When Did John Rankin Began Helping Slaves Escape On The Underground Railroad?

From 1822 to 1865, Rankin, along with his wife and children, assisted hundreds of escaped slaves in their trek to freedom. Located on the Ohio River, John Rankin’s home (and Ripley, Ohio in general) were considered one of the first stations on this route of the Underground Railroad.

What did John Rankin do on the Underground Railroad?

  • John Rankin (abolitionist) John Rankin (February 5, 1793 – March 18, 1886) was an American Presbyterian minister, educator and abolitionist. Upon moving to Ripley, Ohio in 1822, he became known as one of Ohio’s first and most active “conductors” on the Underground Railroad.

What did John Rankin do for the Underground Railroad?

John Rankin (February 5, 1793 – March 18, 1886) was an American Presbyterian minister, educator and abolitionist. Upon moving to Ripley, Ohio, in 1822, he became known as one of Ohio’s first and most active “conductors” on the Underground Railroad.

How did the Rankin Family help escaping slaves?

Rankin, his wife, Jean, and their 13 children gave refuge to more than 2,000 escaping slaves by hiding them in the cellar beneath the barn or in the attic, as many as 12 at one time, according to the Ohio History Connection, formerly the Ohio Historical Society, which has owned the site since 1938.

How did John Parker help with the Underground Railroad?

Parker, who was African American, helped hundreds of slaves to freedom in the Underground Railroad resistance movement based in Ripley, Ohio. He saved and rescued fugitive slaves for nearly fifteen years. He was one of the few black people to patent an invention before 1900.

How many slaves were stayed with the Rankin Family?

Built in 1825, the Rankin House was home to abolitionist and Presbyterian minister John Rankin, his wife Jean, and their 13 children. It’s estimated that over 2,000 slaves seeking freedom stayed with the Rankins, sometimes as many as 12 at a time.

Was John Rankin a conductor on the Underground Railroad?

Aboard the Underground Railroad– John Rankin House. A National Historic Landmark, this was the home of Presbyterian minister John Rankin who is reputed to have been one of Ohio’s first and most active “conductors” on the Underground Railroad.

What happened to John Rankin because of his actions against slavery?

He helped establish the Free Presbyterian Church of America, which prohibited slave owners from becoming members. Rankin also helped form an anti-slavery society in New York and established the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society in 1835. In 1829, he established Ripley College. Rankin died on March 18, 1886, in Ironton, Ohio.

Why was Ripley Ohio important to escaping slaves?

With its location along the banks of the Ohio River and proximity to the slaveholding state of Kentucky, Ripley became an early stop on the Underground Railroad – a network of people and places organized to help escaping slaves find freedom in the north. Rankin also published several important anti-slavery writings.

Who has Rankin worked with?

By the Royal Photographic Society, Rankin was awarded an Honorary Fellowship. He has photographed many celebrities such as Kate Moss, Spice Girls, Lily Allen, Britney Spears, Kevin Spacey, Cate Blanchett, Queen Elizabeth II, The Rolling Stones, Madonna, Juliette Binoche, Björ and more.

When did John Rankin get married?

On January 12, 1814 he married Jean Lowry and together created a family of nine sons and four daughters, all of who lived to have families of their own. In 1816 Rankin was licensed to preach by the Presbytery of Abington, Virginia.

When did Parker escape slavery?

John Parker was born a slave. In 1845, he purchased his freedom and eventually made his way to Indiana and Ohio, settling in Ripley in 1850.

What did John P Parker do?

John Parker, inventor and businessman, was also a prominent Underground Railroad conductor before the Civil War. He was reputedly responsible for the rescue of nearly 1,000 enslaved people between 1845 and 1865.

How long did it take John P Parker to buy his freedom?

For eighteen years he tried to escape slavery. Meanwhile, he learned the trade of iron molding. At length he managed to save enough money to buy his freedom. He made his way north, married, and settled in the town of Ripley, Ohio, across from Kentucky.

When was the John Rankin House built?

Born into slavery in Beaufort, South Carolina, he freed himself, his crew, and their families during the American Civil War by commandeering a Confederate transport ship, CSS Planter, in Charleston harbor, on May 13, 1862, and sailing it from Confederate-controlled waters of the harbor to the U.S. blockade that

John Rankin – Ohio History Central

According to Ohio History Central John and Jane Rankin were married in 1872. He was a Presbyterian clergyman who was also a significant part of the Underground Railroad network, which helped fleeing slaves in the years leading up to the American Civil War. John Rankin died in 1865. Rankin was born on the 4th of February, 1793, in the state of Tennessee. He received his education at Washington College in Virginia and went on to serve as a preacher in the Presbyterian Church. Rankin devoted his life to the abolition of slavery in the United States.

Because slavery was legal in Kentucky, Rankin’s opinions on the subject were widely dissented.

Slavery was prohibited in the state of Ohio.

