What Year Did Harriet Lead The Underground Railroad? (TOP 5 Tips)

Between 1850 and 1860, Tubman made 19 trips from the South to the North following the network known as the Underground Railroad. She guided more than 300 people, including her parents and several siblings, from slavery to freedom, earning the nickname “Moses” for her leadership.

Who started the Underground Railroad in 1850?

Quaker Abolitionists In the early 1800s, Quaker abolitionist Isaac T. Hopper set up a network in Philadelphia that helped enslaved people on the run.

How many years did Harriet Tubman run the Underground Railroad?

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the most well-known of all the Underground Railroad’s “conductors.” During a ten-year span she made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom. And, as she once proudly pointed out to Frederick Douglass, in all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.”

What age did Harriet Tubman escape slavery?

By age five, Tubman’s owners rented her out to neighbors as a domestic servant. Early signs of her resistance to slavery and its abuses came at age twelve when she intervened to keep her master from beating an enslaved man who tried to escape.

What timeline was the Underground Railroad?

Timeline Description: The Underground Railroad ( 1790s to 1860s ) was a linked network of individuals willing and able to help fugitive slaves escape to safety. They hid individuals in cellars, basements and barns, provided food and supplies, and helped to move escaped slaves from place to place.

Does the Underground Railroad still exist?

It includes four buildings, two of which were used by Harriet Tubman. Ashtabula County had over thirty known Underground Railroad stations, or safehouses, and many more conductors. Nearly two-thirds of those sites still stand today.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

Is Gertie Davis died?

Born into slavery, Harriet Tubman escaped to freedom in the North in 1849 and then risked her life to lead other enslaved people to freedom.

How old would Harriet Tubman be today?

Harriet Tubman’s exact age would be 201 years 10 months 28 days old if alive. Total 73,747 days. Harriet Tubman was a social life and political activist known for her difficult life and plenty of work directed on promoting the ideas of slavery abolishment.

Did Harriet Tubman have epilepsy?

Her mission was getting as many men, women and children out of bondage into freedom. When Tubman was a teenager, she acquired a traumatic brain injury when a slave owner struck her in the head. This resulted in her developing epileptic seizures and hypersomnia.

How many slaves did Jefferson own?

Despite working tirelessly to establish a new nation founded upon principles of freedom and egalitarianism, Jefferson owned over 600 enslaved people during his lifetime, the most of any U.S. president.

Where did Harriet Tubman take the slaves?

Who was Harriet Tubman? Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery in the South to become a leading abolitionist before the American Civil War. She led hundreds of enslaved people to freedom in the North along the route of the Underground Railroad.

What did Isaac Hopper do for the Underground Railroad?

Anti-slavery sentiment was particularly prominent in Philadelphia, where Isaac Hopper, a convert to Quakerism, established what one author called “the first operating cell of the abolitionist underground.” In addition to hiding runaways in his own home, Hopper organized a network of safe havens and cultivated a web of

How many slaves were freed from the Underground Railroad?

The total number of runaways who used the Underground Railroad to escape to freedom is not known, but some estimates exceed 100,000 freed slaves during the antebellum period. Those involved in the Underground Railroad used code words to maintain anonymity.

What happened during the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. Involvement with the Underground Railroad was not only dangerous, but it was also illegal. The safe houses used as hiding places along the lines of the Underground Railroad were called stations.

Harriet Tubman: 8 Facts About the Daring Abolitionist

Originally published in History Revealed in January 2017, this piece is reprinted with permission.

Harriet Tubman

Frequently Asked Questions

Who was Harriet Tubman?

Some of the most common inquiries

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the most well-known of all the Underground Railroad’s “conductors.” During a ten-year span she made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom. And, as she once proudly pointed out to Frederick Douglass, in all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.” Tubman was born a slave in Maryland’s Dorchester County around 1820. At age five or six, she began to work as a house servant. Seven years later she was sent to work in the fields. While she was still in her early teens, she suffered an injury that would follow her for the rest of her life. Always ready to stand up for someone else, Tubman blocked a doorway to protect another field hand from an angry overseer. The overseer picked up and threw a two-pound weight at the field hand. It fell short, striking Tubman on the head. She never fully recovered from the blow, which subjected her to spells in which she would fall into a deep sleep.Around 1844 she married a free black named John Tubman and took his last name. (She was born Araminta Ross; she later changed her first name to Harriet, after her mother.) In 1849, in fear that she, along with the other slaves on the plantation, was to be sold, Tubman resolved to run away. She set out one night on foot. With some assistance from a friendly white woman, Tubman was on her way. She followed the North Star by night, making her way to Pennsylvania and soon after to Philadelphia, where she found work and saved her money. The following year she returned to Maryland and escorted her sister and her sister’s two children to freedom. She made the dangerous trip back to the South soon after to rescue her brother and two other men. On her third return, she went after her husband, only to find he had taken another wife. Undeterred, she found other slaves seeking freedom and escorted them to the North.Tubman returned to the South again and again. She devised clever techniques that helped make her “forays” successful, including using the master’s horse and buggy for the first leg of the journey; leaving on a Saturday night, since runaway notices couldn’t be placed in newspapers until Monday morning; turning about and heading south if she encountered possible slave hunters; and carrying a drug to use on a baby if its crying might put the fugitives in danger. Tubman even carried a gun which she used to threaten the fugitives if they became too tired or decided to turn back, telling them, “You’ll be free or die.”By 1856, Tubman’s capture would have brought a $40,000 reward from the South. On one occasion, she overheard some men reading her wanted poster, which stated that she was illiterate. She promptly pulled out a book and feigned reading it. The ploy was enough to fool the men.Tubman had made the perilous trip to slave country 19 times by 1860, including one especially challenging journey in which she rescued her 70-year-old parents. Of the famed heroine, who became known as “Moses,” Frederick Douglass said, “Excepting John Brown – of sacred memory – I know of no one who has willingly encountered more perils and hardships to serve our enslaved people than.” And John Brown, who conferred with “General Tubman” about his plans to raid Harpers Ferry, once said that she was “one of the bravest persons on this continent.”Becoming friends with the leading abolitionists of the day, Tubman took part in antislavery meetings. On the way to such a meeting in Boston in 1860, in an incident in Troy, New York, she helped a fugitive slave who had been captured.During the Civil War Harriet Tubman worked for the Union as a cook, a nurse, and even a spy. After the war she settled in Auburn, New York, where she would spend the rest of her long life. She died in 1913.Image Credit: Moorland-Spingarn Research Center
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Harriet Tubman Biography

She was known as the “Moses of her people” because she was enslaved and then fled to become a “conductor” of the Underground Railroad, where she assisted others in gaining their freedom. Aside from being a scout, spy, and guerilla fighter for the Union Army during the Civil War, Tubman also worked as a medic for the army. She is widely regarded as the first African-American woman to serve in the United States armed forces. Tubman’s precise birthdate is uncertain, however it is believed to have occurred between 1820 and 1822 in Dorchester County, Maryland, according to some estimations.

  • She had eight siblings, all of whom survived.
  • Early indications of her opposition to slavery and its abuses appeared when she was twelve years old and intervened to prevent her owner from striking an enslaved man who attempted to flee.
  • However, despite the fact that slaves were not permitted to marry, Tubman entered into a marriage partnership with John Tubman, a free black man, in 1844.
  • Tubman did not construct the Underground Railroad, contrary to popular belief; rather, it was built in the late eighteenth century by both black and white abolitionists.
  • The man she married refused to accompany her, and by 1851, he had married a free black lady from the South.
  • As a result of her achievement, slaveowners have offered a $40,000 reward for her arrest or murder.
  • She also took part in various anti-slavery campaigns, including assisting John Brown in his failed attack on the Harpers Ferry arsenal in Virginia in 1859, which she helped organize.

As a spy and scout for the Union army, Tubman frequently disguised herself as an elderly woman.

Tubman assisted a large number of these people in obtaining food, housing, and even employment in the North.

During her time as a nurse, Tubman administered herbal cures to black and white troops who were dying of sickness or illness.

Anthony, looked after her aging parents, and collaborated with white writer Sarah Bradford on her autobiography, which she hoped would be a source of income.

She lived in Auburn, New York, and cared for the elderly in her house.

In 1895, as Davis’s widow (he died in 1888), she was ultimately given a $8 per month military pension, followed by a $20 pension in 1899 for her service in the army.

In 1896, she donated land near her home to the Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged, which is still in operation today. Tuberculosis was discovered in 1913 and Tubman was interred at Fort Hill Cemetery in Auburn, New York, with full military honors.

