What Year Underground Railroad Used To Escape To Freedom To Michigan? (Best solution)

The Underground Railroad consisted of about 3,000 members of various origins and denominations, who by 1861 helped 75,000 people find freedom–many of which escaped through Detroit.

When did the Underground Railroad start in Michigan?

The Underground Railroad existed from the 1830s to the start of the Civil War in 1861. In some cases, freedom seekers traveled thousands of miles on foot. There were several railroad routes leading into Michigan, along with several operators, known as conductors, who aided freedom seekers once they arrived in Michigan.

Was Michigan part of the Underground Railroad?

Conductors on the Underground Railroad helped them find routes and ways to escape to the north. Many towns in southern Michigan were part of the Underground Railroad. Conductors hid fugitives in their homes and barns during the day. The hiding places were called depots.

Where did the Underground Railroad end in Michigan?

Detroit. The last stop along the Underground Railroad in Michigan before freedom seeks made it to Canada was Detroit. Over 50,000 people traveled through Detroit, or “midnight” as it was referred to in the mid 1800s. As such, there are many “stations” and historic sites to check out in Detroit.

What timeline was the Underground Railroad?

Timeline Description: The Underground Railroad ( 1790s to 1860s ) was a linked network of individuals willing and able to help fugitive slaves escape to safety. They hid individuals in cellars, basements and barns, provided food and supplies, and helped to move escaped slaves from place to place.

Did the Underground Railroad go to Detroit?

Until Emancipation, Detroit was a pivotal part of the Underground Railroad, an 1800s network of abolitionists, or “conductors,” who aided enslaved people seeking freedom. Visit them individually or book a group outing, which is just one of the many ways to celebrate Black history in Detroit.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Grand Rapids Michigan?

The underground steam system has been in continuous use in Grand Rapids since the original system began in 1897.

Did slaves escape to Michigan?

The Underground Railroad was not a real railroad; it was the name given to the route of roads and homes used to help slaves escape from their southern masters. Many slaves escaped to the north- ern United States and Canada where they could be free. Many slaves came to Michigan from Kentucky. Escaping was dangerous.

Were there slaves in Michigan?

1787. The Northwest Ordinance makes slavery illegal its territories and states. Although Michigan is part of the Northwest Territory, there are enslaved people living in Michigan until 1837.

Why was Detroit important to the Underground Railroad?

Detroit’s unique geographical location, coupled with its radicalized black community and abolitionist sympathizers made the city a prime crossing location for freedom seekers. Code named “Midnight” by Underground Railroad “conductors,” the city provided access to Canada across the Detroit River.

What states did the Underground Railroad go through?

These were called “stations,” “safe houses,” and “depots.” The people operating them were called “stationmasters.” There were many well-used routes stretching west through Ohio to Indiana and Iowa. Others headed north through Pennsylvania and into New England or through Detroit on their way to Canada.

What year did the Underground Railroad begin and end?

system used by abolitionists between 1800-1865 to help enslaved African Americans escape to free states.

How many slaves were freed from the Underground Railroad?

The total number of runaways who used the Underground Railroad to escape to freedom is not known, but some estimates exceed 100,000 freed slaves during the antebellum period. Those involved in the Underground Railroad used code words to maintain anonymity.

What happened during the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. Involvement with the Underground Railroad was not only dangerous, but it was also illegal. The safe houses used as hiding places along the lines of the Underground Railroad were called stations.

Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad was a hidden network of financial, spiritual, and material assistance for previously enslaved individuals on their journey from plantations in the American South to freedom in Canada that operated from the early 1800s to 1865. Freedom seekers traveled from one town to another on foot, sometimes at night, in order to avoid being apprehended. When they arrived, they were greeted by sympathizers known as “conductors” or “stockholders,” who helped them get settled. Conductors from all walks of life endangered their livelihoods for the sake of human freedom by concealing slaves in their homes, barns, attics, cellars, churches, stores, and sheds, as well as in other places.

They also made it easier to move to the next “stop,” which was an Underground Railroad refuge.

The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 assured that even if “runaway” slaves managed to make their way into free states in the North, they could be apprehended and returned to their owners under certain conditions.