Rankin was a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad in Ripley, and he welcomed African Americans seeking freedom into his home while living there.

  1. Rankin would use a lamp to notify escaped slaves in Kentucky that it was safe for them to cross the Ohio River, which they did.
  2. Because of the United States Constitution and the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, slave owners were able to retrieve fugitive slaves, even if they were living in a free state like Ohio at the time.
  3. From South Carolina to Canada, escaped slaves might find refuge at Underground Railroad sites along the journey.
  4. In her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe honored Rankin’s attempts to aid African Americans in the United States.
  5. Rankin was a Presbyterian clergyman who spent the most of his time in Ohio.
  6. He also assisted in the formation of an anti-slavery group in New York, which later became the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society, which was founded in 1835.
  7. The institution had a maximum enrollment of 250 students at its height.
  8. Many of the college’s students were from Kentucky, and they did not share Rankin’s abolitionist viewpoints on slavery.

Some students dropped out of Ripley College and never returned. Rankin also gave lectures for the American Anti-Slavery Society in the northern United States. He was frequently the target of gang-related violence. He died on March 18, 1886, in Ironton, Ohio, after a brief illness.

See Also

  1. OHIO’S WAR: THE CIVIL WAR IN DOCUMENTS, edited by Christine Dee, is available online. Ann Hagedorn’s book, Ohio University Press, Athens, 2007
  2. Hagedorn, Ann Beyond the River: The Untold Story of the Heroes of the Underground Railroad is a book about the heroes of the Underground Railroad. Reid and Whitelaw (2002, 2002)
  3. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. Ohio’s Statesmen, Generals, and Soldiers in the War: A Portrait of the State. Clarke Publishing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1895
  4. Roseboom, Eugene H. The period from 1850 to 1873 is known as the Civil War Era. The Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Society published the book in 1944.

John Rankin (abolitionist) – Wikipedia

OHIO’S WAR: THE CIVIL WAR IN DOCUMENTS, edited by Christine Dee, ed. ; Ann Hagedorn’s book, Athens: Ohio University Press, 2007. “Beyond the River” is a nonfiction book that tells the story of the Underground Railroad heroes who went undetected for decades. Reid and Whitelaw, 2002; New York, NY: Simon & Schuster. Ohio’s Statesmen, Generals, and Soldiers in the War: A Documentary History ; Roseboom, Eugene H., Cincinnati, OH: Clarke, 1895. Between 1850 until 1873, the United States was in the Civil War.

Early career

Rankin was born in Dandridge, Jefferson County, Tennessee, to Richard and Jane (Steele) Rankin, and grew up in a strictCalvinist family with his siblings and parents. His parents were well-educated, which was rare in such a rural section of the country. They were devout Presbyterians, and their children were brought up in a religious environment. Jane was a staunch opponent of slavery who would not back down. : 22–23 Beginning when he was eight years old, John’s perspective on the world and his religious beliefs were profoundly influenced by two events: the Second Great Awakening revivals that were spreading through the Appalachian area, and the emergence of a slave revolt headed by Gabriel Prosser in 1800.

  • The opportunity to study at Washington College, under the guidance of Rev.
  • Following graduation, he was appointed pastor of the Abingdon Presbytery, but because his anti-slavery ideas were not tolerated, he departed Tennessee in 1817 and never returned.
  • Within a few months, however, he mustered the fortitude to speak out against “all forms of injustice,” first broadly and then explicitly against slavery, despite Tennessee’s status as a slave state.
  • He was taken aback when his elders replied by advising him that if he wanted to ever speak out against slavery from the pulpit again, he should consider leaving Tennessee immediately.
  • When Rankin stopped to preach at Lexington and Paris, Kentucky, he discovered of the need for a pastor at Concord Presbyterian Church in Carlisle, Kentucky, which he learned about while traveling north.
  • He stayed for four years and established a school for slaves; but, after a year, they were pushed from their schoolhouse to an empty home, and then to his friend’s kitchen, by club-wielding crowds, and the kids eventually ceased attending.

A rowing crew carried him and his family over the ice-cold river during the night of December 31 – January 1, 1822. In Ripley, he established a Presbyterian academy for boys, which the young Ulysses S. Grantonce went as a student in 1838.

Ripley and the Underground Railroad

An inside view of the Rankin residence as seen via a window. TheKentuckyshoreline may be seen on the other side of theOhio River, on the far side. In 1822, Ripley was a town characterized by frequent street fights and shootouts, with saloons serving as the most popular kind of establishment. During the Rankins’ first few months in town, hecklers and demonstrators frequently followed the new preacher around town and gathered outside his cabin, which was located just yards from the river at 220 Front Street and was under construction at the time.

Slave owners and hunters saw him as a major suspect, and they frequently visited at his house at all hours of the day and night, seeking information on fugitives.

