What Was The Underground Railroad Why Was The North Star Important In The Story Of Sweet Clara? (Solution)

As slave lore tells it, the North Star played a key role in helping slaves to find their way—a beacon to true north and freedom. Escaping slaves could find it by locating the Big Dipper, a well-recognized asterism most visible in the night sky in late winter and spring.

How did the North Star help slaves to escape?

  • As slave lore tells it, the North Star played a key role in helping slaves to find their way—a beacon to true north and freedom. Escaping slaves could find it by locating the Big Dipper, a well-recognized asterism most visible in the night sky in late winter and spring. As the name implies, its shape resembles a dipping ladle, or drinking gourd.

What was the Underground Railroad short answer?

The Underground Railroad— the resistance to enslavement through escape and flight, through the end of the Civil War—refers to the efforts of enslaved African Americans to gain their freedom by escaping bondage. Wherever slavery existed, there were efforts to escape.

Did Harriet Tubman use the North Star?

Harriet Tubman, who grew up near the refuge in Dorchester County, Maryland, used Polaris as her guiding light as she and other escaped slaves fled north on the Underground Railroad, a path forged by freedom-seeking slaves and abolitionists in the 19th century.

Why was the Underground Railroad important?

The underground railroad, where it existed, offered local service to runaway slaves, assisting them from one point to another. The primary importance of the underground railroad was that it gave ample evidence of African American capabilities and gave expression to African American philosophy.

How far north did the Underground Railroad go?

Because it was dangerous to be in free states like Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, or even Massachusetts after 1850, most people hoping to escape traveled all the way to Canada. So, you could say that the Underground Railroad went from the American south to Canada.

Did the slaves Follow the North Star?

In the years before and during the U.S. Civil War of the 1860s, escaped slaves fled northward, hiding by day and moving furtively at night. Often their only guide was Polaris, the North Star, which they found by tracing the handle of the Big Dipper constellation, or Drinking Gourd.

What was the North Star by Frederick Douglass?

Douglass founded and edited his first antislavery newspaper, The North Star, beginning December 3, 1847. The title referred to the bright star, Polaris, that helped guide those escaping slavery to the North.

How did slaves navigate the Underground Railroad?

Conductors helped runaway slaves by providing them with safe passage to and from stations. They did this under the cover of darkness with slave catchers hot on their heels. Many times these stations would be located within their own homes and businesses.

How did the Underground Railroad affect the North?

Many slaveholders were so angry at the success of the Underground Railroad that they grew to hate the North. Many northerners thought that slavery was so horrible that they grew to hate the South. These people who hated each other were ready to go to war when the time came.

What is the significance of the Underground Railroad in Canada?

In all 30,000 slaves fled to Canada, many with the help of the underground railroad – a secret network of free blacks and white sympathizers who helped runaways. Canada was viewed as a safe haven, where a black person could be free.

What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad quizlet?

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early-to-mid 19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.

How successful was the Underground Railroad?

Ironically the Fugitive Slave Act increased Northern opposition to slavery and helped hasten the Civil War. The Underground Railroad gave freedom to thousands of enslaved women and men and hope to tens of thousands more. In both cases the success of the Underground Railroad hastened the destruction of slavery.

Is the Underground Railroad a true story?

Adapted from Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer-award-winning novel, The Underground Railroad is based on harrowing true events. The ten-parter tells the story of escaped slave, Cora, who grew up on The Randall plantation in Georgia.

Does the Underground Railroad still exist?

It includes four buildings, two of which were used by Harriet Tubman. Ashtabula County had over thirty known Underground Railroad stations, or safehouses, and many more conductors. Nearly two-thirds of those sites still stand today.

Quilts to Freedom

The struggle to free oneself from the fear of slavery is an important aspect of our nation’s history that ought to be explored. Teachers may discover a variety of tools and tales to use in order to give students with excellent learning experiences. You’ll see an example of this in the narrative that follows, which features freedom quilts. Click here to find out more about what some people refer to as a “Quilt to Freedom.” As you can see from the wiki, the truth of freedom quilts is still up in the air, and most academics are skeptical of their (widespread) use today.

Quilts were used to carry messages that assisted slaves in their attempts to reach the Underground Railroad, according to Deborah Hopkinson’s fictitious novel Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt.

Clara is a seamstress who works in the Big House on the Home Plantation in this storyline.

She also informs her about the Underground Railroad, which was a network of individuals, routes, and hideouts that was utilized to aid slaves in their escape to freedom during the Civil War.