Secrecy was required since, under the same Act, people discovered to be assisting with freedom seekers may face severe fines and possibly imprisonment if they were found to be in the Northern states.

  1. Seymour Finney was a well-known Underground Railroad conductor in the Detroit area.
  2. George DeBaptiste was a prominent abolitionist who was a part of the Detroit abolitionist network.
  3. An established businessman and community leader in Detroit, he managed a barbershop and bakery before acquiring the steamer T.
  4. The African-American Mysteries or the Order of the Men of Oppression, which DeBaptiste founded, collaborated with the Underground Railroad in Detroit and was known as the Order of the Men of Oppression.
  5. The congregation was originally located on Fort Street, but in 1857 it relocated to its current location in Greektown.
  6. Second Baptist Church collaborated with abolitionist pioneers like as Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, and John Brown, among others.
  7. Because it was typically the last destination on the Underground Railroad before attaining freedom, Detroit was one of the most important sites on the Underground Railroad.

It is believed that 200 Underground Railroad stations occurred throughout Michigan between the 1820s and 1865. The Underground Railroad came to an end in 1865, following the end of the Civil War and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, which abolished slavery.

RELATED ITEMS IN THE COLLECTION

View all of the objects that are associated with the Underground Railroad.

Underground Railroad in Kalamazoo — Kalamazoo Public Library

See all of the things that are linked to the Underground Railroad in our collection.

Differing Views

In the early history of Kalamazoo County, the advanced philosophy and liberality of New England can plainly be seen, as seen by the large number of persons who moved here from that part of the country and acquired the detested label of abolitionists. While the early history of most of Kalamazoo’s churches demonstrates a strong anti-slavery sentiment and resistance to slavery, there were still segments of our early immigrants who were outspoken supporters of the institution. Our region mirrored the divergent points of view that eventually pushed our country into the Civil War.

Kalamazoo’s Role

Henry Montague was a British politician who was born in the town of Montague in the county of Suffolk in the United Kingdom. The Underground Railroad was never the nonstop stream of people that many people believe it to have been at one point in time. It was in operation for a total of 20 years, during which time the number of slaves housed here was estimated to be between 1,000 and 1,500, or an average of less than one slave per week. However, it meant that those large numbers of individuals were able to achieve freedom through Kalamazoo County, and the railroad would have been worth the effort even if it had only been for one of those people.

Abolitionists

Two men stand out as early enablers of the railroad: Thomas Edison and John D. Rockefeller. Dr. Nathan M. Thomas, the first practicing physician in this area, established his practice in Prairie Ronde in 1830. He was the county’s first active outspoken abolitionist, and he was also the first to speak out against slavery. Another was Henry Montague, who lived in the 17th century. He began his abolitionist career in Massachusetts before relocating to New York in 1836 to continue his work. The abolitionist settled in Oshtemo and was a delegate to the state’s first abolitionist convention, which took place in Ann Arbor in 1848.

  • They were a guy and his wife who had fled in Alabama and were making their way up the Mississippi River.
  • They were handed over to Hugh M.
  • In Kalamazoo County, this marked the beginning of the Underground Railroad.
  • Nathan M.

Stations

As early facilitators of the railroad, two persons stand out as particularly notable. After settling in Prairie Ronde, Dr. Nathan M. Thomas became the area’s first practicing physician, opening his practice in 1830. Abolitionists hailed him as the county’s first outspoken and active voice. Then there’s Henry Montague. He began his abolitionist career in Massachusetts, and in 1836, he relocated to New York to continue his work. He made his home in Oshtemo and served as a delegate to the state’s first abolitionist convention, which was held in Ann Arbor in 1848.

In Alabama, they’d gotten away with their lives and were making their way north.

They were handed over to Hugh M. Shafter while they were there. The Underground Railroad in Kalamazoo County had its beginnings at that location. Located in Schoolcraft, the Dr. Nathan M. Thomas House has been recognized as a station on the Underground Railroad.

Process

Dr. Thomas’ home in this neighborhood was often where the black fugitives would be rushed inside for a dinner made by Mrs. Thomas, who would arrive about daybreak on a cart in this neighborhood. Then they were brought to the attic where they would have to wait until dusk. After being fed once again, they boarded Thomas’ wagon, which was covered with straw before being taken to another’station,’ which was most likely Battle Creek in Michigan. It was hazardous employment since the fugitives were frequently pursued by slave hunters hired to bring them back to the southern United States.

See also:  What Was The Underground Railroad Used For? (Suits you)

Slave Hunters

This group of slave hunters offered some frightening moments, such as the time a slave was concealed in the bottom of an apple box and then covered with apples. When the slave hunters searched the home and were unable to locate anyone, they ended up near the container and made remarks about how delicious the apples were. As a result, the slave hunters each stole a couple apples from the owner of the house, who conceded that they were in fact nice apples.

Notable Mention, Michigan and Beyond

Routes of the Underground Railroad, around 1848 In the ‘underground railroad’, Erastus Hussey of Battle Creek, Michigan, was a well-known figure, as was his father. He held a variety of leadership roles, including Michigan state senator, Battle Creek mayor, and Calhoun County clerk, to mention a few of his achievements. He was instrumental in the founding of the Republican Party, the nomination of Abraham Lincoln for president, and the passage of Michigan’s revolutionary Personal Liberty Bill, which granted runaway slaves the right to habeas corpus, a jury trial, and the possibility of a high court appeal in their cases.

  • Tubman, also known as the Black Moses, was born a slave in 1820 in Dorchester County, Maryland, on the Chesapeake Bay.
  • It was thought that, like Moses, she communicated with God on a regular basis and was destined to guide slaves to a promised land, probably Canada or the northern United States.
  • He knew it would be the first of many adventures ahead of him.
  • The Underground Railroad allowed her to make up to 19 voyages while assisting 300 fellow slaves reach freedom.
  • Her skill became well-known around the world.
  • She was never apprehended and went on to serve as a Union scout, spy, and nurse throughout the Civil War.

She remained in Auburn, New York, for the rest of her life, where she lived a meager existence for the rest of her life. Written by Fred Peppel, a member of the Kalamazoo Public Library’s staff, in February 2006.

Sources

In the play “Henry Montague,” Henry Montague is the main character. David Fisher and Frank Little are the editors of this volume. A. W. Bowen & Company, 1906H 977.417 F53, Chicago

Nathan M. Thomas: Birthright Member of the Society of Friends, Pioneer Physician, Early and Earnest Advocate of the Abolition of Slavery, Friend and Helper of the Fugitive Slave

Nathan M. Thomas, Cassopolis, MI: Stanton B. Thomas, 1925H 921 T459; Thomas, Nathan M.

African Americans in Michigan

Nathan M. Thomas, Cassopolis, Michigan: Stanton B. Thomas, 1925H 921 T459

The Rural Black Heritage between Chicago and Detroit, 1850-1929: a photograph album and random thoughts

Nathan M. Thomas, Cassopolis, MI: Stanton B. Thomas, 1925H 921 T459

Articles

Underground Railroad is the subject of this file. The Underground Railroad File (also known as the Orange Dot File)

Websites

Underground Railroad was a network of people, both black and white, who helped escaped enslaved persons from the southern United States by providing them with refuge and assistance. It came forth as a result of the convergence of numerous separate covert initiatives. Although the exact dates of its inception are unknown, it was active from the late 18th century until the Civil War, after which its attempts to weaken the Confederacy were carried out in a less-secretive manner until the Civil War ended.

Quaker Abolitionists

The Society of Friends (Quakers) is often regarded as the first organized group to actively assist escaped enslaved persons. In 1786, George Washington expressed dissatisfaction with Quakers for attempting to “liberate” one of his enslaved servants. Abolitionist and Quaker Isaac T. Hopper established a network in Philadelphia in the early 1800s to assist enslaved persons who were on the run from slavery. Abolitionist organisations founded by Quakers in North Carolina lay the basis for escape routes and safe havens for fugitive slaves during the same time period.

What Was the Underground Railroad?