A house on top of a 540-foot-high hill (160-meter-high) with a panoramic view of the village, the Ohio River, and the Kentucky shoreline, as well as farmland and fruit groves that could be used as sources of income, was built by Rankin in 1829 for his wife and nine children (of a total of thirteen children).

  1. The ex-slave story, on the other hand, refers to a pole with a light.
  2. When it was safe for them to pass into the free state of Ohio, the family could hang a lantern on a flagpole to indicate to fleeing slaves in Kentucky that they had arrived.
  3. During the forty years leading up to the Civil War, many of the slaves who managed to escape to freedom through Ripley’s family remained at the family’s property in North Carolina.
  4. It was renamed the Rankin House, and it is now a National Historic Landmark in the United States (see photos).
See also:  Who Was The Head Conductor Of The Underground Railroad? (Suits you)

The real Eliza

A tale of a lady the Rankins had kept in 1838 after she had fled by crossing the frozen Ohio River with her kid in her arms was related by Rankin during a visit to Lane Theological Seminary to see one of his sons. Professor Calvin Stowe was there at the time and heard the story. Stowe’s wife (Harriet Beecher Stowe) also heard the story and subsequently based the character Eliza in her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin on the woman in question.

Film depiction

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati has a permanent exhibit of Brothers of the Borderland, a video that recounts Rankin’s work in the Underground Railroad in Ripley and is available for viewing on demand.

Letters on Slavery

A copy of John Rankin’s book, Letters On Slavery, which was first published in 1826, is on display. It wasn’t long after Rankin arrived in Ripley that he found out that his brother Thomas, a trader in Augusta County, Virginia, had acquired some slaves. Eventually, he was prodded into writing a series of anti-slavery letters to his brother, which were later published in Ripley by the editor of the local newspaperThe Castigator. When the letters were collected and published in book form as Letters on Slavery in 1826, they were one of the earliest fully expressed anti-slavery viewpoints to be printed west of the Appalachian Mountains.

By the 1830s, Letters on Slavery had become required reading for abolitionists all throughout the United States, particularly in the South.

“His work on slavery was the catalyst for my involvement in the anti-slavery movement,” Garrison said later of Rankin, whom he referred to as his “anti-slavery father.”

Beyond the pulpit

When Theodore Weld and Rankin were involved in the formation of the American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833, Rankin became acquainted with him. Originally fromConnecticut, Weld had traveled toCincinnati from Oneida County, New York, to attend Lane Theological SeminaryinCincinnati, Ohio. In February 1834, Rankin joined the discussions on slavery hosted by Weld at Lane, and he later wrote a booklet on the subject’s ramifications. Weld initiated a year-long series of talks throughout Ohio, beginning in November 1834 at Rankin’s Ripley church, which elevated the prominence of the abolitionist cause in the state; Rankin, at Weld’s encouragement, did the same.

  • Both Rankin and Weld were instrumental in the formation of the Ohio Anti-slavery Society, which met for the first time in Putnam, Ohio (now Zanesville) in April 1835 and was attended by a large number of people.
  • The moment he arrived in Chillicothe to speak at a church, stones were hurled through the open window.
  • In 1836, Weld requested Rankin to join the group known as “the Seventy.” Rankin’s commitment to the cause grew as he faced increasing criticism to his “dangerous” beliefs, even from those who opposed slavery but were concerned about igniting a slave insurrection.
  • A bounty of up to $3,000 was placed on his life, and in 1841, he and his sons were forced to defend their home and barn from assailants who arrived in the middle of the night and set them on fire.
  • Grant was a student at Rankin’s Presbyterian Academy in Ripley, South Carolina.
  • The enactment of the Fugitive Slave Law in 1850 increased the risk and public profile of anyone who assisted fugitive slaves because it was now unlawful to do so, even in free states, as a result of the law.
  • Chase, in which the two men were both present.
  • More than one-third of the church’s members accompanied him and assisted Rankin in establishing what would later become known as the Free Presbyterian Church, which may have had as many as 72 congregations before the outbreak of the American Civil War.

Following World War II, Rankin was pleased to see the Presbyterian churches in Ripley reunited.

“Freedom’s Heroes”

Rankin’s burial is located at Ripley’s Maplewood Cemetery. In May 1892, six years after John Rankin’s death, a monument commemorating Rankin and his wife, Jean Lowry Rankin, was dedicated on the grounds of the Maplewood Cemetery in Ripley, Ohio, and was appropriately called “Freedom’s Heroes.”

“National Abolition Hall of Fame”

As a result of his efforts, Rankin was inducted into the National Abolition Hall of Fame in Peterboro, New York, in 2013.