How Harriet Tubman and William Still Helped the Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad, a network of people who assisted enslaved persons in escaping to the North, was only as strong as the people who were willing to put their own lives in danger to do so. Among those most closely associated with the Underground Railroad were Harriet Tubman, one of the most well-known “conductors,” and William Still, who is generally referred to as the “Father of the Underground Railroad.”

Harriet Tubman escaped slavery and guided others to freedom

Tubman, who was born into slavery in Maryland under the name Araminta Harriet Ross, was able to escape to freedom via the use of the Underground Railroad. Throughout her childhood, she was subjected to constant physical assault and torture as a result of her enslavement. In one of the most serious instances, she was struck in the head with an object weighing two pounds, resulting in her suffering from seizures and narcoleptic episodes for the rest of her life. John Tubman was a free black man when she married him in 1844, but nothing is known about their connection other than the fact that she adopted his last name.

  • Even though she began the voyage with her brothers, she eventually completed the 90-mile journey on her own in 1849.
  • As a result, she crossed the border again in 1850, this time to accompany her niece’s family to Pennsylvania.
  • Instead, she was in charge of a gang of fugitive bond agents.
  • Her parents and siblings were among those she was able to save.
  • Tubman, on the other hand, found a way around the law and directed her Underground Railroad to Canada, where slavery was illegal (there is evidence that one of her destinations on an 1851 voyage was at the house of abolitionist Frederick Douglass).
  • “”I was a conductor on the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say things that other conductors are unable to express,” she stated with a sense of accomplishment.

“I never had a problem with my train going off the tracks or losing a passenger.” Continue reading Harriet Tubman: A Timeline of Her Life, Underground Railroad Service, and Activism for more information.

William Still helped more than 800 enslaved people escape

Meanwhile, William Still was born in Burlington County, New Jersey, a free state, into a life of liberty and opportunity. The purchase of his freedom by his father, Levi Steel, occurred while his mother, Sidney, was on the run from slavery. In his early years, he came to the aid of a friend who was being pursued by enslaved catchers. He was still a child at the time. The Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery hired him in 1844 to work as a janitor and clerk at their Philadelphia offices.

Around this time, he began assisting fleeing enslaved persons by providing them with temporary lodging in the years leading up to the Civil War.

It is claimed that he escorted 800 enslaved persons to freedom over the course of his 14-year career on the route, all while maintaining meticulous records of their journeys.

More about Harriet Tubman’s life of service after the Underground Railroad can be found at this link.

Tubman made regular stops at Still’s station

Tubman was a frequent visitor at Still’s station, since she made a regular stop in Philadelphia on her way to New York. He is also said to have contributed monetarily to several of Tubman’s journeys. Her visits clearly left an effect on him, as evidenced by the inclusion of a section about her in his book, which followed a letter from Thomas Garrett about her ushering in arriving visitors. As Stillwright put it in his book, “Harriet Tubman had become their “Moses,” but not in the same way that Andrew Johnson had been their “Moses of the brown people.” “She had obediently gone down into Egypt and, through her own heroics, had delivered these six bondmen to safety.

But in terms of courage, shrewdness, and selfless efforts to rescue her fellow-men, she was without peer.

“While great anxieties were entertained for her safety, she appeared to be completely free of personal dread,” he went on to say.

will portray William Still, in the upcoming film Harriet. The film will explore the life and spirit of Tubman, and the role that Still had in guiding so many people on the road to freedom.

Harriet Tubman: Conductor on the Underground Railroad

Tubman, who made a regular stop at Still’s station in Philadelphia, was one of his frequent guests. His financial assistance with several of Tubman’s journeys was also revealed. He must have been impressed by her visits since he featured her in a section in his book, which was inspired by a letter from Thomas Garrett about her welcoming newcomers. As Stillwright put it in his book, “Harriet Tubman had become their “Moses,” but not in the same way that Andrew Johnson had been the “Moses of the brown people.” In the end, she had gone down to Egypt on her word, and she had delivered these six bondmen through her own acts of bravery.