  • By reading this book, your children will have a better understanding of the hardships and dangers connected with the Underground Railroad and the flight to freedom in the Northern hemisphere during the American Civil War.
  • Make careful to emphasize to the pupils that the narrative was a work of fiction throughout.
  • Contents of the past: The Underground Railroad, and the American Civil War Download the Activity for the Freedom Quilt.
  • ISBN 0-590-42485-8: Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt

SweetClaraSection1

(Section 1): Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt (Pages 1-16) Summary: This novel tells the story of a slave girl who is separated from her mother and forced to work on another farm owing to a shortage of available laborers. Clara is taken in and cared after by Aunt Rachel, another slave on the Home Estate, while she is working on the plantation during the day. After concluding that Clara is too feeble to labor in the fields, Aunt Rachel teaches Clara how to sew so that she may join her in the Big House and help her with her job.

  1. Keeping track of maps on the Underground Railroad voyage was difficult, especially when it was raining.
  2. If Clara and Jack are successful in their quest to locate Clara’s mother, they will have achieved their goal of independence.
  3. Setting, problem-solving, the narrator, the topic, the main idea, cause-and-effect, mood, character relationships, and compare and contrast are some examples.
  4. 1.
  5. A.
  6. Clothes to be washed C.
  7. Sew) Genre: 2.

How did you find out?

Setting: 3.

The fact that Clara was transported to Home Plantation because they were in need of another field laborer is explained in detail in Page 1, Paragraph 1.

The slaves were having difficulty keeping track of their whereabouts since the map was washing away in the rain.

Her plan was to build a map out of a quilt, which she describes in detail on page 13 paragraph 3.

What was it about Clara’s needlework that caused her to have difficulty at first?

(Page 3, Paragraph 3 – Clara’s stitching was difficult because her hands were rough and clumsy from her work in the fields.) Picking a passage is a simple process.

Steps: 1.

2.Note the page and paragraph numbers on your paper.

4.Explain why you picked the passage and why you chose it in your writing.

The author’s purpose can be summarized as follows: to describe, to entertain, to inform, or to persuade.

Sweet Clara, here’s an idea.

5.Q: What do you think Aunt Rachel’s plan is?

6.The purpose of the author is to describe 1.Passage Two Descriptive2.Page 5, Paragraph 43.

This excerpt was chosen because, via the author’s words, you can get a sense of how nervous Clara felt in real life.

A:Because the only white person she had ever seen up close was the overseer, and if theMissus approved her job, she would be surrounded by white people in the Big House.

The author’s words help you to acquire a realistic picture of what the sewing room would seem like if you were in it, which is why I picked this excerpt.

A: Clara received some linens from Aunt Rachel to hem.

33.

The reason I picked this line is because it has a historical allusion to how slaves fled to the North in order to be free, and how the paterollers went in pursuit of them once they managed to escape.

A:The lords and ladies of the county.

Sketching Characters is what I do.

There are three words that characterize the character that you will find.

In the next section, you will describe one of your characters’ objectives for the chapter, or what the character wishes to accomplish in that chapter (s).

Finally, you get to have fun with your character and create illustrations for him or her.

Character Characteristics: Motherly in nature (page 3, par.

Patient (insert name here): (page 3, par.

Clara’s Aunt Rachel recognized that learning to sew was a difficult task for Clara, and she proceeded cautiously.

The goal is to get Clara out of the fields and into the Big House, where she will be able to work with her.

Instructions on how to sew should be given to Clara so that she might work as a seamstress in the Big House.

First, put the word and the page number in the appropriate place on your recording sheet.

1) 2.

�3.Plantation An agricultural estate that is often staffed by local laborers.

5.Noun6.What was the reason for Clara’s transfer from North Farm to Home Plantation?

1.A seamstress is a person who sews (page 3, par.

What gave me the idea to make the stitches so small?

That is why you are going to be a genuine seamstress.

4.Seamstress Someone, generally a woman, who is skilled at sewing or who earns their life from it.

7.Word Wizard Playing Card 1.The Overseer is the person in charge of overseeing the project (page 5, par.

I’d never been inside the Big House before, nor had I ever seen white people that close to it, with the exception of the overseer.

4.Overseer One who is in command of things.

1.Hoeing is a verb that means “to dig a hole” (page3, par.

Because I had been hoeing and weeding the fields, it was difficult for me to learn because my hands were already rough and clumsy.

4.Hoeing is the process of eradicating weeds from the land.

7.Word Wizard CardInvestigator (also known as Word Wizard CardInvestigator) It is your responsibility to research the Underground Railroad’s historical background. The facts you uncover will aid your group in gaining a deeper understanding of the book. Methods of gathering information include:

  • Your book’s introduction, preface, or about the author section should include the following: Books and publications from the library
  • Computer search on the internet
  • Encyclopedia
  • Interviews with persons who are knowledgeable about the subject
  • Read any other novels, nonfiction, or textbooks that you’ve come across

The following are some specific items to look for: 1. What was the Underground Railroad? The Underground Railroad was a secret network that assisted slaves in their journey to Canada in order to gain their freedom from slavery. 2.What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of fleeing during the summer and winter months? During the summer, you wouldn’t have to worry about the cold. (Positive) Fortunately, the trees were still green, and there were plenty of berries and small animals to eat nearby.

