you? 3. In North Carolina, organizations such as doctor’s offices and museums that were designed to aid in “black uplift” were corrupt and immoral, despite their good intentions. What aspects of Cora’s struggles in North Carolina parallel those that the United States is currently dealing with today?

  1. What role do you believe tales play in Cora’s and other travelers’ experiences on the underground railroad, in your opinion?
  2. “Of course, the underground railroad was the treasure.
  3. Sixth, how does Ethel’s past, her link with slavery, and Cora’s usage of her house influence your feelings about her?
  4. How do you feel about John Valentine’s vision for the farm?
  5. Cora gives an explanation of Valentine’s Farm while talking about it “Even though the adults were free of the shackles that had bound them together, bondage had robbed them of far too much precious time.
  6. If the white males would let it.” What is it about this that is so powerful, both in the novel and today?
  7. What are your thoughts about Terrance Randall’s ultimate fate?

What are your thoughts on Cora’s mother’s choice to flee the country?

When things are going well, Whitehead produces emotional instability in the reader: when things are going well, you become comfortable before an unexpected catastrophe strikes.

12.

13.

Is there anything about it that reminds you of another piece of literature?

Do you think you have a better idea of what it was like to be a slave now?

Why do you believe the author opted to depict a physical train in his or her work?

Do you think The Underground Railroad has changed the way you think about the history of America, particularly during the period of slavery and abolitionism? (The publisher has included a list of questions.)

The Underground Railroad Reading Group Guide

Inquiries into the topic of discussion 1: How does The Underground Railroad’s representation of slavery relate to previous depictions of slavery in literature and film? 2: What effect did the scenes on Randall’s plantation have on you as a reader, and how did the writing influence you as well? Three, in North Carolina, institutions that were intended to assist in “black uplift,” such as doctor’s offices and museums, were corrupt and immoral. What are the parallels between Cora’s struggles in North Carolina and what the United States is now grappling with in the present day?

  • 5.
  • 5.
  • Some may even argue that freedom is the most valuable coin of them all.” What effect does this quote have on your perception of the narrative?
  • How does Ethel’s past, her link with slavery, and Cora’s usage of her house influence your feelings about her?
  • Describe your views of the vision for the farm that John Valentine has outlined in his letter.
  • Only youngsters were able to fully benefit from their daydreaming.
  • 9) What are your thoughts on Terrance Randall’s plight?

What are your thoughts on Cora’s mother’s choice to flee the country?

When things are going well, Whitehead generates emotional instability in the reader: when things are going well, you become comfortable before an unexpected catastrophe occurs.

– In the story, who are some of your favorite characters and why do you like them so much?

What other pieces of literature do you think it reminds you of?

What part of your understanding of slavery has improved as a result of this experience?

Why do you believe the author opted to depict a genuine railroad?

Do you think The Underground Railroad has changed the way you think about America’s history, particularly during the time of slavery and abolitionism? 16. (The publisher has provided a list of questions. )

Frequently Asked Questions – Underground Railroad (U.S. National Park Service)

Questions for Debate 1. How does The Underground Railroad’s representation of slavery relate to previous depictions of slavery in literature and film? How did the writing effect you as a reader, given the awful sights on Randall’s plantation? Three, in North Carolina, institutions that were intended to aid in “black uplift,” such as doctor’s offices and museums, were corrupt and immoral. What aspects of Cora’s struggles in North Carolina parallel those that America is currently dealing with today?

  1. Cora has complex daydreams about her existence as a free woman and devotes her time to reading and furthering her knowledge.
  2. 5.
  3. Some may say that freedom is the most valuable coin of all.” What effect does this quote have on your interpretation of the story?
  4. How does Ethel’s past, her link with slavery, and Cora’s usage of her house alter your feelings towards her?
  5. How do you feel about John Valentine’s vision for the farm?
  6. Only the youngsters were able to take full advantage of their daydreaming abilities.
  7. 9.

10.

What effect does learning about Cora’s mother’s fate have on your feelings toward her?

Whitehead establishes emotional instability in the reader: when things are going well, you become comfortable before a startling catastrophe strikes.

12.

13.

Is there anything in it that reminds you of other works of literature?