According to historical records, the Quakers were the first organized organization to actively assist fugitive slaves. When Quakers attempted to “liberate” one of Washington’s enslaved employees in 1786, George Washington took exception to it. Abolitionist and Quaker Isaac T. Hopper established a network in Philadelphia in the early 1800s to assist enslaved persons who were fleeing their masters’ hands. Abolitionist societies founded by Quakers in North Carolina lay the basis for escape routes and safe havens for fugitives at the same time.

How the Underground Railroad Worked

The majority of enslaved persons aided by the Underground Railroad were able to flee to neighboring states like as Kentucky, Virginia, and Maryland. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 made catching fugitive enslaved persons a lucrative industry in the deep South, and there were fewer hiding places for them as a result of the Act. The majority of fugitive enslaved people were on their own until they reached specific places farther north. The escaping enslaved people were escorted by individuals known as “conductors.” Private residences, churches, and schools were also used as hiding places throughout the war.

The personnel in charge of running them were referred to as “stationmasters.” There were several well-traveled roads that ran west through Ohio and into Indiana and Iowa.

While some traveled north via Pennsylvania and into New England, or through Detroit on their route to Canada, others chose to travel south. The Little-Known Underground Railroad That Ran South to Mexico.

Fugitive Slave Acts

The Fugitive Slave Acts were a major cause for many fugitive slaves to flee to Canada. This legislation, which was passed in 1793, authorized local governments to catch and extradite fugitive enslaved individuals from inside the borders of free states back to their places of origin, as well as to penalize anybody who assisted the fleeing enslaved people. Personal Liberty Laws were introduced in certain northern states to fight this, but they were overturned by the Supreme Court in 1842. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was intended to reinforce the preceding legislation, which was perceived by southern states to be insufficiently enforced at the time of passage.

The northern states were still considered a danger zone for fugitives who had managed to flee.

Some Underground Railroad operators chose to station themselves in Canada and sought to assist fugitives who were arriving to settle in the country.

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was the most well-known conductor of the Underground Railroad during its heyday. When she and two of her brothers fled from a farm in Maryland in 1849, she was given the name Harriet (her married name was Tubman). She was born Araminta Ross, and she was raised as Harriet Tubman. They returned a couple of weeks later, but Tubman fled on her own again shortly after, this time making her way to the state of Pennsylvania. In following years, Tubman returned to the plantation on a number of occasions to rescue family members and other individuals.

Tubman was distraught until she had a vision of God, which led her to join the Underground Railroad and begin escorting other fugitive slaves to the Maryland state capital.

Frederick Douglass

She was the most well-known conductor of the Underground Railroad, and her name is Harriet Tubman. In 1849, she and two of her brothers managed to escape from a farm in Maryland, where they were born into slavery under the name Araminta Ross. Harriet Tubman was her married name at the time. While they did return a few of weeks later, Tubman set out on her own shortly after, making her way to the state of Pennsylvania. In following years, Tubman returned to the plantation on a number of occasions to rescue family members and other people.

Tubman was distraught until she had a vision of God, which led her to join the Underground Railroad and begin escorting other runaway slaves to the Maryland state capital of Fredericksburg. In order to avoid being captured by the United States, Tubman would transport parties of escapees to Canada.

Who Ran the Underground Railroad?

The vast majority of Underground Railroad operators were regular individuals, including farmers and business owners, as well as preachers and religious leaders. Some affluent individuals were active, including Gerrit Smith, a billionaire who stood for president on two separate occasions. Smith acquired a full family of enslaved people from Kentucky in 1841 and freed them from their captivity. Levi Coffin, a Quaker from North Carolina, is credited with being one of the first recorded individuals to assist escaped enslaved persons.

Coffin stated that he had discovered their hiding spots and had sought them out in order to assist them in moving forward.

Coffin eventually relocated to Indiana and then Ohio, where he continued to assist fugitive enslaved individuals no matter where he was.

John Brown

Abolitionist John Brown worked as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, and it was at this time that he founded the League of Gileadites, which was dedicated to assisting fleeing enslaved individuals in their journey to Canada. Abolitionist John Brown would go on to play a variety of roles during his life. His most well-known duty was conducting an assault on Harper’s Ferry in order to raise an armed army that would march into the deep south and free enslaved people at gunpoint. Ultimately, Brown’s forces were beaten, and he was executed for treason in 1859.

  • The year 1844, he formed a partnership with Vermont schoolteacher Delia Webster, and the two were jailed for assisting an escaped enslaved lady and her young daughter.
  • Charles Torrey was sentenced to six years in jail in Maryland for assisting an enslaved family in their attempt to flee through Virginia.
  • After being apprehended in 1844 while transporting a boatload of freed slaves from the Caribbean to the United States, Massachusetts sea captain Jonathan Walker was sentenced to prison for life.
  • John Fairfield of Virginia turned down the opportunity to assist in the rescue of enslaved individuals who had been left behind by their families as they made their way north.
  • He managed to elude capture twice.
See also:  Who Helped The Slaves In The Underground Railroad? (Suits you)

End of the Line

Operation of the Underground Railroad came to an end in 1863, during the American Civil War. In actuality, its work was shifted aboveground as part of the Union’s overall campaign against the Confederate States of America. Once again, Harriet Tubman made a crucial contribution by organizing intelligence operations and serving as a commanding officer in Union Army efforts to rescue the liberated enslaved people who had been freed.

MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: Harriet Tubman led a daring Civil War raid after the Underground Railroad was shut down.

Sources

Bound for Canaan: The Epic Story of the Underground Railroad is a book about the Underground Railroad. Fergus Bordewich is a Scottish actor. A Biography of Harriet Tubman: The Road to Freedom Catherine Clinton is the first lady of the United States. Who Exactly Was in Charge of the Underground Railroad? ‘Henry Louis Gates’ is a pseudonym for Henry Louis Gates. The Underground Railroad’s History in New York is a little known fact. The Smithsonian Institution’s magazine. The Underground Railroad’s Dangerous Allure is well documented.

The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad was not a legitimate railroad in the traditional sense. It was a network of people, both black and white, who assisted enslaved people, people who were compelled to do labor and services against their will, people who were escaping from their enslavers, and those who enslaved someone else. This network was known as “Underground” because it was top secret, and it was known as “Railroad” because terminology such as “conductor” and “depot” were used as codes to identify helpers and safe havens on the network.

  • A large number of fugitives fled to the northern United States and Canada, where they could live in relative freedom.
  • Escaping was extremely perilous.
  • They were well aware that the consequences of being caught would be severe.
  • It was also extremely perilous to travel north.
  • They primarily went on foot, although they sometimes traveled by horse, rail, and even elegant carriages on occasion.
  • Southern Michigan was home to a number of communities that were part of the Underground Railroad.
  • Depots were the names given to the hiding spots.
  • Some of the fugitives were apprehended in Canada.
  • When fugitives made it to the United States, they frequently volunteered to assist other enslaved persons who were attempting to flee through the Underground Railroad.

Look Closer

This is a picture of a handbill, which is a printed advertisement that is distributed by hand. What is the purpose of the advertisement? A handbill from 1853 requesting that people contribute farm implements to previously enslaved persons.

What Did I Learn?

Handbills, which are printed advertisements that are handed out by hand, are depicted here.

Is there a purpose to this advertisement? A handbill from 1853 requesting that individuals contribute farm implements to previously enslaved persons was distributed to the general public.

I Wonder…

Identify a question (or questions, if you have more than one) that the tale did not satisfactorily address.