  • But in terms of courage, shrewdness, and selfless efforts to liberate her fellow-men, she was without peer.
  • He went on to describe her accomplishments as “amazing,” pointing out that she had made several forays into the danger zone in the process of getting there.
  • It seems that the thought of being abducted by enslaved-hunters or enslaved-holders never crossed her thoughts.” According to all appearances, she was impenetrable.” Cynthia Erivo will portray Harriet Tubman, and Leslie Odom Jr.
  • The film will explore the life and spirit of Tubman, and the role that Still had in guiding so many people down the path to freedom.
  • Tubman was a frequent visitor at Still’s station, since she made regular stops in Philadelphia on her way to and from the city. He is also said to have contributed monetarily to some of Tubman’s travels. And her visits clearly left an impact on him, as evidenced by the fact that he featured her in a chapter in his book, which followed a letter from Thomas Garrett about her bringing in new guests. As Stillwright put it in his book, “Harriet Tubman had become their “Moses,” but not in the sense that Andrew Johnson had been their “Moses of the colored people.” “She had diligently gone down into Egypt and, through her own heroics, had liberated these six bondmen from their captors. Indeed, among the most unfortunate-looking farm laborers in the South, it would be difficult to find a more average example of mankind than Harriet. But in terms of courage, shrewdness, and selfless efforts to save her fellow-men, she was without peer. She did this by making personal trips to Maryland among the slaves, and by doing so she was without peer.” He went on to praise her accomplishments as “amazing,” adding that she had made several forays into the danger zone. “While great concerns were expressed for her safety, she appeared to be completely free of personal anxiety,” he stated. “The thought of being caught by enslaved-hunters or enslaved-holders never occurred to her.” She appeared to be impenetrable to any and all foes.” Cynthia Erivo will portray Harriet Tubman, and Leslie Odom Jr. will portray William Still, in the upcoming film Harriet. The film will explore the life and spirit of Tubman, and the role that Still had in guiding so many people on the path to liberation.
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A frequent visitor to Still’s station was Tubman, who made several stops at the station on her way to and from Philadelphia. He also apparently contributed monetarily to several of Tubman’s journeys. And her visits clearly left an impact on him, as evidenced by the fact that he mentioned her in a paragraph in his book following a letter from Thomas Garrett about her bringing in arriving visitors. “Harriet Tubman had become their ‘Moses,’ but not in the way that Andrew Johnson had been the ‘Moses of the colored people,'” Stillwright writes in his book.

Harriet was a lady with no pretensions; in fact, a more average example of mankind could hardly be found among the most unfortunate-looking farm laborers of the South.

“While great anxieties were entertained for her safety, she appeared to be completely free of personal dread,” he stated.

“She appeared to be impenetrable to all foes.” The 2019 film Harriet, in which Cynthia Erivo portrays Harriet Tubman and Leslie Odom Jr.

portrays William Still, will delve into the life and spirit of Tubman — as well as the role that Still played as they both guided so many people on the road to freedom.

Aboard the Underground Railroad- Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged

Images of the Harriet Tubman Home for theAged, Harriet TubmanNationalHistoric Landmarks photographs
Harriet Tubman (1822-1913), a renowned leader in the UndergroundRailroad movement, established the Home for the Aged in 1908. Born into slaveryin Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman gained her freedom in 1849 when she escapedto Philadelphia. In Philadelphia, Tubman made connections and found support among other white and black abolitionists. Although Harriet Tubman found her freedom, she was separated from her family. Between 1850 and 1860, Tubman returned to the Eastern Shore of Maryland 13 times and freed more than 70 people, who were her family and friends so they can all be free together as a family.Maryland planters offered a $100 rewardfor Tubman’s capture at one point during her time as an Underground Railroad conductor.Active during the Civil War, Tubman assisted the Union Army as a spy, nurse, cook,and guide. From Port Royal, South Carolina, in June of 1863, she aided a detachmentof 150 African Americans in a raid up the Combahee River, destroying Confederatemines, storehouses and crops, and liberating about 800 slaves.Dedicating herlife after the Civil War to helping former slaves, especially children and theelderly, Tubman also became active in the women’s rights movement and the AMEZion Church. In 1859 Tubman contracted for seven acres of land and a house from Governor William H. Seward in Auburn, New York, for which she had lenient terms of repayment. It was to this property that she broughther parents after their intial stay in Canada, and where they stayed while shewas assisting Union troops during the Civil War. After the war she returned toher home in Auburn and began what was to be her life-long work of caring for agedand indigent African Americans. She supported the construction of the Thompson AME Zion Church in 1891. In1896, Harriet purchased 25 adjoining acres to her home on which stood the buildingnow known as the Home for Aged. Here she struggled to care for her charges, andin 1903 deeded the property to the AME Zion Church with the understanding thatthe church would continue to run the Home. Tubman continued to live at her home,until her own health deterioted and she was cared for at the Home for the Aged.She died there in 1913 at the age of 92 or 93 and was laid in state at the ThompsonAME Zion Church. Though not directly associated with Tubman’s activities with the UndergroundRailroad, these properties, designated a National Historic Landmark, are a tangiblelink to this brave and remarkable woman who is known as “the Moses of herpeople.”TheHarriet Tubman Home for the Agedis located at 180 South St., herhome is located at 182 South St., and the church is located at 33 Parker St.in Auburn, New York. The Home for the Aged and Tubman’s home are owned by theAME Zion Church, the Home for the Aged is open to the public by appointment (visitfor more information).The Thompson AME Zion Church is currently closed and undergoing a historic structure study and report. The Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged is a partner park. Also of interest,The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Parkis located in MarylandPrevious |List of Sites|Home|Next

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubmandanielled65142021-05-05T Harriet Tubmandanielled65142021-05-05 10:05:50-04:00 As part of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, visitors can learn about the life and times of Harriet Tubman – freedom seeker and Underground Railroad conductor, abolitionist and suffragist, human rights activist, and one of Maryland’s most famous daughters – as well as other notable figures from the state’s history.

Tubman, who was born about 1822 in Dorchester County on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, is one of the most praised, known, and beloved persons in the history of the United States of America.

If this is the case, Harriet Tubman would become the first woman and the first African-American to be featured on U.S.

A courageous leader

Harriet Tubman was the middle child of nine enslaved siblings, and she was reared by parents who had to fight against overwhelming difficulties to keep their family together. In spite of her terrible impairment, she grew up to become an accomplished hunter, lumberjack, and fieldworker. Her athletic skills prepared her for the potentially hazardous road she would choose as an adult. Tubman was able to make it to Philadelphia in 1849 after a daring escape. Once free, she went on to become an operator of the Underground Railroad, a hidden network of people, places, and routes that gave sanctuary and support to fugitive slaves during the American Civil War.

By 1860, Tubman had gained the moniker “Moses” for her work in rescuing so many enslaved people while putting her own life in danger to do it.

Did youknow?

  • When Harriet Tubman was born, she was the middle child of nine enslaved siblings, and she was nurtured by parents who battled against overwhelming difficulties to keep their family together. A serious impairment did not stop her from becoming an adept hunter, lumberjack, and fieldworker after years of hard effort. It prepared her for the potentially hazardous road she would choose as an adult. It was in 1849 when Tubman was able to make his way from New York to Philadelphia. The Underground Railroad — a hidden network of people, places, and routes that gave sanctuary and support to fleeing slaves — was established by her when she was freed from slavery. Over the course of a decade, she bravely returned to Maryland at least 13 times to rescue her parents, siblings, family members, and friends, escorting them safely to freedom on each occasion. The epithet “Moses” was given to Tubman by 1860 because she had freed so many enslaved people while putting her own life in danger to do so.
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A dedicated humanitarian

As a result of her widespread admiration among abolitionists in the North, Tubman established herself as a valued friend and counselor to many, earning her a position in the Union Army as a scout, spy, nurse, and confidante of generals. After the Civil War, she relocated to Auburn, New York, where she devoted her time and energy to the misery of the poor, opening her house as a haven for the aged, the sick, and those who were physically handicapped. Even before the American Civil War, she was a tireless advocate for the rights of women, minorities, the crippled, and the elderly in general.

She went on to establish a nursing home for African Americans on her land in New York, which she owned at the time.

Tubman had already been the topic of a slew of articles, recollections, and an autobiography at that point.

It is only necessary to go along the Byway that bears her name to appreciate the significance of her humble origins and the scope of her accomplishment.

Her mission was to help others, combat tyranny, and make a difference in the world – all ideas that are recognized along the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, where ordinary individuals performed incredible feats of bravery.

  • She was born into slavery as Araminta “Minty” Ross in Dorchester County, Maryland, most likely around the year 1822. Her parents, Harriet (“Rit”) Green and Ben Ross, were both enslaved
  • She was born into this situation. A family member of Harriet’s mother’s “ownership,” the Brodess family, rented Harriet out and assigned her to do various jobs, including caring for children, checking muskrat traps, agricultural and forest labor, driving oxen, plowing, and moving logs. During her childhood, most likely in the 1830s, she had a serious brain injury that required surgery. Seizures, migraines, and visions plagued the victim for the rest of his life. Around the time of her marriage to John Tubman, a free Black man, in 1844, she changed her name from Araminta to Harriet, and so became known as Harriet Tubman 1849: She managed to escape slavery and make her way to Philadelphia on her own, primarily through the darkness of the night.
  • Following her emancipation, she spent more than a decade making secret return journeys to Maryland in order to assist her friends and family members who were also fleeing slavery. With each journey, she put her life in danger. Tubman’s last rescue expedition took place in 1860
  • When the Civil War broke out, she joined the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, then as an armed scout and spy, among other roles. With the liberation of more than 700 slaves in 1863, she made history as the first woman to command an armed expedition during the war. The next year she relocated to a home she had acquired in Auburn, New York (where she cared for her aged parents) that she had purchased in 1859. She was active in the suffrage campaign, advocating not just for the rights of women, but also for the rights of minorities, the crippled, and the elderly
  • And On March 10, 1913, she passed away. Tubman is buried in Auburn, New York
  • On April 20, 2016, the United States Treasury Department announced a plan for Tubman to replace Andrew Jackson as the portrait gracing the $20 bill
  • And on April 20, 2016, the United States Treasury Department announced a plan for Tubman to replace Andrew Jackson as the portrait gracing the $20 bill.

Dispelling the myths about Harriet Tubman

Her covert return journeys to Maryland to assist her friends and family in escaping slavery continued for more than a decade after she had fled. Her life was in danger with each journey she took. Tubman’s last rescue attempt took place in 1860, and when the Civil War broke out, she joined the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, then as an armed scout and spy, among other roles. With the liberation of more than 700 slaves in 1863, she made history as the first woman to command an armed expedition in the war.

As part of the suffrage movement, she fought for the rights of women, as well as the rights of minorities, the crippled, and the elderly, among other causes.

The United States Treasury Department announced on April 20, 2016, that Harriet Tubman would replace Andrew Jackson as the picture adorning the $20 dollar; she is buried in Auburn, New York.

Learn Harriet Tubman’s Story at the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center

The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, located in Church Creek on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, first opened its doors to the public in March 2017. Several locations surrounding the visitor center were used by Harriet Tubman during her childhood as a slave in Dorchester County. She lived, worked, and prayed in these locations. The place is where she originally fled slavery, and it is where she returned around 13 times over the course of a decade, risking her life time and time again in order to free over 70 friends and family members.

  1. Located at 4068 Golden Hill Road in Church Creek, Maryland.
  2. Donations are accepted in lieu of admission to the tourist center, which is free.
  3. The magnificent visitor center, which is located near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and about 25 minutes from Cambridge, Maryland, has an exhibit hall with compelling and thought-provoking multimedia exhibits, a theater, and a gift shop, among other amenities.
  4. There is also a huge picnic pavilion with a stone fireplace that may be rented out for special occasions.
  5. In addition to the visitor center, there are more than 30 historical sites along the Maryland part of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, which is a self-guided, beautiful driving tour of the Underground Railroad.
  6. NOTE: The Harriet Tubman Visitor Center is not to be confused with the Harriet Tubman MuseumEducational Center, which has been in operation for more than 20 years and is maintained entirely by volunteers in the heart of Cambridge’s downtown.

The museum’s founders were instrumental in preserving Tubman’s legacy. Visit the Tubman Visitor Center website for additional information, or call or email them at 410-221-2290 or [email protected] to learn more about their programs and services.

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park

It was March 2017 that the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center in Church Creek, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, opened its doors to the general public. Several locations surrounding the visitor center were used by Harriet Tubman during her time as a slave in Dorchester County. She lived, worked, and prayed in these locations. She fled slavery from this place, and over the course of a decade she returned around 13 times, each time risking her life in order to rescue more than 70 of her friends and family members.

Located at 4068 Golden Hill Road in Church Creek, Maryland The most up-to-date information may be found by visiting this link.

410-221-2290 or [email protected] are the best places to get additional information about the Tubman Visitor Center.

In the grounds of a 17-acre state park, there are small walking pathways that lead to the visitor center.

Both the Maryland Park Service and the National Park Service collaborated on the development of the visitor center.

Many of the exhibitions highlight particular locations along the Tubman Byway so you may get a better sense of the tales being shared.

They were instrumental in ensuring that Tubman’s legacy would go on for future generations.

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