The book underlines how slaves were considered as property and were reduced to the status of objects in the society.

See also:  Why Is The Journey To Freedom Known As The “underground Railroad”? (Perfect answer)

15.

What influence did this component of magical realism have on your understanding of how the true underground railroad functioned?

Has The Underground Railroad changed your perspective on the history of America, particularly during the era of slavery and abolitionism?

The Underground Railroad Book Club Discussion Questions

Questions for Discussion & Deliberation 1. How does the representation of slavery in The Underground Railroad relate to previous depictions of slavery in literature and film? 2. The scenes on Randall’s plantation are horrifying; how did the writing effect you as a reader? 3. In North Carolina, organizations such as doctor’s offices and museums that were meant to aid in “black uplift” were corrupt and immoral. What aspects of Cora’s struggles in North Carolina parallel those that America is currently grappling with today?

  • Cora has complex daydreams about her existence as a free woman and dedicates herself to reading and furthering her knowledge.
  • 5.
  • Some may argue that freedom is the most valuable coin of all.” What effect does this quote have on your perception of the story?
  • How does Ethel’s past, her link with slavery, and Cora’s usage of her house influence your feelings about her?
  • What are your thoughts on John Valentine’s vision for the farm?
  • Only youngsters were able to take full benefit of their daydreaming.
  • 9.

10.

What effect does Cora’s mother’s death have on your feelings toward her?

Whitehead establishes emotional instability in the reader: if things are going well, you become comfortable before a startling disaster strikes.

12.

13.

Is it reminiscent of any other works of literature?

The book underlines how slaves were regarded as property and degraded to the status of things.

15.

What influence did this component of magical realism have on your understanding of how the true subterranean railroad operated?

16. Has The Underground Railroad altered your perspective on the history of America, particularly during the era of slavery and abolitionism? (The publisher has supplied a set of questions.)

Discussion Questions:

Questions for Consideration 1. How does the portrayal of slavery in The Underground Railroad relate to previous representations of slavery in literature and film? What effect did the scenes on Randall’s plantation have on you as a reader, and how did the writing influence you? 3. In North Carolina, organizations such as doctor’s offices and museums that were designed to aid in “black uplift” were corrupt and immoral, despite their good intentions. What aspects of Cora’s struggles in North Carolina parallel those that the United States is currently dealing with today?

  • What role do you believe tales play in Cora’s and other travelers’ experiences on the underground railroad, in your opinion?
  • “Of course, the underground railroad was the treasure.
  • Sixth, how does Ethel’s past, her link with slavery, and Cora’s usage of her house influence your feelings about her?
  • How do you feel about John Valentine’s vision for the farm?
  • Cora gives an explanation of Valentine’s Farm while talking about it “Even though the adults were free of the shackles that had bound them together, bondage had robbed them of far too much precious time.
  • If the white males would let it.” What is it about this that is so powerful, both in the novel and today?
  • What are your thoughts about Terrance Randall’s ultimate fate?

What are your thoughts on Cora’s mother’s choice to flee the country?

When things are going well, Whitehead produces emotional instability in the reader: when things are going well, you become comfortable before an unexpected catastrophe strikes.

12.

13.

Is there anything about it that reminds you of another piece of literature?

Do you think you have a better idea of what it was like to be a slave now?

Why do you believe the author opted to depict a physical train in his or her work?

Do you think The Underground Railroad has changed the way you think about the history of America, particularly during the period of slavery and abolitionism?

Teaching the Underground Railroad

Inquiries into the topic of discussion 1: How does The Underground Railroad’s representation of slavery relate to previous depictions of slavery in literature and film? 2: What effect did the scenes on Randall’s plantation have on you as a reader, and how did the writing influence you as well? Three, in North Carolina, institutions that were intended to assist in “black uplift,” such as doctor’s offices and museums, were corrupt and immoral. What are the parallels between Cora’s struggles in North Carolina and what the United States is now grappling with in the present day?

  • 5.
  • 5.
  • Some may even argue that freedom is the most valuable coin of them all.” What effect does this quote have on your perception of the narrative?
  • How does Ethel’s past, her link with slavery, and Cora’s usage of her house influence your feelings about her?
  • Describe your views of the vision for the farm that John Valentine has outlined in his letter.
  • Only youngsters were able to fully benefit from their daydreaming.
  • 9) What are your thoughts on Terrance Randall’s plight?

What are your thoughts on Cora’s mother’s choice to flee the country?

When things are going well, Whitehead generates emotional instability in the reader: when things are going well, you become comfortable before an unexpected catastrophe occurs.

– In the story, who are some of your favorite characters and why do you like them so much?

What other pieces of literature do you think it reminds you of?

What part of your understanding of slavery has improved as a result of this experience?

Why do you believe the author opted to depict a genuine railroad?

Do you think The Underground Railroad has changed the way you think about America’s history, particularly during the time of slavery and abolitionism? 16. (The publisher has provided a list of questions. )

  • Using Bloom’s Taxonomy and critical thinking
  • Banks’ Transformational Teaching
  • And linking and referencing students’ own worlds, we may make learning relevant. Accurate and authentic resources are required.

Students benefit from a multicultural approach because it allows them to not only experience their own sentiments, but also to get an understanding of the world through a lens that is different from their own and that they may not have ever considered before. Having the ability to see difficulties in this light leads to the development of empathy and a thorough comprehension of the situation.

Critical Thinking

During multicultural classes, students are questioned in ways that encourage critical thinking by examining and evaluating issues from a variety of viewpoints. Voices that have been removed or misrepresented are sought out in order to allow pupils to see situations via a variety of perspectives. Bloom’s Taxonomy is a technique that may be used to facilitate critical thinking in a variety of situations. It is the story of an African American girl in primary school who wishes to audition for the role of Peter Pan in a school play, but is informed by her White classmates that she would not be able to portray Peter Pan because she is of African descent.

As you can see, questions are a very effective technique for encouraging kids to not just think more critically, but also to consider facts from the perspective of others.

Transformational Teaching

A major focus of multicultural education is on challenging pupils in ways that encourage critical thinking by examining and evaluating issues from a variety of viewpoints. Vocalists whose perspectives have been suppressed or twisted are sought for in order to allow students to see issues from many perspectives. Bloom’s Taxonomy is one of the tools that may be utilized to help students with critical thinking. It is the story of an African American girl in primary school who want to audition for the role of Peter Pan in a school play, but she is informed by her White classmates that she would not be able to portray Peter Pan because she is African American.

See also:  How Many Miles Is The Underground Railroad? (Perfect answer)

Students’ ability to think critically and to understand material through the eyes of others is enhanced significantly by the use of questions, as seen above.

Relevance

Multicultural teachings include a strong emphasis on challenging pupils in ways that encourage critical thinking by examining and evaluating issues from a variety of viewpoints. Voices that have been removed or misrepresented are sought out in order to allow pupils to see situations from many perspectives. Bloom’s Taxonomy is one of the tools that may be utilized to facilitate critical thinking. Amazing Grace is the story of a young African American girl in primary school who wishes to audition for the role of Peter Pan in a school play, but is informed by her white classmates that she would not be able to play Peter Pan because she is African American.

As you can see, questions are a very effective technique for encouraging students to not only think more critically, but also to perceive material through the eyes of others while presenting information.

Additional facts and viewpoints are revealed as a result of this style of questioning, allowing pupils to notice topics they were previously unaware of.

Slave Codes

The resources listed below are connected to behaviors that occurred during slavery known as slave codes.

  • A Look at the Slave Codes in Alabama in 1833 and What They Can Teach Us About Slaves Themselves
  • In the Making of America: Slavery’s Treatment
  • Slavery in the Making of America
  • The following are 10 Slave Codes that are intended to oppress and humiliate Black People:

Accurate Resources

Additionally, it is essential to use accurate content in conjunction with critical questions to encourage students to think deeper and wider, to present multiple perspectives on events and issues to provide students with a comprehensive account, and to place students in the shoes of those who actually experienced history. When explaining the background of events, it is usually advisable to seek out primary and secondary sources of information. Being attentive to the words of individuals who were there during the occurrence is essential.