Writings

  • John Rankin is the author of this work (1811). A solution for universalism is a detailed defense of the theory of future and unending punishment, which is presented in this book. Cincinnati. OCLC936386232
  • Rankin, John
  • Rankin, John (1826). The following letters about slavery were sent to Mr. Thomas Rankin, a shopkeeper in the town of Middlebrook in the county of Augusta, Virginia. Ripley, Ohio is a town in the state of Ohio. OCLC13221793
  • John Rankin is the author of this work (1833). Slavery in the United States of America: Letters to Mr. Thomas Rankin, a shopkeeper in Middlebrook, Augusta County, Virginia Rankin, John
  • Garrison and Knapp, Boston, Mass. (1836). letters about American slavery addressed to Mr. Thomas Rankin, merchant in Middlebrook, Augusta County (Virginia) (2nd ed.). Charles Whipple and John Rankin were born in Newburyport, Massachusetts (1838). letters about American slavery addressed to Mr. Thomas Rankin, merchant in Middlebrook, Augusta County (Virginia) (5th ed.). Isaac Knapp is a Boston-based writer.
  • Mr. John Rankin (1833). letters about American slavery addressed to Mr. Thomas Rankin, merchant in Middlebrook, Augusta County (Virginia) Rankin, John
  • Garrison and Knapp, Boston (1836). Letters about American Slavery addressed to Mr. Thomas Rankin, a shopkeeper in Middlebrook, Augusta County, Virginia (2nd ed.). Charles Whipple and John Rankin, both of Newburyport, Massachusetts (1838). Letters about American Slavery addressed to Mr. Thomas Rankin, a shopkeeper in Middlebrook, Augusta County, Virginia (5th ed.). Isaac Knapp is a Boston-based artist.

Archival material

The Ohio Historical Society in Columbus has a collection of archival materials about Rankin.

References

  1. In Columbus, the Ohio Historical Society has a collection of Rankin-related items.

Bibliography

  • ‘Beyond The River: The Untold Story of the Heroes of the Underground Railroad’ by Ann Hagedorn is out now. Waugh, Joan (2002, ISBN 0-684-87065-7)
  • SimonSchuster, 2002, ISBN 0-684-87065-7 (2009). US Grant is an acronym that stands for United States Grant. It is published by the University of North Carolina Press under the ISBN 978-0-8078-3317-9.

Further reading

  • John Rankin is the author of this work (1978). The life and times of Rev. John Rankin, an abolitionist. (Autobiography). Appalachian Press, based in Huntington, West Virginia. OCLC4702737
  • Ritchie, Andrew
  • OCLC4702737 (1870). The soldier, the struggle, and the victory: a brief summary of Rev. John Rankin’s contributions to the anti-slavery movement. The Western Tract and Book Society is based in Cincinnati.

External links

  • Mr. John Rankin (1978). Rev. John Rankin’s life as an abolitionist is told in this book. (Autobiography). Appalachian Press is based in Huntington, West Virginia. RITCHIE, ANDREW (OCLC4702737)
  • (1870). An chronicle of Rev. John Rankin’s involvement in the anti-slavery movement, including a brief narrative of the soldier, the combat, and the triumph Western Tract and Book Society, based in Cincinnati, Ohio.

John Rankin

In the wake of the American Revolution and the Second Great Awakening, John Rankin (1793-1886), a white southerner by birth, was a leading figure in the first wave of antislavery agitation that erupted in the United States. In 1815, he became a member of the Manumission Society of Tennessee. Rankin became a licensed Presbyterian pastor in 1817, and he immediately began teaching that slaveholding was wrong. After Presbyterian authorities advised Rankin that he should never again express such views from the pulpit in Tennessee, Rankin made the decision to relocate with his family to a more liberated area.

  • In 1822, Rankin was forced to transfer to Ripley, Ohio, due to a combination of increasing personal risk and financial difficulties.
  • It was in 1824 when Rankin discovered that his brother Thomas, who was born in Virginia, had become a slaveholder.
  • It was first published serially in Rankin’s local newspaper, the Castigator, but it was not until 1826 that the piece was published in book form by a Cincinnati publisher.
  • It was one of the first publications published by the newly formed American Anti-Slavery Society in 1833, when it was first published.
  • The Presbyterian Church split in 1838 into two groups, the New School and the Old School, on the issue of evangelicalism.
  • Abolitionist sentiment among New School Presbyterians began in 1846, when their General Assembly reversed a minister’s suspension for advocating for slavery in the church.
  • It was in November 1847 that the Presbyterian comeouters came together to create the Free Synod of Cincinnati, which was eventually called the Free Presbyterian Church.

John Rankin was one of the most well-known Underground Railroad conductors in the United States, and he was the inspiration for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s fictitious character, Eliza Harris, in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which was based on a real-life incident.

They worked in conjunction with African-American John Parker to transform the little Ohio town of Ripley into one of the most important crossing locations for fugitives from slavery.

Rankin’s reputation among disgruntled Kentuckians rose to the point that a $3,000 reward was set on his head.

Despite this, the Underground Railroad conductors in Ripley’s stated that not a single slave who made it to their hamlet had ever been recaptured.

He served as a vital link between the first generation of opponents of slavery and the later immediate abolitionists of the nineteenth century.