  1. It’s possible that it’s too hot.
  2. (Positive) During the winter, the rivers were frozen, allowing you to traverse them by walking on the ice.
  3. The slaves generally escaped around the Christmas season, when their owners would be at parties with their friends.
  4. There was simply not enough clothes available.
  5. 3.Can you list some of the phrases and code words that were linked with the Underground Railroad?
  6. Gourd for Drinking The North Star Station and the Big Dipper are two of the most well-known constellations.
See also:  Where The Underground Railroad Was Located? (The answer is found)

Group Text Assignment

7E:123 ReadRespond – Children’s LiteratureJune 5, 200x Bibliographic Information: Ima Sample and Will B. Goode Group Text Assignment7E:123 ReadRespond – Children’s Literature

  1. Hopkinson, Deborah, and James Ransome, Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993
  2. Hopkinson, Deborah, and James Ransome, Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993
  3. ‘Under the Quilt of Night’ by Deborah Hopkinson and James E. Ransome was published in 2001 by Atheneum Books for Young Readers in New York. Roop, Peter, and Connie, Sojourner Truth, New York: Scholastic, 2002
  4. Roop, Peter, and Connie, Sojourner Truth, New York: Scholastic, 2002

The purpose of selecting the works Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt, Under the Quilt of Night, and Sojourner Truth is that they all deal with a similar subject matter: escaping from slavery. The first two volumes, Sweet Clara and Under the Quilt of Night, are realistic fiction that draws on folklore and historical truth to retell stories of the Underground Railroad and how quilts were frequently supposed to be used as maps and guides to aid slaves in their journey to liberty. James Ransome’s exquisite paintings grace the pages of these specific volumes, which are also picture books in their own right.

  1. A chapter book by Sojourner Truth was also selected because of its emphasis on the bibliographic style and because of its substance.
  2. After being liberated from slavery, Sojourner Truth went on to become one of America’s earliest human rights speakers and an advocate for women’s rights, as well as an ardent opponent of slavery and a proponent for liberty and freedom.
  3. The persistence and courage displayed by many African American slaves during this time period are highlighted in these books, which is significant.
  4. As a historical novel, Sojourner is historically accurate, but Clara and Under the Quilt of Night incorporate historical mythology that offered people hope throughout this time period.
  5. Moreover, in Under the Quilt of Night, the material is written in a poetic style to reproduce the intensity felt by fleeing slaves on their journey to freedom through the Underground Railroad.
  6. The thought occurs to her to turn her quilt into a map for fleeing slaves, a quilt that would direct them on their journey to freedom.
  7. The conversational parts in the book are written in real dialect, but normal English is interspersed throughout the narration to make it more accessible.

A driver might say to me, “By the way, Clara,” because he’d heard the master say the other day that he didn’t want to travel to Mr.

This is a picture book of historical fiction written from the perspective of a young slave girl, Clara, with a nod to authenticity through both its illustrations and its text.

The plot and theme are appropriate for Tonight we’ll keep watch,” she says.

I won’t ever know their names.

I make my fingers into eyes to explore it.

The poems are powerful portrayals of fact, fiction, and feelings- all intertwined.

Once again, the illustrations by James Ransome are rich and enhance the story realistically, as they do inSweet Clara.

The book has a nice introduction that tells about the events going on in the world at this time and what type of information the authors included.

This particular book is a biography that uses primary as well as secondary sources.

For example, inSojourner Truth,the book utilizes historical facts to back up the story of the character;In 1824, the state of New York passed a law to free slaves gradually within its borders.

.Mr.

He promised her that �if she would do well, and be faithful, he would give her “free papers” one year before’ he had to.

This book also shows real newspaper clippings, from the time period.

The language is simple and straightforward.

Although the language is simple, it is packed with information and moves the reader to emotional depths as we chronologically follow Belle (Sojourner) through her life and struggles.

Strengths and Weaknesses: Sojourner’s strengths lie in the fact that it is a short chapter book with simple language.

There are also many additional resources in the back of the book which help the student to find more information if needed.

Neely (Roop, 29).

The only weakness that this book may have is just that some details are most likely missing, especially with regard to harder experiences such as the beatings, but we feel that the author’s purpose was to focus on Sojourner’s accomplishments in spite of some of the experiences she went through.