The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad, a vast network of people who helped fugitive slaves escape to the North and to Canada, was not run by any single organization or person. Rather, it consisted of many individuals – many whites but predominently black – who knew only of the local efforts to aid fugitives and not of the overall operation. Still, it effectively moved hundreds of slaves northward each year – according to one estimate,the South lost 100,000 slaves between 1810 and 1850. An organized system to assist runaway slaves seems to have begun towards the end of the 18th century. In 1786 George Washington complained about how one of his runaway slaves was helped by a “society of Quakers, formed for such purposes.” The system grew, and around 1831 it was dubbed “The Underground Railroad,” after the then emerging steam railroads. The system even used terms used in railroading: the homes and businesses where fugitives would rest and eat were called “stations” and “depots” and were run by “stationmasters,” those who contributed money or goods were “stockholders,” and the “conductor” was responsible for moving fugitives from one station to the next.For the slave, running away to the North was anything but easy. The first step was to escape from the slaveholder. For many slaves, this meant relying on his or her own resources. Sometimes a “conductor,” posing as a slave, would enter a plantation and then guide the runaways northward. The fugitives would move at night. They would generally travel between 10 and 20 miles to the next station, where they would rest and eat, hiding in barns and other out-of-the-way places. While they waited, a message would be sent to the next station to alert its stationmaster.The fugitives would also travel by train and boat – conveyances that sometimes had to be paid for. Money was also needed to improve the appearance of the runaways – a black man, woman, or child in tattered clothes would invariably attract suspicious eyes. This money was donated by individuals and also raised by various groups, including vigilance committees.Vigilance committees sprang up in the larger towns and cities of the North, most prominently in New York, Philadelphia, and Boston. In addition to soliciting money, the organizations provided food, lodging and money, and helped the fugitives settle into a community by helping them find jobs and providing letters of recommendation.The Underground Railroad had many notable participants, including John Fairfield in Ohio, the son of a slaveholding family, who made many daring rescues, Levi Coffin, a Quaker who assisted more than 3,000 slaves, and Harriet Tubman, who made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom.

Detroit’s Decisive Role in the Underground Railroad

Identify a question (or questions, if you have more than one) that the tale did not satisfactorily resolve.

Kids History: Underground Railroad

Civil War is a historical event that occurred in the United States. During the American Civil War, the phrase “Underground Railroad” was used to describe a network of persons, residences, and hiding places that slaves in the southern United States used to flee to freedom in the northern United States and Canada. Is it possible that there was a railroad? The Underground Railroad wasn’t truly a railroad in the traditional sense. It was the moniker given to the method by which individuals managed to flee.

  • Conductors and stations are two types of conductors.
  • Conductors were those who were in charge of escorting slaves along the path.
  • Even those who volunteered their time and resources by donating money and food were referred to as shareholders.
  • Who was employed by the railroad?
  • Some of the Underground Railroad’s conductors were former slaves, such as Harriet Tubman, who escaped slavery by way of the Underground Railroad and subsequently returned to assist other slaves in their escape.
  • They frequently offered safe havens in their houses, as well as food and other supplies to those in need.
  • B.

What mode of transportation did the people use if there was no railroad?

Slaves would frequently go on foot during the night.

The distance between stations was generally between 10 and 20 miles.

Was it a potentially hazardous situation?

There were those trying to help slaves escape, as well as those who were attempting to aid them.

In what time period did the Underground Railroad operate?

It reached its zenith in the 1850s, just before the American Civil War.

How many people were able to flee?

Over 100,000 slaves are said to have fled over the railroad’s history, with 30,000 escaping during the peak years before the Civil War, according to some estimates.

This resulted in a rule requiring that fugitive slaves who were discovered in free states be returned to their masters in the south.

Slaves were now had to be carried all the way to Canada in order to avoid being kidnapped once more by the British.

The abolitionist movement began with the Quakers in the 17th century, who believed that slavery was incompatible with Christian principles.

Ducksters’ Lewis Hayden House is located in the town of Lewis Hayden. The Lewis Hayden House functioned as a station on the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War. Information on the Underground Railroad that is both interesting and educational

  • Slave proprietors wished to be free. Harriet Tubman, a well-known train conductor, was apprehended and imprisoned. They offered a $40,000 reward for information leading to her capture. That was a significant amount of money at the time
  • Levi Coffin, a Quaker who is claimed to have assisted around 3,000 slaves in gaining their freedom, was a hero of the Underground Railroad. The most usual path for individuals to escape was up north into the northern United States or Canada, although some slaves in the deep south made their way to Mexico or Florida
  • Canada was known to slaves as the “Promised Land” because of its promise of freedom. The Mississippi River was originally known as the “River Jordan” in the Bible
  • Fleeing slaves were sometimes referred to as passengers or freight on railroads, in accordance with railroad nomenclature

Exactly what slave owners desired Harriet Tubman, a well-known train conductor, was apprehended. A prize of $40,000 was offered to anyone who could bring her in. In those days, it was a LOT of money; Levi Coffin, a Quaker who is claimed to have assisted about 3,000 slaves in gaining their freedom, was a hero of the Underground Railroad. The most frequent path for individuals to escape was up north into the northern United States or Canada, but some slaves in the deep south made their way to Mexico or Florida; Canada was referred to as the “Promised Land” by slaves who fled from the United States.

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  • Learn about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad by reading this article.
See also:  Who Took Part In The Underground Railroad? (Professionals recommend)

HistoryCivil WarHistoryCivil War Works Cited

The Underground Railroad of 1812: Paths to freedom along the Canadian border (U.S. National Park Service)

This political cartoon parodies British efforts to destabilize the American slave economy, as shown by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS). A year before the events of 1807, Peter Denison, a slave in Detroit, Michigan, was indentured to Elijah Brush for a year, after which Brush awarded Denison his freedom. Brush, it appears, had done this action without the knowledge or consent of his owner, Catherine Tucker, who was there. Tucker expressed his displeasure with the emancipation and sought Denison’s return.

Catherine Tucker’s property, Judge Augustus Woodward ruled in the case.

Despite the fact that the Northwest Ordinance had prohibited slavery in the region after 1787, the territories that the British surrendered to the United States in 1796 were subject to a different interpretation, and Denison was considered to have remained a slave under the terms of the treaty.

Following the Chesapeake-Leopard incident in 1807, territorial governor William Hull granted Denison “a formal permission,” allowing him to establish a military unit comprised of free blacks and fugitive slaves in the Chesapeake region.

This group of men, according to Hull, had showed an unquestionable “connection to our government, as well as a resolve to help in the protection of our country.” A short time later, the situation that had forced Hull to turn to Denison and the city’s black population had passed, and the governor ordered that the militia be disbanded.

  • Denison’s men had fled from bondage in Canada to the freedom of Michigan.
  • Slavery had been abolished in Canada in 1793, but not all enslaved people were freed at once; the institution was phased out over time.
  • Although there were a few enslaved persons living in Canada at the time of the War of 1812’s conclusion, Canadian law prevented the further entry of slavery.
  • William Hull, the Territorial Governor of Michigan (NPSD) During the summer of 1812, Governor Hull gave commissions to Captain Denison, Lieutenant Ezra Burgess, and Ensign Bossett, all of whom were African-American men of color.
  • Their services would soon be required when the United States declared war on Britain in June 1812, with Detroit serving as the first theater of action; Denison was believed to have been taken after Hull surrendered the city to British General Isaac Brock.
  • John’s Church of England, which was located immediately east of Detroit and across the river.
  • He, his wife, and his other children most certainly crossed the border into Canada, demonstrating how the route to freedom had altered considerably northward to include the freedom of Canada within a few short years.

Peter Denison, reportedly as a free man, took use of this chance to travel north to Canada, without a doubt.

Exploring Underground Railroad ties in Southwest Michigan

British attempts to destabilize the American slave economy are parodied in this political cartoon by the American Antiquarian Society (AAS). Elijah Brush had previously taken indentured servitude over Peter Denison, a slave in Detroit, Michigan, for a year, after which Brush released Denison. In this case, it appears that Brush made this decision without the knowledge or consent of his owner, Catherine Tucker. Tucker expressed his displeasure with the emancipation and sought Denison’s return.

Catherine Tucker’s property, Judge Augustus Woodward ruled in the case.

However, even though the Northwest Ordinance had prohibited slavery in the region after 1787, Denison’s properties were subject to a different interpretation when the British relinquished control of the province to the United States in 1796, and he officially remained a slave.

Following the Chesapeake-Leopard incident in 1807, territory governor William Hull granted Denison “a formal permission,” allowing him to organize a military unit comprised of free blacks and fugitive slaves.

As Hull points out, Denison had apparently acquired the trust of Detroit’s black populace, and under his direction, segregated troops “often appeared under arms” and “made remarkable progress in military discipline.” This group of men, according to Hull, had showed an unquestionable “attachment to our government, as well as a resolve to help in the defense of the country.” A short time later, the situation that had forced Hull to turn to Denison and the city’s black population was ended, and the governor ordered that the militia be disbanded.