Rankin also represents tens of thousands of antislavery Southerners who opted to flee the region in protest against human bondage, according to the organization.

The Rankin House – The History List

Photo by Rdikeman / Creative Commons BY-SA 3.0 A National Historic Landmark and Underground Railroad Station, the Rankin House is located in the heart of downtown. The Rankin House, located on Liberty Hill with a view of the Ohio River and the town of Ripley, is one of the more well-known places that played a role in the Underground Railroad’s efforts to free slaves. The building was constructed in 1828. The Ohio River is seen from this state memorial, which has one of the most spectacular vistas on the river.

  1. The house still has most of its original woodwork, as well as numerous personal Rankin belongings, such as the family Bible, on display.
  2. Rankin expressed himself as follows: “Many human beings have found freedom via the doors of my house, yet although there was a danger to life and property, there was great joy in providing refuge to the fearful fugitives.
  3. In 1793, Rev.
  4. After several years of preaching in Kentucky, Rankin and his wife Jean decided to relocate their expanding family across the Ohio River to Ripley, which was then part of the newly formed state of Ohio.
  5. In 1825, he erected the residence on Liberty Hill, which has a beautiful view of the river.
  6. The Rankin family (which consisted of 13 children) was quite proud of the fact that they had never lost a “passenger.” The Rankins took in the majority of the 2,000 fugitive slaves that passed through Ripley on their way to freedom.
  7. The Ripley Anti-Slavery Society was founded by Rankin who lectured, preached, wrote, and toured throughout the United States to educate people about the ills of slavery as well as the necessity of its abolition.
  8. Abolitionist Wm.
  9. Following the description of a slave who carried her kid across the melting ice of the Ohio River and was spared from bounty hunters who pursued her when the ice broke up, Harriet Beecher Stowe was inspired to write her own version of the story.
  10. Seven sons and one grandson of Rankin served in the Civil War, and all returned home safely.

JOHN RANKIN’s wife Jean died in 1878, and he died in 1886 at the age of 93, and they are both interred at Ripley’s Maplewood Cemetery. More information about the John Rankin House in Ripley, Ohio’s Historic District.

List of trips to this site

  • The Underground Railroad – a driving tour through historic America
See also:  What Was Rev. Rankin’s Role In The Underground Railroad?

Shop for gifts for history lovers:

  • Shirts, hats, mugs, stickers, and other merchandise with the “History Nerd” logo
  • Historic papers, tees, mugs and static clings are all part of our 1776 collection, which also includes other items. The Declaration of Independence was produced by hand on a historic press in Philadelphia. Gifts from historic locations comprise the Historic America Collection.

John Rankin, Abolitionist born

Monday, April 2, 1793

John Rankin, Abolitionist born

*John Rankin is a fictional character. John Rankin was born on this day in 1793, making him the oldest of the Rankin family. He was a white-American preacher who worked with the Underground Railroad as an abolitionist. Rankin was born in the county of Jefferson in the state of Tennessee. After graduating from district school, he went on to Washington College in Jonesborough, Tennessee. A family of nine sons and four girls was born to him and Jean Lowry on January 12, 1814, all of them went on to start their own lives and have their own children.

  • He served as a preacher at the Jefferson County Presbyterian Church and lived in Concord and Cane Ridge, Kentucky, for four years.
  • It was in this location that the infamous “Abolition Letters” were penned.
  • In the case of slave owners wanting to regain their slave property, his residence on Front Street was too accessible.
  • In 1828, the Rankin family moved into what would become known as ” The Rankin House.” The Reverend Rankin was also instrumental in the establishment of churches at Cedron, Felicity, Buford, Sardinia, Huntington, Russellville, Decatur, and Winchester, all of which are located in Ohio.
  • Ripley’s Maplewood Cemetery is where he is laid to rest.
  • ISBN 0-85229-633-0 Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., 1996, copyright The Anti-Slavery Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to ending slavery.

Happy Birthday, Reverend John Rankin, Dedicated Abolitionist!

The Reverend John Rankin and his wife, Mrs. Rankin John Rankin (February 5, 1793 – March 18, 1886) was an American Presbyterian clergyman, educator, and abolitionist who lived during the American Revolutionary War. His move to Ripley, Ohio in 1822 earned him the reputation of being one of Ohio’s first and most active “conductors” on the Underground Railroad after being one of the state’s first and most active “conductors.” Rankin’s writings and activities in the anti-slavery campaign had an impact on prominent abolitionists such as William Lloyd Garrison, Henry Ward Beecher, and Harriet Beecher Stowe, who all lived before the Civil War.