  • Sweet Clara does still bring some honesty into the book noting that some people never even got a chance to try to follow the quilt to freedom.
  • Under the Quilt of night used excellent descriptions in the form of poetry.
  • Critical Reading Skills Development: All three of the books, together, help to promote an enlarging of students’ perspectives.
  • These books help students to really “get into the heads” of those that they are reading about.

Using these books will help students to see that they can look for primary sources and real stories to understand. They can then add other sources to challenge what contradictory resources are saying, and that is what critical reading is all about.

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt Summary Storyboard

Because they all deal with the subject of overcoming slavery, we picked Sweet Clara and the Freedom quilt, Under the Quilt of Night, and Sojourner Truth as our books for this unit. In the first two volumes, Sweet Clara and Under the Quilt of Night, the author uses folklore and historical truth to recreate stories about the Underground Railroad, including how quilts were frequently considered to be used as maps and guides to assist slaves in their journey to freedom. James Ransome’s exquisite pictures appear in these particular works, which are also picture books.

  • A chapter book by Sojourner Truth was also selected because of its emphasis on the bibliographic format and because of the content.
  • Sojourner Truth was a former slave who was finally emancipated and went on to become one of America’s earliest human rights speakers, as well as a warrior for women’s rights, a strong opponent of slavery, and a defender for liberty.
  • The persistence and courage displayed by many African American slaves during this time period are also highlighted in these books, which is essential.
  • As a historical novel, Sojourner is historically accurate, whereas Clara and Under the Quilt of Night contain some historical mythology that offered people hope throughout this period.
  • Moreover, in Under the Quilt of Night, the language is written in a poetic style to imitate the intensity experienced by fleeing slaves on their journey to freedom through the Underground Railroad.
  • The thought occurs to her to turn her quilt into a map for fleeing slaves, a quilt that would direct them on their journey to safety.
  • The conversational portions in the book are written in real dialect, while the narration is written in normal English.

It is a true mashup of Standard English and southern vernacular.

In addition, a driver might tell me, “I heard the master sayin’ yesterday he didn’t want to travel to Mr.

The characterization of Clara is strong and realistic.

I lie awake wondering about others who have hidden here.

But I find a message, a rough carved place in the wood under my mat.

Just before I fall asleep I see it is a star.

It is a powerful format to convey the ideas and feelings of the content.

The book,Sojourner Truth, is a biography; it is also a chapter book.

The introduction even talks about different types of biographies; narratives and biographies that utilize primary and secondary sources.

The beauty of this biography is that it not only presents, “both a vivid and an accurate picture of the life and the times of the subject”(LC, 235), but it also contains, “settings that are clearly and accurately depicted, full of interesting social details, and linked to the development of the subject’s character and accomplishments”(LC, 235).

  1. Slaves who had worked for twenty years would be set free on July 4, 1827.
  2. Dumont had been pleased with Belle’s hard work.
  3. On July 4, 1826, Bellewould be a free woman (RoopRoop, 39).
  4. This, too, reflects the general setting surrounding the circumstances of Sojourner’s life.
  5. As stated, it utilizes a lot of historical fact to back up stories about Sojourner’s life.
  6. This book is an excellent companion to the picture books because it is a biography, thus is rooted in facts and real stories, yet reiterates the times and trials portrayed in the picture books.
  7. The book is easy to ready and students should find her life interesting as events progress.
  8. The book is not sugar-coated for children, but does not go into explicit detail for some of the hard times such as when she was whipped by Mr.
  9. There are also some primary source photos and letters as well as some great illustrations.
  10. Sweet Clara’s strengths lie in the wonderful illustrations as well as the happy ending that many people look for and the author’s techniques discussed in the previous section.
  11. Sweet Clara does not talk about any of the unpleasant experiences that may have occurred in Clara’s life and so the balance of real life is somewhat missing, but the story is one which children will enjoy.

There realistic element of racial tensions was included in this book which helped to balance what some students might say is just a “sappy, happy ending.” The only weakness this book might have, as we see it, would be that the farmer helping them said “I’m no friend of the slave” (Under the Quilt of Night, Hopkinson, 23) which some might view as hypocrisy since he didn’t have to say anything, but it made him more believable so we felt that it still worked well with the story.

Critical Reading Skills Development: All three of the books, together, help to promote an enlarging of students’ perspectives.

These books help students to really “get into the heads” of those that they are reading about.

Using these books will help students to see that they can look for primary sources and real stories to understand. They can then add other sources to challenge what contradictory resources are saying, and that is what critical reading is all about.

Slavery in America

Liane Hicks’ lesson plans are available for download. Beginning in 1619, African men, women, and children were abducted from their homelands and sent in horrific conditions to the American colonies, where they were forced to live a life of hardship as slaves in exchange for their labor. Slavery remained in America, mainly in the southern states, throughout the 1800s despite the outlawing of the international slave trade in 1808. By 1860, there were four million enslaved men, women, and children in the United States.