  1. Denison’s men had fled from bondage in Canada to the freedom of Michigan; this brief southern exodus casts doubt on the traditional image of the Underground Railroad as a path leading north to Canada and freedom.
  2. When enslaved peoples were fleeing British Canada in the late 1700s and early 1800s, the most popular path to freedom was south, through free American territory in the Old Northwest.
  3. As a result, the Michigan Territory offered the prospect of immediate freedom to those who were brave enough to cross the treacherous waters of the Detroit River to reach the territory.
  4. It was in response to this reality that enslaved Americans decided to go north over a well-trodden trail, known as the “underground railroad,” and eventually to a new country of freedom in Canada.
  5. William Hull, the Territorial Governor of Michigan (NPSD).
  6. When it came to segregated militias, Hull claimed that they were free citizens of the Michigan Territory, and that they had the same right to wield weapons as white residents in times of crisis.
  7. By 1816, a black Peter Dennison was reported to be living as a free man in the village of Sandwich and attending the St.
  8. Denison, now identified as Dennison, may have used a different spelling or did not notify the church secretary of the change in spelling.

This was an excellent chance for Peter Denison to travel north to Canada, ostensibly as a free man, and he took advantage of it.

Great Lakes vessels helped free slaves on Underground Railroad

Sandusky, Ohio, was the site of the construction of a two-masted schooner in 1843. This vessel, unbeknownst to its builders or Chicago-based owners, was destined to have a significant effect on the Great Lakes maritime scene for more than a century. Built to transport grain and timber throughout the Great Lakes, the Homesoon was repurposed for a new purpose. Sandusky had a thriving port in the mid-1800s, with ships arriving and departing on a regular basis, bound for locations throughout the United States and Canada; the city’s maritime links made it a perfect location for an Underground Railroad center.

There were heroic men and women, both white and black, who continued to struggle for the abolition of slavery after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850, which made helping enslaved individuals in their escape from slavery a criminal offense.

Captain James Nugent was an abolitionist who was engaged in the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War.

In the book “The Underground Railroad from Slavery to Freedom,” his name appears as an operative on the railroad.

Captain Nugent wasn’t the only one who held firm to his beliefs.

Schooners and steamers were utilized to flee from the United States, which was separated from Canada by the Great Lakes.

He was apprehended and imprisoned in Milwaukee, but abolitionists were able to break down the jail’s doors and rescue him.

The maritime Underground Railroad consisted of more than just ships, as you may imagine.

Lighthouses, such as the Grand River Light, served as safe havens for fugitives and runaways.

Reed hired Black people to work on his ships, which allowed those fleeing to pose as employees until they reached Canada.

It was planned for him to dock at Racine, Wisconsin, to pick up fugitives, which would allow them unfettered passage north.

Even some white residents assisted in the Underground Railroad, it was mostly organized and run by Black people, either free people living in the North or former slaves such as Harriet Tubman, who were enslaved at the time.

This campaign was led by George DeBaptiste, a free Black man from Detroit who was a pioneer in the civil rights movement.

Whitney in order to better assist individuals in their journey to freedom.

In accordance with the findings of underwater archaeologists Keith Meverden and Tamara Thomsen, Great Lakes vessels such as the Arrow, United States, Mayflower and Bay Citywere known to have been part in the Underground Railroad due to the fact that they were apprehended.

The personal experiences of escaped slaves and abolitionists were read today in order to have a better understanding of the ways in which the Great Lakes maritime community assisted enslaved individuals.

After colliding with another vessel on Lake Michigan in 1858, the schooner sunk and was unable to see the American Civil War or the end of slavery.

Today, the schoonerHomesises in around 160 feet of water, maintained as a permanent testament to people who, despite the peril, battled injustice and won. She works as the Director of Education and Public Programs at the Wisconsin Maritime Museum in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. ADDITIONAL MARITIME MUSEUMS:

  • The Wisconsin Maritime Museum will hold an exhibit by the Lakeshore Artists Guild that will be influenced by water
  • Gardening using a victory garden kit from Wisconsin Maritime Museum can help you get started on your project. According to the Wisconsin Maritime Museum in Manitowoc, sailor bones bear witness to the life they led.

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