Activities

Consider one of the topics below that you find challenging in relation to the Underground Railroad and the Abolitionist Movement, and design a lesson that will allow students to examine and discuss the topic using the strategies and resources provided by the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. This is an excellent opportunity to learn more about the:

  • Primary and secondary sources, such as text, media, video, interviews, and so on (Research Library) are available. Multiple viewpoints on topics and events are presented, allowing for the inclusion of previously silenced voices (Historians and Descendants Interview)
  • The use of critical questions that challenge students to apply what they’ve learned to the past, present, and future (such as the Interactive Timeline) The use of activities that put pupils in the shoes of persons who have experienced events (Henry Bibb)

Lesson Plan Examples

Make use of the following samples to help you self-evaluate your own work. Additional examples may be found on the Underground Railroad: the battle against slaveryportal of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History’s Underground Railroad: the struggle against slavery website.

  • A videotherapy lesson on the reasons why the Underground Railroad was necessary. Select an activity from the drop-down menu: Dangerous Escape
  • Mental Math: Thomas Fuller: Mathematician
  • Lesson in Bibliotherapy: “A Shadow Over the Household

Self Assessment

Self-assessment of the lesson plan that you developed may be accomplished by referring to thisChallenging TopicsChecklist

Summary

Self-assessment of the lesson plan that you developed may be accomplished by utilizing thisChallenging TopicsChecklist

Quiz & Worksheet – The Underground Railroad

If you want to pass this exam, you’ll need to be well-versed with the history of the Underground Railroad, including its sites and the individuals that had a role in its operation. You will receive your score as soon as you have finished completing all of the questions.

QuizWorksheet Goals

The multiple-choice quiz will ask you questions about the following topics:

  • Following are the topics covered in the multiple-choice quiz:

Skills Practiced

  • Read aloud to yourself and make sure you retain the most important facts from the relevant lesson on the Underground Railroad. Interpreting information- ensure that you are able to read and understand information on communication tactics on the Underground Railroad and that you can appropriately interpret it. Using critical thinking skills, investigate facts about the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 in a new light using pertinent themes.

Additional Learning

More information about this period of history may be found in the lesson What Was the Underground Railroad? – History, FactsRoute, which is linked above. The following goals are covered in this lesson:

  • Follow the steps that slaves made to achieve freedom via the use of the Underground Railroad. Name a few of the hazards that people experienced while traveling through the Underground Railroad. Acquire a working knowledge of the code used to transfer slaves on the Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad

Please keep in mind that while this material was designed for use in a classroom, it may be readily adapted for use in a homeschool setting. Objectives

  • It is expected that students would employ language associated with the Underground Railroad. Students will be able to recognize important information about the Underground Railroad. Students will be asked to assess their own personal reactions to the Underground Railroad. Students will form an opinion on the morality of the Underground Railroad
  • And
  • Questions for discussion
  • Set aside some time for students to get together as a group and share and discuss their responses to the activity worksheet
  • Organize a discussion among the entire group about the moral dilemmas (e.g., right vs evil) that the Underground Railroad raised

Vocabulary

  1. Bounty hunters are those who are compensated for hunting down and returning escaped slaves to their masters. A person’s conscience is the sense or character that gives them the desire to do what is right or good. fugitives are persons who are fleeing from something they are not supposed to be fleeing from. Terrain refers to a piece of land or a geographical location
  2. Stamina refers to endurance.

Questions for Consideration

  1. Inquiries into the topic of discussion

Assessment

  • To test students’ comprehension of the historical, legal, and moral consequences of the Underground Railroad, use a checklist. Each item should be assigned a point value.
  1. This worksheet assesses the following criteria: Accurate answers to factual questions
  2. The ability to articulate one’s own feelings about the Underground Railroad
  3. The ability to support one’s own opinion with facts
  4. The ability to participate in a discussion of the moral issues raised by the Underground Railroad.

Discover a range of assessment approaches that may be used with this lesson. Activities Related to Expansion

  • Activities in Support of the Extension Program

Students embark on a “cyber-journey” through the Underground Railroad, which served as a conduit for slaves seeking freedom in the 1850s. When studying the most significant periods of American history, this is a fantastic resource to have on hand during Black History Month (February).

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