A fundamental element of the history of the United States, slavery was based in racism and has continued to have an influence on our culture to this day.

Storyboard Description

Make history come to life via literature! Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt is a novel written by Deborah Hopkinson that tells the story of a little girl who is enslaved and who manages to weave a map to freedom in secret while hiding from her captors.

See also:  What Year Did The Slaves Follow The Underground Railroad? (TOP 5 Tips)

Storyboard Text

  • History may be brought to life via literature. Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt is a novel written by Deborah Hopkinson that tells the story of a little girl who is enslaved and who manages to stitch a map to freedom in secret while still in captivity.
Over 20 MillionStoryboards Created

“There are no trains in this narrative!” says the narrator. I brought home a stack of books about the Underground Railroad and this was my youngest son’s reaction when he saw them. The fact that this railroad had no trains or tracks, however, was swiftly discovered by my lads, who rapidly realized that it may have been the most significant and powerful railroad our nation had ever seen. You might also be interested in these books about the Civil Rights Movement! This collection of novels will assist both younger and older readers in comprehending the harshness of slavery as well as the costly price of freedom for those who attempt to flee from their oppressors.

I hope you may learn something new and be inspired by what you read here.

16 Books About the Underground Railroad

Using the biography of an American hero as inspiration, Adler has written yet another outstanding picture book. This book chronicles Harriet Tubman from her upbringing as a slave in Maryland to her emancipation via the Underground Railroad, and then to her return to the South to aid in the emancipation of other African-Americans. It also depicts her life during and after the Civil War, during which she continued to serve others and fight for justice for the rights of women. My recommendation for readers ages 5 and above is to read any of Adler’s biographies.

Follow the Drinking Gourdby Bernadine Connelly

This novel, which is inspired on the popular American folk song of the same name, tells the story of one family’s escape from slavery through the Underground Railroad system.

It demonstrates how individuals fleeing to freedom would rely on natural cues such as stars to navigate their way to the northern reaches of the continent. This book is appropriate for children aged 5 and up. This story is also available on DVD, with Morgan Freeman providing the narration.

Henry’s Freedom Boxby Ellen Levine

Beginning when he was taken away from his family at an early age and continuing into adulthood, when his wife and children are sold to another slave master, Henry has always dreamt of being free. When it comes to becoming free, Henry comes up with an innovative solution: he will mail himself to the North! His arduous voyage in a shipping container is ultimately worth it since he receives a prize. Based on a true story, I recommend that children between the ages of 4 and 8 read this book aloud.

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quiltby Deborah Hopkinson

In the midst of her enslavement and sewn-up existence, a young lady named Clara dreams of achieving freedom, both for herself and for her family. Sometime later, she overhears two other slaves discussing something known as the Underground Railroad, and she understands that she may use her abilities as a seamstress to assist others in their journeys toward freedom. It is her dream to create a quilt from scraps of cloth, which can also serve as a map to help her find her way to freedom in the North, thanks to the Underground Railroad.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroadby Henry Cole

It is just the hauntingly beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period in this frightening picture book; there are no words. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision about her future. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor lurking in the shadows? Do you think she’ll go with the flow and follow her heart and compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroadby Pamela Duncan Edwards

A Barefoot (escaped slave) must go through the woods at night in order to avoid being discovered by the Heavy Boots who are on the lookout for them. The Barefoot must pay heed to the clues that the forest is sending him, and the animals appear to be able to assist him in his quest for direction. Throughout his journey, readers will follow him as he hides in the forest and the swamp, until arriving at his final destination. This engaging picture book offers a really unique point of view, and I recommend it for children aged 5 and older because of its distinct perspective.

Almost to Freedomby Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

Lindy is infatuated with her doll Sally, and the two of them do everything together. Sally always follows Lindy everywhere she goes. Sally even joins Lindy and her family as they boldly flee slavery on the Underground Railroad. Lindy and her family are accompanied by Sally. Sally, on the other hand, gets abandoned along the route. She is depressed until she understands that she may be a source of comfort to another little girl on her journey to independence. With a narrative written from the perspective of Sally the doll, this story is a wonderful choice for reading aloud with children ages 5 and up.

The Birdmanby Troon Harrison

Alexander Ross was best known as an ornithologist, which is a scientific term that refers to someone who studies birds. However, after reading Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Ross discovered a new passion: assisting enslaved people in their quest for freedom. His extensive understanding of nature also assisted him in determining the most effective means of escaping for enslaved persons fleeing to Canada from the United States. Ross believed that if birds were allowed to fly wherever they pleased, then all humans should be given the same opportunity.

As a result, he dedicated his life to assisting black men and women in their quest for freedom and a fresh beginning. Beautifully illustrated, this picture book offers an enthralling glimpse into the life of a little-known hero, and it is appropriate for children aged 5 and above.

Blacksmith’s Songby Elizabeth Van Steenwyk

In his role as a blacksmith, a small child observes his father pounding hot metal into shape, and he realizes that his father is doing much more than simply producing tools. The rhythm that his father pounds out on his anvil may be that of a slave, but the message that it sends out to those seeking freedom through the Underground Railroad is not. When Pa falls ill, the little son will be called upon to stand up to the anvil and take over the vital task. Suitable for children aged 6 and older, this picture book is a great introduction to the alphabet.

Before She Was Harrietby Lesa Cline-Ransome

Harriet Tubman is a historical figure whose full tale is unknown to those who only know her as such. She was more than just a formerly enslaved person. She was a spy, a suffragette, a general, a nurse, and a lot more things than that. This wonderful picture book goes into the numerous roles she played and the many aliases she went by during her long and illustrious life. I recommend that readers between the ages of 6 and 12 read this unusual biography.

Chapter Books and Early Readers

As Emma pays a visit to the Anacostia Museum for African American History, she finds herself transported back in time and forced to go via the Underground Railroad to freedom. Will she be able to make it out of slavery without being apprehended by the authorities? This early reader is jam-packed with information, and it is ideal for children who are reading at or above the second grade level.

What Was the Underground Railroad?by Yona Zeldis McDonough

This is the second time that theWhoHQseries has published a fantastic non-fiction book about a vital issue. This book contains intriguing data, a plethora of images, maps, and biographies of people who took part in the expedition. An insert with images from the historical period is included so that children may see how slavery affected actual individuals who lived real lives and establish the link between the two. This gripping chapter book is best suited for children ages 8 and older because of its complexity.

Eliza’s Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diaryby Jerdine Nolen

In the aftermath of Eliza’s mother’s sale to a new family, all Eliza has left to recall is her quilt and the stories she used to tell. When Eliza’s mistress becomes ill, she begins to hear rumors about her being sold, and she realizes that her time has come. The words of her mother and the farmhand Joe guide her down the Underground Railroad, and before long, she is being guided by a gentle woman named Harriet into slavery. If your child is reading at or above the fourth grade level, this fictitious journal of a 12-year-old house slave in Virginia is a fantastic choice for them.

Dear Austin: Letters From the Underground Railroadby Elvira Woodruff

Levi has formed a friendship with a young child named Jupiter, who happens to be the son of a former slave. They have a lot of fun together, playing and enjoying the Pennsylvania countryside. When Jupiter’s sister is abducted by a slave trader, Levi and Jupiter come up with a scheme to free her from being sold into slavery. Naive Levi immediately learns how dire the position of the slaves is, and he communicates his observations to his brother, Austin, through letters sent to and from the slaves.

This historical fiction narrative, recounted in letters, is best suited for children who can read at or above the third grade level.

Stealing Freedomby Elisa Carbone

Abolitionist Anna Maria Weems was born into slavery, and that is the only way she has ever known existence. Her family is her one source of happiness in life; being able to spend time with them is what makes life tolerable for her. Although being a slave frequently meant being apart from family, Anna eventually finds herself alone and without the people she cared about. She is consumed by sadness and performs the only move that appears to make sense: she flees the scene. As a guy, Anna sets out to discover independence as well as her family, which she believes she can’t find otherwise.

Bradyby Jean Fritz

Even though Brady is well-known for having a loud mouth, he’s never had to keep a secret quite like this before — the secret of an Underground Railroad stop close to his family’s house. Brady is presented with a difficult decision: should he reveal what he knows, or should he assist and protect slaves who are attempting to flee for their lives? This book is best suited for children who are reading at or above the third grade level.

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Harriet Tubman is a historical figure. The Library of Congress provided this image. William Llyod Garrison was a British soldier who fought in the American Civil War. The Library of Congress provided this image. After much deliberation, I came to the conclusion that there were only two things I had a right to: liberty or death, and that if I couldn’t have one, I would choose the other. —Harriet Tubman If you enslave a people, they will find a means to free themselves. It was during the development of the Underground Railroad that a metaphor emerged that eventually matured into a culture and myth all its own.

  1. Following the drinking gourd, which served as a secret name for the Big Dipper and the North Star, was a path to liberation.
  2. Between the American Revolution and the Civil War, how many individuals managed to get away?
  3. Learn about the Underground Railroad by taking a journey back in time.
  4. People linked with each residence are shown in sketches, which provide insight into their historical significance as abolitionist groups during that era.
  5. There are individual state maps indicating the locations of the historic properties, which makes navigating the site a breeze.
  6. Seven major personalities in the movement are profiled in biographies that are backed by images.
  7. The site concludes with a section on slavery in America, which includes information on the Abolitionist Movement, the Civil War, the Dred Scott Case, the Fugitive Slave Law, and Uncle Tom’s Cabin, among other topics.
  8. Comparison of important events in Kentucky and American history that contributed to the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which made slavery illegal and extended civil rights to freed slaves, are provided here.
  9. Each part includes a topic as well as a synopsis.
  10. The Underground Railroad as shown by National Geographic National Geographic has produced a fantastic interactive journey through the Underground Railroad that you can take right now.
See also:  Which Of The Following Is Not True About The Underground Railroad? (Solution)

The Underground Railroad Network of the United States It is the goal of the National Park Service to implement a national Underground Railroad program to coordinate preservation and education efforts across the country, as well as to integrate local historical places, museums, and interpretive programs associated with the Underground Railroad into a mosaic of local, regional, and national stories.

  1. In addition, the site has a database of historic places and activities organized according to state boundaries.
  2. The main page contains links to stories about the Underground Railroad from different parts of the country.
  3. In order to complement the story of her exploits, the Library of Congress has acquired primary source material from several sources.
  4. Henry Box Brown is a fictional character created by author Henry Box Brown.
  5. From Richmond, Virginia, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he went 350 miles in one day.
  6. His account of his adventures, which was published in 1851, became well-known.
  7. Using illustrations, papers, and broadsides, this exhibit demonstrates the impact of the Abolitionists on American history during the nineteenth century.

Anthony; illustrations of the Anti-Slavery Meeting on the Boston Common, as well as the title card for Uncle Tom’s Cabin; and a broadside of Anthony Burns, who was arrested and tried under the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850.

An introductory biography, a letter from Harriet Beecher Stowe to Garrison, and his famous editorial, “To the Public,” which published in the newspaper’s debut issue are all included.

William Still is referred to as the “Father of the Underground Railroad” by certain historians.

He was an outspoken abolitionist.

A record of facts, authentic narratives, letters, and other documents on the Underground Railroad was published by Still in 1879.

The complete text of the book, as well as 70 images, are available online.

“Follow the Drinking Gourd” is a song that is densely packed with cryptic allusions.

Take the path of the Drinking Gourd.

Steal Away: Songs of the Underground Railroad is a collection of songs about the Underground Railroad.

You have the option of listening to samples in either actual audio or wave file format.

Some of the songs’ descriptions provide insight into the multiple meanings that many of them held throughout that time period.

Lesson Clara and the Freedom Quilt are two of Clara’s favorite things.

Learners get an understanding of the geographic ideas necessary for examining culture, as well as the procedures required to be a decent citizen in American society.

Various Routes to Freedom: Quilts It is the goal of these activities to educate students about the secret codes that may have been used on the Underground Railroad over its history.

Connections with the Community Instruct pupils to find Underground Railroad stops and the locations of those stations.

First-person accounts should be researched and analyzed.

What do you think they would have done if they had been in the same position?

No matter whatever activities you pick, your students will have a greater understanding of the Underground Railroad and its significance in American history as a result of their participation.

From 5 to 12, explain the core ideas of abolitionism and contrast the antislavery viewpoints of the movement’s “immediatetists” and “gradualists.” 9-12 Contrast and contrast the perspectives of African American and white abolitionists on the question of the African American’s role in society in the nineteenth century.

Henry Box Brown is a fictional character created by author Henry Box Brown. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provided the image.

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt (Paperback)

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Description

renowned novelist Deborah Hopkinson collaborates with Coretta Scott King Award winner James Ransome to tell an uplifting story about the Underground Railroad’s spirit of innovation and tenacity. Slave and seamstress on Home Plantation, Clara longs for independence not just for herself but also for her family and friends. In the course of overhearing a talk about the Underground Railroad, she has a spark of inspiration. She creates a map out of shreds of fabric from her work in the Big House and bits and pieces of information obtained from other slaves that the master would never even recognize as being her work.

This fictitious account of the Underground Railroad, written and illustrated by the award-winning author-illustrator pair Deborah Hopkinson and James Ransome, continues to inspire young readers 25 years after it was first published.

About the Author

Coretta Scott King Award winner James Ransome and distinguished novelist Deborah Hopkinson collaborate on an uplifting story of imagination and persistence on the Underground Railroad. Slave and seamstress on Home Plantation, Clara dreams of freedom—not only for herself but also for her family and friends. In the course of overhearing a talk concerning the Underground Railroad, she receives a flash of insight. In the Big House, she makes a map out of bits of cloth left over from her job there, as well as information obtained from other slaves, which the master would never recognize.

Twenty-five years after its initial publication, this fictional account of the Underground Railroad by the award-winning author-illustrator combination of Deborah Hopkinson and James Ransome continues to inspire young readers.

Starred review in Publishers Weekly.

Praise For…

“This is a particularly excellent method to introduce the subject to younger children, infusing their comprehension of a terrible but significant chapter in the country’s history with a trenchant immediacy.” -(starred)Horn Book is a novel. “This outstanding novel is a triumph of the human spirit.” -Publishers Weekly (with a star). Specifications of the product ISBN:9780679874720ISBN-10:0679874720 Dragonfly Books is the publisher. The publication date is the 10th of July, 1995. Pages:40 Language:English Reading Rainbow Books is a series of books that you may read.

7 years old is the maximum age.

Grade Level 2 is the bare minimum.

Geography and Literature: African American Experience in North Carolina

Patsy Hill, NCGA Teacher Consultant, wrote a paper titled Geography and Literature: African American Experience in North Carolina. Take the path of the Drinking Gourd. Written by F.N. Monjo It was not simple for a slave from the southern United States to flee to safety in the northern United States. The slaves did not have any maps to guide them on their perilous trips.

The North Star, which could only be found by utilizing the Big Dipper, was their sole source of guidance. The Big Dipper was referred to as the “drinking gourd” by the ancients. The drinking gourd and the North Star were both adopted as emblems of liberty and independence. Ideas for lessons include:

  1. Tell the tale to the class and show them the video at the end. The Drinking Gourd, made by Rabbit Ears and told by Morgan Freeman, if accessible, should be followed. Talk about the narrative with the rest of the class. If you have a video of the song, sing along to it. Introduce the pupils to the constellations of the Big Dipper and the North Star. Making holes in transparent wrap and laying it over an empty tube will serve as a model for the constellation, so get creative! Using a flashlight, shine it on the wall or ceiling of a darkened room
  2. A drinking gourd hung out on the porch of a house functioned as symbolic representation of the fact that it was a safe location for an escaping slave to take refuge. Instruct children to create symbols that represent secure hiding spots. Remind pupils that it is critical that their logos be ones that may have been understood by a slave but would be difficult to decipher for others. Write a short tale from the point of view of a slave, describing life in slavery or the path to liberation.

Clara and the Freedom Quilt are two of Clara’s favorite things. Deborah Hopkinson contributed to this article. Clara works as a seamstress and a slave on the Home Plantation in the South. She is aware that the Underground Railroad may be able to take her to safety. The only challenge is figuring out where to look. The map she creates is so secret that even her owner is unaware that she is trying to flee. She does this by stitching together bits of fabric with scraps of information acquired from other slaves.

  1. Clara and the Freedom Quilt are two of the most beloved characters in the world. Deborah Hopkinson contributed to this report. Clara works as a seamstress and as a slave on the Home Plantation in the South Carolina Low Country. She is aware that the Underground Railroad may be able to take her to liberation. One issue is determining where to look. The map she creates is so secret that even her owner will not realize that she is going to flee is pieced together from bits of fabric and scraps of information acquired from other slaves. Concepts to Include in Your Lesson Plan

FEBRUARY 2018

Dear Read20 Book Club members and their families, This February, we commemorate African American History Month in the United States, during which we pay honor to the generations of African Americans who overcame difficulties to become full citizens of the United States. This month, we pay particular tribute to the contributions of African-Americans to every field of endeavor throughout our nation’s history. A special folk song called “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” written by Jeanette Winter, is the subject of this book.

The study of history and the ability to learn from the past are critical because they allow us to better understand why and where we are today, to learn from our mistakes, and to make more informed judgments about the future.

During your reading of the narrative and listening to the music, stop to examine the difficulties that these men and women had to endure while working as slaves and finding their way to freedom.

Crissy Haslam is a woman who works in the fashion industry.

Fun Family Activities

Thank you for participating in the Read20 Book Club. This February, we commemorate African American History Month in the United States, a time in which we pay honor to the generations of African Americans who overcame obstacles to achieve full citizenship in the country. It is especially important to recognize the contributions of African-Americans to every field of endeavor throughout our history during this month. A special folk song called “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” written by Jeanette Winter, is the subject of this book.

In order to better understand why and where we are right now, as well as to learn from our mistakes, it is critical that we study history and draw lessons from the past.

As one example of the numerous methods slaves tried to flee, this narrative provides us with valuable insight into what many slaves had to endure and how they may have felt.

Continue to enjoy yourself while you read. Cristy Haslam is a woman who works in the hospitality industry. Mrs. Tennessee’s First Lady

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