What Were Underground Railroad Songs Called? (Suits you)

Songs were used in everyday life by African slaves. Singing was tradition brought from Africa by the first slaves; sometimes their songs are called spirituals. Singing served many purposes such as providing repetitive rhythm for repetitive manual work, inspiration and motivation.

What made the Underground Railroad so successful?

  • The Underground Railroad was established to aid enslaved people in their escape to freedom. The railroad was comprised of dozens of secret routes and safe houses originating in the slaveholding states and extending all the way to the Canadian border, the only area where fugitives could be assured of their freedom.

What type of songs did slaves sing?

Slave music took diverse forms. Although the Negro spirituals are the best known form of slave music, in fact secular music was as common as sacred music. There were field hollers, sung by individuals, work songs, sung by groups of laborers, and satirical songs.

What music did Harriet Tubman like?

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot Coming for to carry me home, Perhaps one of the most enduring songs of this time period, “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” is said to be Harriet Tubman’s favorite. If a slave heard this song in the South, they knew they had to prepare for escape.

Did Harriet Tubman use songs?

Fact: Tubman sang two songs while operating her rescue missions. Both are listed in Sarah Bradford’s biography Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman: “Go Down Moses,” and, “Bound For the Promised Land.” Tubman said she changed the tempo of the songs to indicate whether it was safe to come out or not.

What songs were like Swing Low Sweet Chariot Steal Away to Jesus and the Gospel Train?

Songs such as “Steal Away to Jesus”, “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot”, “Wade in the Water” and the “Gospel Train” are songs with hidden codes, not only about having faith in God, but containing hidden messages for slaves to run away on their own, or with the Underground Railroad.

What is the hidden message in Wade in the Water?

For example, Harriet Tubman used the song “Wade in the Water” to tell escaping slaves to get off the trail and into the water to make sure the dogs slavecatchers used couldn’t sniff out their trail. People walking through water did not leave a scent trail that dogs could follow.

What language did slaves speak?

In the English colonies Africans spoke an English-based Atlantic Creole, generally called plantation creole. Low Country Africans spoke an English-based creole that came to be called Gullah.

Who Wrote the Songs of the Underground Railroad?

The very first sonic reference director Barry Jenkins sent to composer and frequent collaborator Nicholas Britell for “The Underground Railroad,” the epic 10-part Amazon series, was a cryptic audio message of a drilling sound.

Who first sang Wade in the Water?

The Sunset Four Jubilee Singers made the first commercial recording of “Wade in the Water” in 1925—released by Paramount Records. W. E. B. Du Bois called this genre of songs the Sorrow Songs. “Wade in the Water” is associated with songs of the Underground Railroad.

How many slaves did Jefferson own?

Despite working tirelessly to establish a new nation founded upon principles of freedom and egalitarianism, Jefferson owned over 600 enslaved people during his lifetime, the most of any U.S. president.

What was the hidden message in the song Steal Away?

“Steal Away” advocates forbearance rather than a call to action. (Many other spirituals contained hidden messages, the most famous being “ Follow the Drinking Gourd.” Others are “Wade in the Water,” “Ride the Chariot,” and “Swing Low Sweet Chariot.”)

What does looked over Jordan mean?

I looked over Jordan, and what did I see? I looked over the River Jordan (in Biblical Israel), and what did I see? This scene corresponds to the lyrics that refer to a “band of angels coming across the Jordan River to carry me home.”

Songs of the Underground Railroad – Wikipedia

Finding Polaris (Ursae Minoris), the North Star, can be accomplished by picturing a line running from Merak () to Dubhe () and then extending it for five times the distance between Dubhe () and Polaris. The title of the song is thought to be a reference to the star configuration (anasterism) known in America as the Big Dipper and in Europe as The Plough, both of which are visible in the night sky. The Big Dipper’s pointer stars are in perfect alignment with the North Star. As a result, the repeated lyric “Follow the Drinkin’ Gourd” in this song is sometimes understood as a directive to runaway slaves to trek north by following the North Star in this song.

Songs were used to send messages and directions regarding when, where, and how to flee, as well as to warn slaves of hazards and difficulties they may encounter along the way, because it was prohibited in most slave states to educate slaves to read or write.

Songs

Imagining a line from Merak () to Dubhe (), and then extending it for five times the distance between Dubhe () and Polaris (Ursae Minoris), is how you find Polaris, the North Star, in the night sky. This star configuration (anasterism) is known as the Big Dipper in America and The Plough in Europe. The title of the song is thought to be a reference to this star formation (anasterism). In alignment with the North Star, the pointer stars of the Big Dipper are visible. Thus, the repeated line “Follow the Drinkin’ Gourd” in this song is frequently read as an advice to fleeing slaves to get north by following the North Star, as in the song.

Songs were used to send messages and directions about when, when, and how to flee, as well as to warn slaves of hazards and difficulties they may encounter along the way, because it was prohibited in most slave states to educate them to read or write.

Urban legend or truth

While many people think that the stories related about the songs of the Underground Railroad are real, there are also many others who feel the stories are not factual. Some believe that songs of the Underground Railroad are urban legends that date back to the late twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first century. Skeptics contend that the narrative has been taken up by credulous authors and published as fact without any historical backing. Some authors who believe the song contained instructions for escaping slavery acknowledge the ephemeral nature of oral history, frequently prefacing their statements with phrases such as “supposed,” “according to folklorists,” and “gospelologists cite” to emphasize the transient nature of oral history.