  • When asked after the Civil War, “Who was responsible for abolishing slavery?” Beecher responded, “Reverend John Rankin and his sons were responsible for it.” Born in Dandridge, Jefferson County, Tennessee, and nurtured in a strict Calvinist family, Rankin went on to become a famous author.
  • Salem, Massachusetts, Anti-Slavery Movement Poster, ca.
  • He was taken aback when his elders replied by advising him that if he wanted to ever speak out against slavery from the pulpit again, he should consider leaving Tennessee immediately.
  • Virginians had made their home.
  • During the Rankins’ first few months in town, hecklers and protesters frequently followed the new preacher through town and gathered outside his cabin, which was being built just yards from the river at 220 Front Street.
  • When the local newspaper began publishing his letters to his brother on the subject of slavery (see the next section), Rankin’s reputation as a supporter and opponent of the anti-slavery movement began to grow.
  • A short time later, Rankin discovered that the house was too close to his workplace for him to properly raise his family in it.

None of the 2000 slaves he assisted in their emancipation were ever apprehended there.

Rankin and his family eventually had thirteen children.

In addition, Rankin built a stairway ascending up the hill to the home, allowing slaves to ascend to safety on their trip farther north in the journey.

The property became known as the Rankin House, and it is now a National Historic Landmark of the United States.

Rankin was visiting Lane Theological Seminary to see one of his sons when he shared the story with Professor Stowe.

The Rankin House offers a spectacular perspective of the Ohio River.

Brothers of the Borderland is a video that is a permanent fixture of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati that recounts Rankin’s involvement in the Underground Railroad while living in Ripley, Kentucky.

Letters On Slavery, a series of letters written by John Rankin to his brother Thomas, was published in 1826 and became a classic work on the subject of slavery.

Eventually, he was prodded into writing a series of anti-slavery letters to his brother, which were later published in Ripley by the editor of the local newspaperThe Castigator.

Thomas Rankin was persuaded by his brother’s comments and relocated to Ohio in 1827, where he emancipated all of his slaves. You can read the entire article here. More Breaking News may be found here.

In Ohio, a Warrior Against Slavery (Published 2017)

Ripley, Ohio’s John Parker House is a historic landmark. Photograph courtesy of Tony Cenicola/The New York Times In her flight from her captors, Eliza was stopped in her tracks by the banks of the freezing Ohio River, where she was holding her small boy in her arms. The mindless boldness that comes from desperation allowed her to leap from one ice floe to another, occasionally tumbling into the frigid water and lifting herself back up, until she reached the riverbank on the other side of the state line.

It was because the story of a white man who risked everything to save a slave touched so many people’s hearts that abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe incorporated a version of it in her novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” For many students who were required to read the book at school, the story of Eliza is their earliest and most lasting memory of freedom from slavery.

  • John P.
  • Image Photograph courtesy of Tony Cenicola/The New York Times Parker has aided hundreds of people in their quest for liberty.
  • Parker House in Ripley, pointed out to me during a visit there in December that it was undocumented.
  • His autobiography is written in the style of an action film: One of his most daring deeds was to transport a sleeping kid from the chamber of a white captive to the arms of parents who had not yet made it over the river to safety.
  • Fortunately, Parker’s life tale has not been completely forgotten about.
  • In all seriousness, the red-brick building where Parker worked and resided is very gorgeous.
  • Despite this, given the structure’s small size, I was concerned about whether it would hold enough Parker to tell his story in its entirety.

Scott was able to take care of what the home and its antiques were incapable of doing.

He was born to a black mother and a white father in Norfolk, Virginia, and was sold from his family to a slave dealer, who in turn sold him to a doctor in Mobile, Alabama, for a profit.

If the possibility of never seeing his mother again wasn’t enough to convince him that slavery was heinous, witnessing a fellow member of a chain gang being beaten to death was enough to convince him that the institution was heinous.

As a result, Parker made it a point to escape the tragedy that befell my forebears, who labored in the scorching hot fields of the Deep South.

Because he had acquired a craft, the widow could lease him to a foundry, where he could earn money from his efforts, and she could retain anything that was more than the sum given in the leasing agreement.

Rather of remaining in the South, Parker relocated to Ripley, where he was able to earn enough money to buy a home next to his workshop, marry, and establish a family.

As a result of obtaining a patent for a part that was in high demand at tobacco manufacturers, he rose to become one of the wealthiest persons in the region, which was at the time a significant trading center in the United States.

Perhaps as a result, he only sometimes provided refuge for runaways, and a visit of his home does not reveal the crawl tunnels and secret passageways that other of his counterparts on the Underground Railroad did.

What really fascinated me were the artifacts from the foundry that were on display and decorated the house.

In addition, tools manufactured in the foundry are displayed.

ImageCredit.

The home performs its best in the room that has been meticulously recreated to look as it would have in Parker’s day, replete with Ivory soap and a toothbrush.

I gazed out the window to take in the view of the river.

Parker’s life is shown in a sequence of paintings on the bottom level, which are displayed in a boat that serves as a frame.

Parker may have been a lone fighter in the fight against slavery, but he was not alone in his efforts.

This makes it the greatest network of fugitives in the region, with more than 300 people in Ripley serving as fugitives.

And, of course, there is no shortage of attractions in the surrounding area, such as theHarriet Beecher Stowe House or the fantasticNational Underground Railroad Freedom Center, which has a reproduction of a slave home as well as interactive programming.

Throughout Ohio’s history, there has been a steadfast conviction in the inherent freedom of all individuals, regardless of race or ethnic origin.

The first American colony was established at Marietta, Ohio, farther east along the river, in 1788, and its citizens prohibited slavery 15 years later, when the territory became a state in the United States of America.

See also:  How Many Sections Are In The Underground Railroad By Colson Whitehead? (Correct answer)

When driving along the lake, the rich history of the area along that border is completely obscured by the present-day landscape.

I traveled through a town named Utopia, which, judging by its boarded-up windows and deafening silence, appeared to be everything but.

The Confederate flag was flying somewhere in the vicinity, and I happened to see it.

That flag, which was flying so close to the river, reflected both the success and the failure of abolition.

However, it also means that even in Ohio, the flag of the rebel army, which fought for the right to keep people in bondage, is still flown at half mast.

Although the whole United States of America is a free state, it is nonetheless polluted by the remnants of an institution that the state’s early immigrants recognized as being a sin.

Rankin House

Above: The north side of Rankin House as it appears now, having been restored to its original character and structural integrity. Consider yourself an escaped slave making your way up through Kentucky. Bounty hunters are familiar with all of the hiding places and are on the lookout for a reward for bringing you back. You’ve made it to the banks of the magnificent Ohio River, but what do you do next? You can see a light high up on the other side of the hill on the Ohio side, flashing out like a beacon against the night sky, from where you are perched on the Ohio side of the hill.

  1. Even on the Ohio side of the river, gaining freedom included a significant amount of risk.
  2. It was possible to capture escaping slaves by whatever means necessary, sometimes dead or alive, and return them to their former masters in exchange for a payment to those who were ready to do so.
  3. The bounty hunters were fully aware of this, and they were on the prowl at all times.
  4. John Rankin was just one of them.
  5. The runaway slaves were alerted that it was safe for them to cross the river at night by raising a lamp to the top of a 30′ tall flag pole in his front yard, which served as a signal to them that people would be ready to assist them.
  6. At one point, as many as 12 slaves were concealed in the Rankin home at the same time.
  7. While the majority of activists working to free slaves kept their activities hidden, John Rankin was an outlier.
  8. That is not to argue that he put their safety at risk; rather, it is to state that he was forthright in his support for runaways.
  9. When runaways were in his fields, John Rankin took extraordinary pains to keep them safe, even when bloodhounds were in his fields trying to hunt down the runaways.
  10. In a manner, it was a proclamation that John Rankin would not be intimidated by federal laws or bounty hunters on the lookout for fugitive criminals.
  11. While commanding a band of raiders across southern Ohio in 1863, Confederate Brigadier-General John Morgan had as one of his objectives the destruction of “the hell-hole of Ripley,” and especially the death of John Rankin.

Morgan’s raiders made it as close as one mile to Ripley before being forced to turn around and forsake any prospect of bringing about the abolition of slavery in this thorn in the side of the South.

JohnJean Rankin

While attending Washington College in Jonesborough, Tennessee, John Rankin met and married Jean Lowry, whom he married before graduating from the college. He was ordained as a Presbyterian preacher in 1814. Consequently, he embarked on a lifelong path that would see him not just speaking against slavery, but also turning his lectures into action. In the following several years, John Rankin and his wife would go on a journey northward toward Ripley, where he had heard that some Virginians who were opposed to slavery had established themselves.

  1. His anti-slavery ideas continued to be propagated as he traveled from town to town, and he delivered sermons even when traveling through slave states.
  2. The time John and his wife arrived in Ripley on New Year’s Eve in 1821, they had three sons and one daughter.
  3. The Ohio Anti-Slavery Society was founded in Zanesville, Ohio, and Rankin had his first significant contact with mob hostility to his work while in town for the founding of the organization.
  4. When he stopped in Chillicothe on his way home to give a speech at a church, stones were thrown through the windows.
  5. Ripley’s earliest house, constructed in 1822 by John Rankin, may be seen above.
  6. The relatively big house was really three separate flats, with the Rankin family residing in one and him renting out the other two units to different people.
  7. He then chose to build a new mansion at the top of Liberty Hill that was further away from the Ohio River, provided him with a greater view of the countryside, including Kentucky, and served as a focal point for the runaway slaves.
  8. Overlooking Ripley’s Maplewood Cemetery, in May 1892, a memorial ceremony was held in honor of Rankin, who had swiftly gained notoriety as a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad.
  9. John Rankin and his wife, Jean Lowrey, were memorialized with a monument, “Freedom’s Heroes,” on the grounds of the Maplewood Cemetery in Ripley, Ohio, six years after their deaths in 1886.