” The arguments of some researchers are that while slave songs may have conveyed hope for release from the woes of this life, these songs did not provide literal assistance to runaway slaves.

There is evidence, however, that Harriet Tubman, a conductor on the Underground Railroad, made use of at least two songs.

According to Tubman’s biography, Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman, published in 1869, she used the song “Go Down Moses” as one of two code songs to communicate with fugitive enslaved persons fleeing from Maryland, according to Bradford’s book.

“Follow the Drinkin’ Gourd”

While many people think that the stories given about the songs of the Underground Railroad are authentic, there are also many others who feel the stories are not accurate. Songs of the Underground Railroad, according to some, are urban legends that date back to the late twentieth century and the early twentieth century. Skeptics assert that the mythology has been taken up by credulous authors and published as reality without any historical proof. Even some of the authors who believe the song contained advice for fleeing slavery acknowledge the transient character of oral history, frequently prefacing their assertions with qualifiers like “supposed,” “according to folklorists,” and “according to gospelologists.” However, while many popular sources assert that spirituals and other songs, such as ” Steal Away ” and ” Follow the Drinkin’ Gourd “, included coded information and assisted persons in navigating the railroad, these sources provide no traditional archival evidence to support these assertions.

The assertions of some researchers are that while slave songs may have conveyed hope for liberation from the sufferings of this life, these songs did not provide literal assistance to runaway slaves.

The Underground Railroad conductor Harriet Tubman is known to have used at least two songs, according to historical sources.

Songs associated with the Underground Railroad

  • Following the Drinking Gourd
  • Go Down Moses
  • Let Us Break Bread Together
  • Swing Low, Sweet Chariot
  • Steal Away(To Jesus)
  • Wade in the Water
  • Song of the Free
  • Follow the Drinking Gourd
  • Swing Low, Sweet Chariot On his album Africa/Brass, John Coltrane has a song named “Song of the Underground Railroad,” as well as “Down in the River to Pray,” ” Michael Row the Boat Ashore,” and ” Down in the River to Pray.”

See also

  • Songs like ” Jimmy Crack Corn,” ” Slave Songs of the United States,” and ” The Gospel Train” are among the best-known.

References

  1. ‘Follow the Drinking Gourd, A Cultural History’ is a book about following the drinking gourd. “Collection Story,” “Follow the Drinking Gourd: A Cultural History,” “Follow the Drinking Gourd: A Cultural History.” Song lyrics were retrieved on October 18, 2010
  2. This page was last modified on August 9, 2010. Ray Watson is the author of “Ezekiel’s Wheels” and “The Secret Place.” This page was last modified on August 9, 2010. Curry Brothers Publishing (2006) published the book The Legend of the Dancing Trees, Teachers Resource, written by Kenneth Curry and Gladys Menzies with Robert Curry. Every Time I Feel the Spirit: 101 Best-Loved Psalms, Gospel Hymns, and Other Spiritual Songs, by Gwendolin Sims Warren In Spiritual Songs of the African-American Church, published by Owl Books in 1999, p. 16 it is stated: Three of the songs in this spirituals section, ” Swing Low, Sweet Chariot “, “Go Down, Moses “, and “Steal Away “, are sung in the following ways: Craig Werner’s book, A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race, and the Soul of America, is a must-read. According to the University of Michigan Press (2006), p. 7: “Songs like, “Wade in the water,” “Good news, de chariot’s coming,” “Swing low sweet chariot,” and “Steal away” were all supposed to have coded meanings, according to Claude A. Green, Jr.’s OurStory: Putting Color Back Into His-Story: What We Dragged Out of Slavery, Infinity Publishing (2006), p. 47: “Songs like, “Wade in the water,” ” The following is taken from William C. Kashatus’ Just over the Line: Chester County and the Underground Railroad, published by the Chester County Historical Society in 2002, page 18: ” “A song called “Follow the Drinking Gourd” was used by some slaves to communicate their desire to emancipate themselves, according to folklorists, and the words contained hidden messages. “Wade in the Water, Children,” says the instructor. “Let’s get together and have some bread.””
  3. s^ Keys to the Rain: The Definitive Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, Billboard Books (2004), p. 665: Oliver Trager, Keys to the Rain: The Definitive Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, Billboard Books (2004), p. 665: “Gospelologists point to the song ” Wade in the Water ” as an example of a song that was written for one reason but was covertly utilized for a different one. Slaves recited it as part of the baptismal rite, but it was also used by Underground RailroadconductorHarriet Tubman (dubbed “a woman name Moses”) to communicate to fugitive slaves fleeing to the North that they should “wade in the water” in order to throw bloodhounds off their scent as they attempted to reach the North.”
  4. s^ Marc Aronson’s article “History That Never Happened” appeared in the April 1, 2007 issue of School Library Journal. James Kelley is the author of this work (April 2008). “Whether via song, tale, or history, African American spirituals are defying claims of a hidden message. “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” the drinking gourd says “. In 2008, The Journal of Popular Culture published 41(2): 262–80 with the doi: 10.1111/j.1540-5931.2008.00502.x
  5. Joel Bresler’s “Follow the Drinking Gourd: A Cultural History” is available online. retrieved on 2008-05-05
  6. See pages 26–27
  7. Marc Aronson’s article “History That Never Happened” appeared in the April 1, 2007 issue of School Library Journal. “There may be an older version of “Follow the Drinkin’ Gourd” that was sung by escaping slaves, and this may be the discovery of some industrious researcher in the future. Our job to young readers, in the meantime, is to pay attention to our own doubts and to be candid skeptics in our own lives. It is up to the next generation of scholars to demonstrate that we were mistaken
  8. “Song, Story, or History: Resisting Claims of a Coded Message in the African American Spiritual “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” The Journal of Popular American Culture 41.2 (April 2008): 262–80
  9. H.B. Parks in Volume VII of the Publications of the Texas Folk-Lore Society). James Kelley, ” Song, Story, or History: Resisting Claims of a Coded Message in the African American Spiritual “Follow “
  10. In addition, there is the constellation known as the Big Dipper, which is utilized for navigational purposes. The North Star will always point you in the right direction. Tubman is said to have utilized the Big Dipper and the North Star as navigational aids. In the words of some authors, Tubman would explain that her father taught her about the Big Dipper so that she would always know where she was on her road to freedom
  11. AbcWilliam C. Kashatus,Just over the Line: Chester County and the Underground Railroad, Chester County Historical Society (2002), p. 18
  12. AbcGwendolin Sims Warren,Ev’ry Time I Feel the Spirit: 101 Best-Loved Psalms, Gospel Hymns, and Spirituals, p. 18
  13. AbcWilliam C. Kashatus,Just over the Line: Chester County and the Underground Railroad, Chester Spiritual Songs of the African-American Church, Owl Books (1999), p. 16
  14. Ab Spiritual Songs of the African-American Church, Owl Books (1999), p. 16
  15. Claude A. Green, Jr., OurStory: Putting Color Back Into His-Story: What We Dragged Out of Slavery, Infinity Publishing (2006), p. 47
  16. Craig Werner, A Change Is Gonna Come: Music, Race, and the Soul of America, Infinity Publishing (2006), p. 47
  17. Claude A. Green, Jr., OurStory: Putting Color Back Into His-Story: What We Dragged Out of Slavery, Infinity Publishing 665
  18. Oliver Trager, Keys to the Rain: The Definitive Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, Billboard Books (2004)
  19. University of Michigan Press (2006), p. 7
See also:  How To Work For Operation Underground Railroad? (Best solution)

Songs of the Underground Railroad : Harriet Tubman

African slaves incorporated songs into their daily routines. Singing was a custom brought to America by the earliest slaves from Africa; their songs are frequently referred to as spirituals. It performed a variety of functions, including supplying repeating rhythm for repetitive physical labor, as well as serving as an inspiration and incentive. Singing was also used to communicate their shared beliefs and solidarity with one another, as well as to mark important occasions. Because the majority of slaves were illiterate, songs were employed to help them recall and communicate with one another.

Music coded with instructions on how to escape, also known as signal songs, or where to rendezvous, known as map songs, was played during the performance.

Songs made use of biblical allusions and comparisons to biblical characters, places, and tales, while also drawing parallels between them and their own past of enslavement.

To a slave, however, it meant being ready to go to Canada. Listed here are the lyrics to several popular songs that have been passed down through the years.

In Wade in the Water

Tubman used the phrase “Wade in the Water” to instruct slaves to enter the water in order to avoid being spotted and make it through. This is an example of a map song, in which the lyrics contain codes that denote the locations of various landmarks. The following are the lyrics to the song “Wade in the Water.” Chorus: Children, wade in the water, wade in the water, wade in the water Wade through the water. God is going to cause turmoil in the sea. What is the identity of those children who are all dressed in red?

  • They must be the ones who followed Moses.
  • Chorus What is the identity of those children who are all clothed in white?
  • It has to be the ones belonging to the Israelites.
  • Chorus What is the identity of those children who are all clothed in blue?
  • They must be the ones who made it to the other side.
  • Chorus

Steal Away

This song conveys the message that the person who is singing it is intending to flee. sneak away, steal away, steal away! is the chorus. Is it possible to steal away to Jesus? Slip away, steal away to your own house! I don’t have much time left in this place! My Lord has summoned me! He screams out to me above the thunder! It’s like the trumpet is blowing in my spirit! I don’t have much time left in this place! Chorus My Lord has summoned me! He yells my name because of the illumination! It’s like the trumpet is blowing in my spirit!

Chorus.

Sweet Chariot

According to this song, the one singing it is preparing to flee the country. sneak away, steal away! repeats the chorus. Taking Jesus away from me? Home is where the thief goes. The time is ticking away on me! I’ve been summoned by the Lord! By the thunder, he summons me. Within me, I can hear the trumpet playing. The time is ticking away on me! Chorus I’ve been summoned by the Lord! His lights is what he uses to beckon me! Within me, I can hear the trumpet playing. The time is ticking away on me!

Follow the Drinking Gourd

This song conveys the message that the person who is singing it is preparing to flee. sneak away, steal away, steal away, steal away! Is it okay to steal away to Jesus? Take off, take off for home! I don’t have much longer to spend in this place! I’ve been summoned by my Lord! He summons me with the thunder! I can hear it in my spirit like a trumpet! I don’t have much longer to spend in this place! Chorus I’ve been summoned by my Lord! He recognizes me by the light! I can hear it in my spirit like a trumpet!

Chorus.

Songs of the African American Civil Rights Movement

This song conveys the message that the person who is singing it intends to flee. Steal away, steal away, steal away! Steal away to Jesus, perhaps? Steal away, steal away to your home! I don’t have much longer to spend here!

My Lord has called me! He summons me by the thunder! I can feel the trumpet blowing in my spirit! I don’t have much longer to spend here! Chorus My Lord has called me! He recognizes me by the brightness! I can feel the trumpet blowing in my spirit! I don’t have much longer to spend here! Chorus.

African American Spirituals

Harriet Tubman is seen in a full-length picture, her hands resting on the back of a chair. A reproduction of this image is available from the Prints and Photographs Division under the Reproduction Number LC-USZ62-7816. She said that she used spirituals such as “Go Down Moses” to alert slaves that she was in the area and would assist those who wished to escape. Tubman was a former slave who worked as a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War. When it comes to religious folk music, aspiritual is most strongly connected with the slavery of African Americans in the American South during the 19th century.

  1. The African American spiritual (also known as the Negro Spiritual) is one of the most prominent and widespread kinds of American folk music, accounting for almost a quarter of all American folk song.
  2. Another is ” Deep down in my heart.” According to the King James Bible translation ofEphesians 5:19, “Speaking to yourself in psalms and hymns and spiritual melodies, singing and making music in your heart to the Lord,” the term “spiritual” is derived.
  3. Participants in the gatherings would sing, chant, dance, and even enter euphoric trances during the sessions.
  4. ” Jesus Leads Me All the Way,” performed by Reverend Goodwin and the Zion MethodistChurch congregation in 1970 and recorded by Henrietta Yurchenco, is an example of a spiritual sung in this way.
  5. Music had long been a key part of people’s lives throughout Africa, with music-making permeating both big life events and everyday activities.
  6. The gatherings were thus frequently prohibited and had to be held in secret.
  7. It took a long time for the religion to gain widespread acceptance at initially.

Spirituals were increasingly important as Africanized Christianity gained traction among the slave population, serving as a means of expressing the community’s newfound faith, as well as its sufferings and hopes.

The vocal style was characterized by a plethora of freeform slides, twists, and rhythms, which made it difficult for early spiritual publishers to adequately capture.

The difficulties of slaves are described in songs such as “Sometimes I feel like a motherlesschild,” and “Nobody knows de sorrow I’ve seen,” which identify the suffering of Jesus Christ.

They are referred to as “jubilees” or “camp meetingsongs” because they are rapid, rhythmic, and frequently syncopated.

Spirituals are also frequently referred to as formalized protest songs, with songs such as ” Steal away to Jesus,” created by Wallis Willis, being interpreted as calls to emancipation from slavery by some critics and historians.

Because aiding slaves in their quest for freedom was against the law, hard proof is difficult to come across.

As Frederick Douglass, abolitionist author and former slave in the nineteenth century, wrote in his bookMy Bondage and My Freedom(1855) about his experiences singing spirituals while he was held in bondage: “If someone had been paying attention, they might have noticed something more than a desire to reach heaven in our repeated singing of ‘O Canaan, sweet Canaan, I am bound for the land of Canaan.’ We wanted to get to the North, and the North was Canaan, the land of Israel.” Featured image courtesy of Fisk University’s Prints and Photographs Division, Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-11008 and the Jubilee Singers of Nashville, Tenn.

  • The Fisk University Jubilee Singers, under the leadership of JohnW.
  • Between 1870 and 1880, a photograph was taken.
  • The formation of the Jubilee Singers, a chorus comprised of freed slaves from Fisk University in Nashville, Tennessee, in the 1870s ignited a worldwide interest in the musical style, which has continued to this day.
  • While some African Americans at the time connected the spiritual tradition with slavery and were uninterested in its continuation, the concerts of the Fisk Universitysingers persuaded many that it should be perpetuated.
  • The Hampton Singers of Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) in Hampton, Virginia, were one of the first groups to challenge the Jubilee Singers in terms of quality and quantity.
  • Nathaniel Dett.
  • As noted composers Moses Hogan, Roland Carter, Jester Hairston, Brazeal Dennard and Wendell Whalum have arranged spirituals for choruses, the musical form has evolved beyond its traditional folk song roots in the twentieth century.

A significant contribution to the development of spirituals on the concert hall stage has been the work of composers such as Henry T.

Follow the link to get the sheet music for ” A Balm inGiliad,” a spiritual prepared by Burleigh that is an example of his work.

In Burleigh’s footsteps were many more composers who followed in his footsteps.

The practice has persisted into more modern times, with classical performers like as Kathleen Battle and Jessye Norman regularly include spirituals in their concerts and recording sessions.

A great number of spirituals have been retained in the Gospel heritage, but their musical forms have altered considerably as harmonies have been added and the songs have been rearranged to fit new performing styles.

The classic spiritual, despite these modifications, is still alive and well in some conservative churches in the South that are either more insulated from modern influences, or that just choose to keep the older tunes alive for historical reasons.

There are some real hidden gems in this collection, including “Run old Jeremiah,” a ring shout from Jennings, Alabama, recorded by J.

Brown and A.

Simon’s Island, Georgia, in 1959.

This audio contains a conversation between folklorist Stephen Winick and a curator about the song “Kumbaya.” Even though it is significantly less widely known than its “negrospiritual” cousin, the “white spiritual” genre contains the folk song, the religious ballad, and the camp-meeting spiritual, among other things.

  1. This field recording was made in 1943 by Willis James of the Lincoln Park Singers performing “I’ll fly away,” a song written by Albert E.
  2. This field recording serves to demonstrate the connection that exists between black and white spirituals in general.
  3. A series of research began with this book, which revealed the presence of white spirituals in both their oral and documented forms, with the latter being found in the shape-note tune books of rural communities.
  4. In black spiritual performances, differences include the use of microtonally flattened notes, syncopation, and counter-rhythms marked by handclapping, among other things.
  5. Throughout the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, spirituals have played a key role as vehicles for social protest at various moments throughout history.
  6. “Oh, Liberation!
  7. A live performance of both of these songs was captured on camera by the ensemble Reverb at a concert at the Library of Congress in 2007.

While creating new protest songs, some of today’s most well-known pop artists continue to draw on the spirituals tradition as inspiration. A few of examples include Bob Marley’s “RedemptionSong,” as well as Billy Bragg’s “Sing their souls back home.”

Note

  • Among the works of Sarah H. Bradford is Harriet Tubman: The Moses of Her People, published in 1886. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill makes this resource available online.

Resources

  • ” African American Song,” (Songs of America)
  • ” African American Gospel,” (Songs of America)
  • ” African American Song,” (Songs of America)
  • University of Denver’s SweetChariot: The Story of the Spirituals is a must-read. Hansonia Caldwell, Hansonia Caldwell African American Music: Spirituals (third edition, Culver City, California: IkoroCommunications, Inc. 2003)
  • Ellen Koskoff, ed. African American Music: Spirituals (third edition, Culver City, California: IkoroCommunications, Inc. 2003)
  • The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music Volume 3: The United States and Canada (New York and London: Garland Publishing, 2001) pp 624-629
  • Also pp523-524, pp68-69
  • Hitchcock, H. Wiley, and Stanley Sadie, The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music Volume 3: The United States and Canada (New York and London: Garland Publishing, 2001). The New GroveDictionary of Music and Musicians (London: Macmillan, 1986), pages. 284-290
  • The New GroveDictionary of Music and Musicians (London: Macmillan, 1986), pp. 284-290
  • Many examples of digital recordings and sheet music of spirituals may be found on the Library of Congress online portal’s Performing Arts Encyclopedia. The Performing Arts Encyclopedia also contains a special digitized American choralmusic collection, which includes arrangements of spirituals by composers such as Henry T Burleigh and R Nathaniel Dett
  • ” Songs of the African American Civil Rights Movement,” (Songs of America)
  • ” Songs Related to the Abolition of Slavery,” (Songs of America)
  • And ” Songs of the African American Civil Rights Movement,”
See also:  How Was The Underground Railroad Made? (Solution)

Digital History

Portrait of an African American child, Eatonville, Fla.; A Methodist church, Eatonville, Fla.; Portrait of a man holding a hat; Portrait of Rev. Haynes, Eatonville, Fla. June, 1935. Lomax collection of photographs depicting folk musicians, primarily in the southern United States and the Bahamas. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Harriet Tubman’s Code Spirituals played an important role for fugitive slaves who sometimes used them as a secret code. One example is illustrated by several episodes in the life of Harriet Tubman as recounted inHarriet, the Moses of Her People, a 19th-century biography by Sarah Bradford based on interviews with this most famous conductor on the Underground Railroad, which is available at the Documenting the American South website.Harriet, the Moses of Her Peopleby Sarah H. Bradford. New York: Published for the author by Geo. R. Lockwood and Son, 1886.Read the account of Harriet’s own escape from slavery (pages 26-28 in the electronic text), where she uses a spiritual to let her fellow slaves know about her secret plans:she must first give some intimation of her purpose to the friends she was to leave behind, so that even if not understood at the time, it might be remembered afterward as her intended farewell. Slaves must not be seen talking together, and so it came about that their communication was often made by singing, and the words of their familiar hymns, telling of the heavenly journey, and the land of Canaan, while they did not attract the attention of the masters, conveyed to their brethren and sisters in bondage something more than met the ear. And so she sang, accompanying the words, when for a moment unwatched, with a meaning look to one and another:
“When dat ar ole chariot comes, I’m gwine to lebe you, I’m boun’ for de promised land, Frien’s, I’m gwine to lebe you.” Again, as she passed the doors of the different cabins, she lifted up her well-known voice; and many a dusky face appeared at door or window, with a wondering or scared expression; and thus she continued:”I’m sorry, frien’s, to lebe you, Farewell! oh, farewell! But I’ll meet you in de mornin’, Farewell! oh, farewell!”I’ll meet you in de mornin’, When you reach de promised land; On de oder side of Jordan, For I’m boun’ for de promised land.”

Consider the following questions:

  • Describe the type of leave-taking this song is about when it is performed as a hymn as a component of a religious worship service. Was there a concealed message that Harriet was conveying to her pals through the song? What is the link between these two levels of meaning – one meaning derived from Harriet, and another meaning derived from the church
  • What does Harriet’s flight resemble in terms of “going away” from the perspective of people she will leave behind
  • What role does the song play in creating a link that will keep her connected to her friends even after she has passed away?

Harriet leans on the spiritual’s ability to bring people together in order to give her departure religious and social importance, and she does it with grace. It is in this song that she acknowledges her place in the slave community while also declaring that she intends to flee from it, and it is in this song that she expresses the twofold trust in redemption that will support her on her journey. When Harriet is bringing additional slaves to escape in a later episode (pages 37-38), she utilizes a spiritual to comfort them that they had evaded a gang of slave hunters and that they would be safe.

There was an extensive search of the woods in all directions, every home was visited, and every resident was stopped and questioned about a gang of black fugitives who had been reported to be escaping through that portion of the country at the time of the search.

They had been without food for a long time and were on the verge of starvation; nevertheless, since the pursuers appeared to have dispersed, Harriet decided to make an effort to reach a specific “station of the underground railroad” that she was familiar with in order to get food for her hungry company.

  • How long will she be gone?
  • Listen up!
  • In addition, here are the lyrics of the invisible singer, which, I wish I could share with you because I have heard her sing them so many times: “Hail, oh hail, ye cheerful spirits,” I say.
  • Neither grief nor sorrow, neither agony nor misery, I’m not going to bother you any longer.

‘Jesus, Jesus will accompany you, and He will lead you to his throne; He who died has gone before you, and you will not walk alone through the wine press.’ God, whose rumbling thunders shake creation, God, who commands the planets to roll, God, who rides atop the tempest, and God, whose scepter moves the entire universe The route is dark and thorny, and the traveler must go carefully; yet beyond the valley of grief, there are the fields of infinite days.

  • When I heard these words, the air performed to accompany them was so wild, so full of mournful minor notes and unexpected quavers, that I would challenge any white person to master it, and every time I heard it, it was a continuous source of astonishment to me.
  • She is accompanied by her followers.
  • Oh, go down, Moses, all the way down into Egypt’s country, and tell old Pharaoh, “Allow my people to leave!” You may be able to impede my progress below, but you will not be able to do so up dere.
  • All the way down into Egypt’s territory, Please tell old Pharaoh that my people must be let to leave.
  • They emerge one by one from their hiding locations, where they are fed and refueled in preparation for another night on the road.
  • Consider the following questions:
  • Using the spiritual’s ability to bring people together, Harriet infuses spiritual importance into her departure, which is both religious and socially significant. Her song reinforces her place in the slave society, even as she professes her determination to leave it, and at the same time expresses the twofold confidence in redemption that will sustain her as she travels along the road to freedom. The use of a spiritual to convince other slaves that they had evaded a group of slave hunters occurs later in the story (pages 37-38), when Harriet is leading them to liberation from captivity. An intense and close-range pursuit took place at one point. There was an extensive search of the woods in all directions, every home was visited, and every individual was stopped and questioned about a gang of black fugitives who had been reported to be escaping through that portion of the country at the time. Harriet had a huge group of people with her at the time
  • The children were sleeping soundly, thanks to the opium, but the rest of the company was on high alert, each one hiding behind his own tree and as silent as death while they waited for Harriet to arrive. After a long period of time without food, Harriet and her companions were on the verge of starvation. As the pursuers appeared to have abandoned their pursuit, Harriet made the decision to attempt to reach a specific “station of the underground railroad” that she was familiar with in order to obtain food for her starving party. As she walked away from the gathering in the woods, they cowered and trembled, as if a fluttering leaf or the movement of an animal were a terrifying sound that sent their hearts into their throats. She had left them under cover of night, leaving them with nothing except their memories. She hasn’t returned for how long? Has she been apprehended and taken away, and if so, what will happen to her and her companions. It’s time to pay attention! There’s a faint sound of singing in the distance, getting closer. Also, here are the lyrics of the unseen singer, which I would want to be able to offer you because I have heard her sing them so many times: “Hail to thee, oh hail, ye cheerful spirits, ” Your dread of death will be eliminated. Pain or suffering are not the result of grief or sadness. No longer will I cause you any trouble henceforth.” Thousands of angels surround Him, constantly ready to fulfill His commands
  • They hover above you at all times, until you enter the celestial kingdom. ‘Jesus, Jesus will accompany you, and he will lead you to his throne
  • He who died has gone before you, and he has trod de wine-press all by himself.’ God, whose rumbling thunders shake creation, God, who commands the planets to spin, God, who rides atop the tempest, and God, whose scepter moves the entire universe But beyond this valley of grief, there are fields of unending days
  • The route is dark and thorny
  • And the traveler must go carefully. To learn it, I would challenge any white person to learn it because the air that was sang to these lines was so wild and full of mournful minor notes and unexpected quavers that it would be a continual surprise to me no matter how many times I heard it. When she has passed up and down the road, checking to see if the coast is clear, and then to reassure her people that it is their leader who is approaching, she breaks into the plaintive strains of a song that was forbidden to her people in the South, but which she and her followers enjoy singing together: “Oh go down, Moses, way down into Egypt’s land, Tell old Pharaoh, Let my people go.” Oh Pharaoh said he would cross the river
  • Let my people leave
  • And don’t get lost in the desert
  • Let my people go. Oh, Moses, descend into Egypt’s territory, and tell old Pharaoh to release my people. Even if you try, you won’t be able to go up there. My folks should be allowed to leave the country. ‘Let my people go!’ he says as he sits in de Hebben, responding to prayer. Moses, please come down. The journey took us far into Egypt’s territory. Please tell old Pharaoh that my people must be allowed to depart. Her entrance into the wooded recesses brings hope and comfort to the onlookers who have gathered there in anticipation of something happening. They emerge from their hiding spots one by one, where they are fed and refueled in preparation for another night’s trek. She took her people to what was then known as their land of Canaan, which is now known as the State of New York, by night travel, by signals, by threats, by encouragement, through watchings and fastings, and, I believe, via direct interpositions of Providence and miraculous deliverances. The following are some thoughts to consider:

Music Was The Secret Language Of The Underground Railroad

While in elementary school, we were all taught about the Underground Railroad, which was a network of hidden ways slaves used to escape to freedom from slavery. It continues to be one of the most intriguing examples of bravery and resistance in the history of the United States. In spite of this, many of us have little knowledge of how it truly worked. What was the best technique for escaping slaves to figure out which way to go? What method did people use to communicate across hundreds of miles before the Internet existed?

Because it was prohibited in most southern states to educate slaves to read or write, songs coded with secret messages were used to communicate information about the trip north.

In order to connect with visitors, Harriet Tubman, sometimes known as “Moses,” employed music.

Some historians are doubtful about the origins of these songs and their secret codes because there is no recorded confirmation of their existence or of their hidden codes.

Follow The Drinking Gourd

“When the light returns and the first fowl calls, follow the drinking gourd to the water source. “Follow the drinking gourd to where the elderly guy is waiting to take you to freedom.” ” Follow The Drinking Gourd ” is considered to be one of the greatest examples of a “map song,” as it offers vital information for slaves attempting to elude capture. This poem’s first line refers to the beginning of spring (when the days are longer), which was the finest time to embark on the lengthy trek to the North.

When travelers followed the path of the constellation Polaris (the north star), they had a guide in the night sky that guided them in the direction of freedom and independence.

Wade In The Water

The drinking gourd will be found when the sun returns and the first quail calls. ” “Follow the drinking gourd,” says the elderly guy, who is waiting to take you to safety. ” Follow The Drinking Gourd ” is considered to be one of the greatest examples of a “map song,” as it offers critical information for slaves attempting to elude capture. This poem’s first line refers to the beginning of spring (when the days are longer), which was the perfect time to set off on the lengthy trek to the North.

A night sky roadmap to freedom might be found by following the line of the constellation Polaris (the north star) in the direction of Polaris (the north star).

Swing Low, Sweet Chariot

“Swing low, lovely chariot, coming for to bring me home, Swing low, sweet chariot, coming for to carry me home, Swing low, sweet chariot, coming for to carry me home, Swing low, sweet chariot, coming for to carry me home.” I looked around Jordan and what did I see coming for me to take me home, I don’t know. Coming after me is a group of angels who are determined to bring me home. ” Swing Low, Sweet Chariot ” is thought to be Harriet Tubman’s favorite song, and it is one of the most enduring tunes from this time period.

The Underground Railroad’s directors (sweet chariot) were known to as the “band of angels” since they would soon arrive from the south (swing low) to escort slaves up the railroad to freedom (carry me home).

Underground Music Today

While many of these songs are still well-known folk melodies today, others have fallen into obscurity as time has passed. John Legend, executive producer of WGN America’s “Underground,” is working to change that by re-recording African American folk music for a modern audience, according to the network. “Underground” combines spiritual melodies such as “Move, Daniel” and “I Got Shoes” with new music by Kanye West and The Weeknd in order to elicit a sense of resistance from the listener. John Legend is currently working on original music for the film ‘Underground.’ “I thought that all of the songs had to have a certain rawness to it,” Legend explained.

As the songs of the Underground Railroad continue to have an impact on contemporary music, we are reminded that the challenges of 1857 are not unlike from those of 2017.

THE SECRET LIFE OF THE BLACK LAWN JOCKEY

Following the drinking gourd is a good idea. Follow the path of the drinking gourd. Because the elderly guy is standing by, ready to transport you to freedom. If you go the path of the drinking gourd. The drinking gourd will be found when it is light again and the first quail calls. The sight of a black lawn jockey makes the majority of people cringe. Despite the fact that they are only occasionally seen nowadays, yard ornaments depicting blacks in subservient roles have the ability to gnaw insatiably at the spirits of African-Americans while also disgusting those who are unaware of the sneaky and noble role that these “Jockos” played in the first half of the nineteenth century.

  • For example, in the song “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” the lyrics implied that slaves should follow the “drinking gourd,” a nickname for the Big Dipper, which pointed to the North Star and the path to freedom.
  • As historian and author Dr.
  • It was connected to the statue with green ribbons to signal safety and red ribbons to suggest that it should keep going.” “When people view the monument, they have sentiments of embarrassment and outrage because they are unfamiliar with the jockey’s background,” he continues.
  • Occasionally, says Blockson, a flag was placed in the statue’s right hand to signal that the statue was safe.
  • Even while it is difficult to hunt down older cast-iron and concrete sculptures in various poses, such as jockey or slave clothing, Marchel’le Barber of Martha’s Crib, a Matteson business that specializes in African-American memorabilia, says they are not impossible to come across.
  • Collectors of antiquities that depict African-Americans in a bad light are not typically displayed in antiques stores, which makes sense.
  • That’s how she came across a 70-year-old jockey at an antiques store in Chesterton, Indiana.
  • “The greatest way to comprehend our history and our pictures is to educate ourselves about them,” says Barber, who runs a company that sells tiny jockey replicas.
  • from people who are familiar with the history of these monuments and believe that having them is significant not just as a financial investment but also as an investment in African-American history.
  • In the lobby of Temple University’s Sullivan Hall, a groomsman sits watch, occasionally catching people off guard with his presence.

It was at a Greenwich Village market that he discovered the statue, a 5-foot-tall replica of an African-American youngster from the mid-1800s that he acquired in 1984 while working on his National Geographic magazine article “Escape from Slavery.” However, as Blockson points out, “after they read the description at the bottom of the page, their expression of perplexity begins to shift.” Another groomsman statue makes an unexpected cameo in one of Beverly Jenkins’ romance books, “Indigo,” which may be purchased for $5.50 from Avon Books.

  • When the main character notices a lamp in the hands of the antagonist, he realizes he has found freedom and love.
  • Although the 46-year-old writer does not collect monuments, he believes that utilizing African-American history as a backdrop to teach others is an effective method of doing so.
  • However, it is well known that the groomsman, the forerunner of the jockey, was born in the Old South.
  • After World War II, the groomsman developed into the jockey image that is now well recognized as a national symbol.

Goings writes that residents of new housing developments “began placing ‘Jocko’ on their lawns in great numbers, perhaps to give themselves more of a sense of permanence, or perhaps to give themselves more of a sense of belonging to the privileged master class.” A peek across the road, says Jenkins, who lives in a rural part of southeastern Michigan, reveals one of the ancient designs, and a journey around rural America reveals other examples of the style.

  • Blockson claims that he has also seen the jockey monuments in other places of the world, including the United States.
  • “There’s a spirituality to the road that was traveled to lead African-Americans to freedom,” says Blockson of the journey that brought them to independence.
  • It’s right in front of you.
  • The type of stuff where you either feel it or don’t.” he says.
  • Gibb (Collectors Books, $19.95);”Black Collectibles: Mammy and Her Friends,” by Jackie Young (Schiffer Publishing Inc., $14.95 – One such resource is the Black Memorabilia Collectors’ Association, which may be found at 2482 Devoe Ter, Bronx, New York 10468 and can be reached at 212-946-1281.
  • According to historian Kenneth W.
  • Washington desired to launch an attack on a British encampment.
  • According to Goings, a little African-American called Tom Graves expressed an interest in fighting, but Washington determined that he was too young and instead assigned the kid to carry a light for the men as they crossed the Delaware River.

When the troops returned, instead of finding their horses tied to a post, they discovered that Graves had frozen to death and had taken the reins. Goings claims that President Washington was impressed by the boy’s commitment and ordered a statue to be erected in his honor.

The Eerie Truth of the Underground Railroad – Free Essay Example

When we talk about the Underground Railroad, it usually brings up a lot of extremely controversial points of view from all across the world, which is understandable. The Underground Railroad was a secret system that was put in place to assist fugitive slaves on their journey to freedom; being a part of the Underground Railroad was very dangerous and also highly unlawful; being a part of the Underground Railroad was extremely hazardous and also highly illegal; (Eiu.edu). It ran from 1861 to 1865 and was quite loosely structured, considering the large number of individuals it assisted during that time period (Underground Railroad).

  • When individuals first learned about the Underground Railroad, some were thrilled and eager to assist in any way they could, while others were horrified and believed it was immoral and wrong.
  • The majority of white males would use slaves in their daily life, and they would subject their slaves to physically and mentally grueling labor.
  • This all ties back to the reason why Southerners were opposed to the Underground Railroad: when their slaves fled, they lost a lot of money.
  • When the slave owners sought to reclaim their escaped slaves, the financial situation deteriorated further.
  • The primary reason her owner desired her return was because Tubman was a significant contributor to the recent drop in the number of slaves employed by the railroad (Harriet Tubman).
  • All of this has a connection to the Dred Scott Decision.
  • In 1857, the United States formally brought the Dred Scott case into play, which would uphold the right of slave owners to transport their slaves wherever they want at any time of day or night (Urofsky).

Given his strong personality, Scott attempted to purchase his family, who was still oppressed, from their situation of servitude.

Also revealed was how slaves were still seen as property, and how Southerners became enraged when they were treated as individuals.

When they needed to move about or transfer their slaves, they utilized code names.

Another important aspect of the Underground Railroad would be the perilous escape to the surface of the earth since you can’t stay underground indefinitely.

Individuals’ ability to comprehend the critical code phrases was critical since their lives were at danger if they did not.

A song they used to communicate was called “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot, coming for to carry me home,” and it signaled the presence of an Underground Railroad conductor in the vicinity as well as the impending arrival of an escape (Altman).

When slaves walked in rivers and streams, they were commanded to leave no trace of their presence, so that the dogs tracking them would not be able to pick up on their scent.

Here are some examples of other code words that may have been used, but which weren’t as important as the others: Tickets; this indicated that slaves were traveling on the railroad, Stockholders; financial supporters who donated to the railroad, Heaven or Promised Land; Canada and the northern free states, and the Drinking Gourd; the Big Dipper constellation—a constellation which pointed to the North Star While many codes and words were used to assist people through the Underground Railroad, it is the people who are the primary source of assistance (Walls).

When the Underground Railroad is discussed, Harriet Tubman is almost always the first person who comes to mind as a name to remember.

To begin with, Harriet Tubman had no knowledge of geography other than the fact that she understood how to recognize the Big Dipper; she had no knowledge of how to use a compass accurately or even how to read a simple map correctly (Paulson).

One of the most important aspects of Harriet Tubman’s mission is that she embarked on her journey entirely on her own initiative.

We would then go on to the next key individual, who would be identified as Frederick Douglass.

After that, he continued to advocate for equality and human rights until his death in 1895.

John Fairfield is the final major individual in the Underground Railroad who deserves to be mentioned.

After that, people began to pay Fairfield to assist them in their escapes, and he is now known to have assisted more than 1,000 slaves in their escapes from slavery through the Underground Railroad; many other names for him would refer to him as a slave trader or a peddler (History.com).

While conductors, along with Harriet Tubman, assisted in the emancipation of tens of thousands of slaves, southerners at the time were strongly opposed to anything that included the Underground Railroad and its passengers.

Next time you hear someone mention the Underground Railroad, remember all of the difficulties that enslaved people went through in order to gain their freedom, and perhaps share this wonderful tale with someone else so that it can be passed on for future generations.

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