Underground Railroad station

While attending Washington College in Jonesborough, Tennessee, John Rankin met and married Jean Lowry, whom he married before graduating from the institution. As a Presbyterian pastor, he was ordained in the year 1814. In this way, he began a lifelong career of not just speaking against slavery, but also putting his lectures into action to make a difference. After several years, John Rankin and his wife would begin their journey northward toward Ripley, where he had heard that some Virginians who were opposed to slavery had established a community.

  • His anti-slavery ideas continued to be propagated as he traveled from town to town, and he delivered sermons throughout slavery’s former territories.
  • The time John and his wife arrived in Ripley on New Year’s Eve in 1821, they had three sons and one daughter.
  • On his first significant encounter with mob hostility to his work, Rankin was pelted with rotten eggs in the town of Zanesville, Ohio, while in town for the creation of the Ohio Anti-Slavery Society.
  • He was not injured.
  • Building his first home near the Ohio River in 1822 earned him the title of landlord.
  • One of the three flats in the relatively big house housed the Rankin family, with the other two being rented out to different people.
  • When he reached the top of Liberty Hill, he planned to build a new residence so that he could be further away from the Ohio River, have a greater view of the surrounding land and even see into Kentucky, while also serving as a focal point for the escaping slaves.
  • Rankin immediately gained notoriety as a “conductor” on the Underground Railroad.

Six years after John Rankin’s death in 1886, a monument honoring John Rankin and his wife, Jean Lowrey, entitled “Freedom’s Heroes,” was built on the grounds of the Maplewood Cemetery in Ripley, Ohio, in honor of the couple.

Renovated Rankin House tells story of slaves running to freedom

Details discovered during the restoration process restore the building’s look to when it operated as a stop on the Underground Railroad. OUR ORIGINAL HISTORY RIPLEY, Ohio (AP) — The John Rankin House appears to be in like-new condition. At least, that’s how it appeared 185 years ago when the Rev. John Rankin, a Presbyterian pastor and outspoken abolitionist, opened his home as a temporary shelter for slaves trying to flee from Kentucky. Located on Liberty Hill in Ripley, Ohio, some 50 miles east of Cincinnati, the two-story home has undergone extensive renovations on the outside as well as the interior, and it will be rededicated on Saturday, Aug.

  1. In the house, which is a National Historic Landmark, visitors will find the inside to be virtually unchanged from when the Rankins resided there.
  2. Running slaves crossing the Ohio River relied on a light in the window for navigational guidance.
  3. According to the Ohio History Connection, formerly the Ohio Historical Society, which has owned the site since 1938, the Rev.
  4. Rankin’s family.
  5. Efforts were taken to make the home as true as possible to the time between the 1830s and the 1840s in which it was built.

According to Betty Campbell, the site manager and president of Ripley Heritage Inc., the nonprofit organization that manages the home, “methods of study are substantially different today than they were in 1948 for restoration.” The exposed brick facade of the home was subjected to paint analysis, which revealed that it had been painted twice, first in brownish red and subsequently in ochre.

To determine the architectural elements of the home, Chris Buchanan, project manager from the Ohio History Connection, played the role of a “detective architect.” In order to figure out what sort of locks were used, he looked at the outline left on the original front door.

“The stenciling is the great surprise,” Buchanan remarked of the project.

The door frame molding was removed in order to reinstate the original single door, showing an area of wallpaper beneath it.

Researchers discovered a few houses in New York State from the same time period with stenciling designs that matched the ones they were looking for, and they were able to replicate them.

Her crew took great care in measuring and painting the stencils by hand.

Visitors will be able to compare the original stenciling with the new décor because a sample of the old stenciling has been preserved.

Telling stories about ‘Eliza’ and fighting off bounty hunters are two of my favorite things to do.

During this time period, two incidences happened on the premises that are the subject of this report.

It was told to family friend Harriet Beecher Stowe, who adapted it for the character Eliza in her 1852 novel “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” which played a role in influencing public opinion on slavery.

Rankin and his son, Adam Lowry Rankin, both described in their autobiographies of protecting their house against bounty hunters in 1841, a year in which they were born.

Jean Rankin’s contributions are often underestimated.

When it comes to the remodeling, Bartlett admits that he isn’t sure how true it is, but that they are trying their best to convey the tale.

When: Saturday, Aug.

Open every weekend from the first weekend in May until the end of October, 10 a.m.

Wednesday through Saturday, 12 p.m.

Sunday Admission is $4; students in grades K-12 are $2; children under 5 are free; and Ohio History Connection members are free.

For further information, call 937-392-1627 or 800-752-2705, or visit the Ohio History Connection website at: RANKIN HOUSE IS LOCATED ON RANKIN STREET “publishdate=”2014-08-18 17:38:42 +0000 UTC” updateddate=”2014-08-18 17:46:36 +0000 UTC” slot=”timestamp” publishdate=”2014-08-18 17:38:42 +0000 UTC”>

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *