Where Did The Underground Railroad Stop In Jonesboro, Arkansas? (Question)

What is the history of railroads in Arkansas?

  • Railroads here have their history dating back to January 10, 1853 when the Memphis Little Rock chartered by the state of Arkansas. It first completed a 38-mile line connecting Hopefield (near Memphis) and Madison (the railroad‘s first train also pulled six bales of cotton).

Was there an underground railroad in Arkansas?

“And the truth is, if it weren’t for the desire for freedom of African-American slaves, there wouldn’t have been any Underground Railroad.” Arkansas was a late bloomer as a slave state, compared with other states to the east.

Where did the Underground Railroad begin and end?

These were called “stations,” “safe houses,” and “depots.” The people operating them were called “stationmasters.” There were many well-used routes stretching west through Ohio to Indiana and Iowa. Others headed north through Pennsylvania and into New England or through Detroit on their way to Canada.

How do I find out if my house was part of the Underground Railroad?

1) Check the date when the house was built.

  1. Check the date when the house was built.
  2. At your county clerk’s office, or wherever historical deeds are stored in your locality, research the property to determine who owned it between the American Revolution and the Civil War (roughly 1790-1860).

Where were the stations on the Underground Railroad?

In the decades leading up to the American Civil War, settlements along the Detroit and Niagara Rivers were important terminals of the Underground Railroad. By 1861, some 30,000 freedom seekers resided in what is now Ontario, having escaped slave states like Kentucky and Virginia.

Where is the underground railroad Fallout 4?

The Old North Church is the last spot on Fallout 4’s Freedom Trail, with the Railroad residing within. You’ll have to clear the place of some Feral Ghouls, then head to the basement, which can be found to the back right upon entering the church.

How many slaves escaped on the Underground Railroad?

The total number of runaways who used the Underground Railroad to escape to freedom is not known, but some estimates exceed 100,000 freed slaves during the antebellum period.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

How does Underground Railroad end?

In the end, Royal is killed and a grief-stricken Cora is caught again by Ridgeway. Ridgeway forces Cora to take him to an Underground Railroad station, but as they climb down the entrance’s rope ladder she pulls Ridgeway off and they fall to the ground.

Where did Harriet Tubman escaped to?

In 1849, Tubman escaped to Philadelphia, only to return to Maryland to rescue her family soon after.

What happened to Cesar in the Underground Railroad?

While the show doesn’t show us what happens after their encounter, Caesar comes to Cora in a dream later, confirming to viewers that he was killed. In the novel, Caesar faces a similar fate of being killed following his capture, though instead of Ridgeway and Homer, he is killed by an angry mob.

Were quilts used in the Underground Railroad?

Two historians say African American slaves may have used a quilt code to navigate the Underground Railroad. Quilts with patterns named “wagon wheel,” “tumbling blocks,” and “bear’s paw” appear to have contained secret messages that helped direct slaves to freedom, the pair claim.

How many stops were there on the Underground Railroad?

6 Stops on the Underground Railroad. The Underground Railroad was a network of people who hid fugitives from slavery in their homes during the day. At night they moved them north to free states, Canada or England. Refugees naturally headed for New England.

What happened during the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. Involvement with the Underground Railroad was not only dangerous, but it was also illegal. The safe houses used as hiding places along the lines of the Underground Railroad were called stations.

What year did the Underground Railroad take place?

system used by abolitionists between 1800-1865 to help enslaved African Americans escape to free states.

The flight to freedom – Network to freedom

Every elementary school student is familiar with the stories of the Underground Railroad: tales of Harriet Tubman’s daring trips south to lead more slaves to freedom, of kindly white Northern abolitionists hiding fugitives in hidden cellar rooms, and ushering them down secret passageways to freedom. But what about the real story of the Underground Railroad? However, it turns out that such stories are merely a pale, one-dimensional, mythologized depiction of people and what made up the Underground Railroad in the first place.

The Underground Railroad was far more extensive and less formal than the memoirs of its conductors imply, according to historians.

Since the mid-1990s, the National Park Service has been attempting to retrieve and preserve this greater story through various means.

In the words of James Hill, regional director of the Network to Freedom area, which includes Arkansas: “This initiative is unlike anything else the Park Service has done before.” In the meantime, no land base or specific location has been established.” Hill said that the Network is structured in the same way as the National Register of Historic Places.

  • So far, there are more than 125 of them spread over 25 states and the District of Columbia.
  • However, they just reveal a portion of the story.
  • Runaways are mentioned in a few historical accounts of slavery in the state, but no one has ever taken the time to sit down and really research the issue.
  • With the support of the National Park Service, Bolton will carry out a three-year investigation into the state’s runaway slave phenomena, including how many there were and who they were, where they came from and where they were going, how they traveled, and who could have assisted them.
  • “And the reality is that if it hadn’t been for the longing for liberation of African-American slaves, there would have been no Underground Railroad,” says the author.
  • However, when the boom arrived, it came in a huge way: the slave population increased from around 20,000 in 1840 to 111,115 in only 20 years.
  • Part of Bolton’s responsibilities will include distinguishing between fact and fiction.
  • Minnis was a slave in Kentucky whose master, according to Fairbanks, left Minnis his freedom when he died, which Minnis took advantage of.
  • As recounted in his autobiography, Fairbanks flew from Ohio to rescue Minnis; with the assistance of a wig and false moustache provided by a friendly French barber, Fairbanks disguised Minnis, passed him off as a “Mr.

Bolton described the scenario as “a fantastic but doubtful one.” As Fairbanks points out in his book, much of what the general public knows about the Underground Railroad comes from memoirs like his own, which were published by white, Northern abolitionists in the late nineteenth century with little or no evidence to back them up.

According to Bolton, “my strategy is to start from the bottom up and attempt to grasp the broad nature of runaway slave behavior, then work my way up from there and try to nail down stories like Fairbanks’.” In addition to providing some of the best information – age, gender, physical description and possible destinations – newspaper ads for runaway slaves are also some of the most objective writing about slaves by Southern whites, according to Bolton, because they had a financial incentive to be as accurate as possible rather than perpetuating the image of slaves as lazy, slow, and in need of their masters’ benevolent protection.

  • According to runaway advertisements, they are smart, capable of changing themselves and escaping pursuers, able to pass themselves off as preachers, and even conversant in another language.
  • on Sunday last, two NEGRO MEN of the following descriptions, viz.
  • He is a kind and considerate young man.
  • it appears that they will fight any attempt to seize them until there is a demonstration of sufficient force to defeat them.
  • Between 1820, when the Arkansas Gazette first began publishing, until 1863, the Arkansas Gazette alone featured advertisements for 483 businesses.
  • One in every twenty-five participants was a youngster under the age of ten.
  • According to Bolton, the advertisements do not cover every single slave who has escaped in Arkansas.
See also:  How Does An Underground Railroad Work?

Escape was a common bargaining tactic.

Despite the fact that Bolton has not yet discovered any secret hideaways or underground passageways, there are certain well-known Arkansas runaways, such as Nelson Hacket, whose story might lead to the discovery of potential places for the Network to Freedom.

He worked as Wallace’s faithful valet and butler for a year before staging a perfectly planned escape from the prison in July 1841.

He crossed the Mississippi River on a ferry that was manned by another black man, who assisted him in obtaining transportation to Kentucky and gave him advice on the best route to follow.

During this time he claimed to be a free black man while at other times admitting his predicament to other black people or to whites he believed would be of assistance, he was sometimes arrested and sometimes released from prison.

His whereabouts were discovered in a colony of black immigrants barely 50 miles across the border from Detroit, and he was apprehended in early September on theft charges.

Wallace had the law on his side when he obtained an indictment against Hacket in Arkansas as a thief rather than as a fugitive slave, according to the Extradition Treaty between the United States and Canada.

He was detained in a Detroit jail until May, when two white men traveling from Arkansas arrived to claim him from there.

He was apprehended within a few of days, and he was ultimately apprehended and returned to Arkansas in June.

However, his experience – which has been documented in court documents as well as Canadian and British legislative records – may represent Arkansas’s greatest hope to become a member of the Network of Freedom.

The onset of the Civil War in Arkansas opened the door to new chances for slaves who want to emancipate themselves.

That was changed, however, when the Emancipation Proclamation was issued, and as the Union army marched south into Arkansas, slaves merely only to slip across the border into Union territory to be released from slavery.

With the progress of Dr.

“I’m confident that there will be people in Arkansas who will be able to contribute to the story, both black and white,” Hill predicted.

The Mary Meachum Freedom Crossing, where Meachum, the widow of a black pastor, assisted eight or nine slaves in crossing the Mississippi River in 1855, and the Old Courthouse, where Dred Scott sued for his and his wife’s freedom in 1847, are two of the city’s most notable attractions.

The Forks in the Road slave market, which was once one of the largest in the South, is located in Natchez, Mississippi. In addition, Dover, Tenn., is home to the Fort Donelson National Battlefield, which was the site of the first significant Union victory during the Civil War.

The Underground Railroad Route

Students will learn how to distinguish between slave states and free states during the time of the Underground Railroad, as well as the difficulties of escaping and choosing the path they would have chosen. Geography, Human Geography, and Physical Geography are the subjects covered. Students should be able to distinguish between slave and free states throughout the time of the Underground Railroad. Each pupil should be given a copy of the map titled “Routes to Freedom.” Inform pupils that the Underground Railroad aided enslaved individuals as they traveled from the South to the North during the American Civil War.

Afterwards, instruct pupils to locate each slave state on the map as you pronounce its name:

  • Alabama
  • sArkansas
  • sDelaware
  • sFlorida
  • sGeorgia
  • sKentucky
  • sLouisiana
  • sMaryland
  • sMississippi
  • sMissouri
  • sMontana This state does not display on the map since it is not included in the list. Make use of a wall map of the United States to instruct children on where Montana is located.) North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia are among the states represented.

Explain to pupils that enslaved individuals did not have access to maps, compasses, or GPS systems throughout their time in slavery. The majority of enslaved individuals were never permitted to get an education, and as a result, they were unable to read or write. Consider the following question: How do you suppose enslaved people knew they were heading in the correct direction? Students should be informed that enslaved individuals resorted to guides on the Underground Railroad, as well as memory, visuals, and spoken communication to survive.

  1. Talk about the difficulties you’ve encountered on your path.
  2. Instruct pupils to examine the map and make note of any physical characteristics of the region that made the voyage challenging.
  3. In order to demonstrate proper shading techniques, students should go to Alabama, then northeast via Maine and into Canada to see how the Applachian Mountains are shaded.
  4. Ask:Can you think of anything else that made the travel difficult?
  • In the winter, being cold and outdoors
  • Not having enough food
  • Being exhausted yet unable to relax
  • Having to swim or traverse bodies of water
  • Having to travel great distances
  • Evading or avoiding people or animals

3. Ask pupils to identify the route they would have chosen if they were in their shoes. Students should be divided into small groups. Ask each group to look at the map and choose the route they would have gone to freedom if they had been able to do so. Students should choose their selections based on the states, rivers, and mountain ranges that they would have to cover on their journey. Ask each group to describe the path they would have followed and why they would have done so.

Informal Assessment

Students should discuss what they believe to be the most difficult obstacles to fleeing enslaved people, such as distance, weather, mountains, wildlife, bodies of water, or densely inhabited places, among other things. Inquire as to how their chosen method might have assisted enslaved individuals in avoiding the difficulties they were faced with.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to:

  • The student will be able to identify slave states and free states during the time period when the Underground Railroad was active
  • Describe the difficulties encountered throughout the voyage
  • Indicate the path they would have followed, and explain their reasons.

Teaching Approach

  • Common Core Standard 1: How to interpret and share information via the use of maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technology, and spatial thinking
  • Standard 17: How to use geography to understand and interpret the past.

What You’ll Need

  • Standard 1: How to comprehend and share information by utilizing maps and other geographic representations, geospatial technology, and spatial thinking. The application of geography in the interpretation of the past is covered in Standard 17.

Required Technology

  • Internet access is optional
  • Technological setup includes one computer per classroom and a projector.

Physical Space

With the exception of promotional graphics, which normally link to another page that carries the media credit, all audio, artwork, photos, and videos are attributed beneath the media asset they are associated with.

In the case of media, the Rights Holder is the individual or group that gets credited.

Writer

Naomi Friedman holds a Master’s degree in political science.

Editor

Christina Riska Simmons is a model and actress.

Educator Reviewer

Jessica Wallace-Weaver is a certified educational consultant.

Sources

  • Based on the National Geographic Xpeditions lesson “Finding Your Way: The Underground Railroad,” this activity was created. Permissions Granted to Users Users’ permissions are detailed in our Terms of Service, which you can see by clicking here. Alternatively, if you have any issues regarding how to reference something from our website in your project or classroom presentation, please speak with your instructor. They will be the most knowledgeable about the selected format. When you contact them, you will need to provide them with the page title, URL, and the date on which you visited the item.
See also:  What Role Does The Underground Railroad Play In The Present? (Correct answer)

Media

Based on the National Geographic Xpeditions lesson “Finding Your Way: The Underground Railroad,” this activity was adapted. Permissions Granted to Individual Users Please see our Terms of Service for more details on user permissions. If you have any issues regarding how to properly reference something from our website in your project or classroom presentation, please speak with your instructor or a librarian. Most likely, they will be the ones who are most familiar with the recommended format The title of the page, the URL of the resource, as well as the date you visited it, will be necessary when you contact them.

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Students create QR code scavenger hunt for Black History Month

JONESBORO, Ark. (KAIT) – The city of Jonesboro, Arkansas, has a new mayor. A student-led project at Jonesboro High School’s EAST program developed an interactive tool to educate people about African-American history. For the month of February, JHS STEM students developed a QR code treasure hunt centered on the Underground Railroad and Harriet Tubman. Ten clues were concealed throughout the campus, and players may use their phones to scan the codes to access movies, quizzes, and other information by scanning the codes.

  • The student said that she had always wished to figure out a method to transform the school into an Underground Railroad station.
  • “It allows you to understand more about history, particularly Black history,” Williams explained.
  • Participation in the scavenger hunt was open to both kids and instructors.
  • KAIT is the owner of the copyright for the year 2021.

Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad was a network of people, both black and white, who helped escaped enslaved persons from the southern United States by providing them with refuge and assistance. It came forth as a result of the convergence of numerous separate covert initiatives. Although the exact dates of its inception are unknown, it was active from the late 18th century until the Civil War, after which its attempts to weaken the Confederacy were carried out in a less-secretive manner until the Civil War ended.

Quaker Abolitionists

The Society of Friends (Quakers) is often regarded as the first organized group to actively assist escaped enslaved persons. In 1786, George Washington expressed dissatisfaction with Quakers for attempting to “liberate” one of his enslaved servants. Abolitionist and Quaker Isaac T. Hopper established a network in Philadelphia in the early 1800s to assist enslaved persons who were on the run from slavery. Abolitionist organisations founded by Quakers in North Carolina lay the basis for escape routes and safe havens for fugitive slaves during the same time period.

The African Methodist Episcopal Church, which was founded in 1816, was another religious organization that took a proactive role in assisting escaping enslaved persons.

What Was the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was first mentioned in 1831, when an enslaved man named Tice Davids managed to escape from Kentucky into Ohio and his master blamed a “underground railroad” for assisting Davids in his liberation. When a fugitive slave called Jim was apprehended in 1839 in Washington, the press said that the guy confessed his plan to travel north along a “underground railroad to Boston” while under torture. The Vigilance Committees, which were established in New York in 1835 and Philadelphia in 1838 to safeguard escaped enslaved persons from bounty hunters, rapidly expanded their duties to include guiding enslaved individuals on the run.

MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: Harriet Tubman and her fellow fugitives used the following strategies to escape through the Underground Railroad:

How the Underground Railroad Worked

The majority of enslaved persons aided by the Underground Railroad were able to flee to neighboring states like as Kentucky, Virginia, and Maryland. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 made catching fugitive enslaved persons a lucrative industry in the deep South, and there were fewer hiding places for them as a result of the Act. The majority of fugitive enslaved people were on their own until they reached specific places farther north. The escaping enslaved people were escorted by individuals known as “conductors.” Private residences, churches, and schools were also used as hiding places throughout the war.

The personnel in charge of running them were referred to as “stationmasters.” There were several well-traveled roads that ran west through Ohio and into Indiana and Iowa.

The Little-Known Underground Railroad That Ran South to Mexico.

Fugitive Slave Acts

The Fugitive Slave Acts were a major cause for many fugitive slaves to flee to Canada. This legislation, which was passed in 1793, authorized local governments to catch and extradite fugitive enslaved individuals from inside the borders of free states back to their places of origin, as well as to penalize anybody who assisted the fleeing enslaved people. Personal Liberty Laws were introduced in certain northern states to fight this, but they were overturned by the Supreme Court in 1842. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was intended to reinforce the preceding legislation, which was perceived by southern states to be insufficiently enforced at the time of passage.

The northern states were still considered a danger zone for fugitives who had managed to flee.

Some Underground Railroad operators chose to station themselves in Canada and sought to assist fugitives who were arriving to settle in the country.

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was the most well-known conductor of the Underground Railroad during its heyday. When she and two of her brothers fled from a farm in Maryland in 1849, she was given the name Harriet (her married name was Tubman). She was born Araminta Ross, and she was raised as Harriet Tubman. They returned a couple of weeks later, but Tubman fled on her own again shortly after, this time making her way to the state of Pennsylvania. In following years, Tubman returned to the plantation on a number of occasions to rescue family members and other individuals.

Tubman was distraught until she had a vision of God, which led her to join the Underground Railroad and begin escorting other fugitive slaves to the Maryland state capital.

Frederick Douglass

In his house in Rochester, New York, former enslaved person and celebrated author Frederick Douglasshid fugitives who were assisting 400 escapees in their journey to freedom in Canada. Reverend Jermain Loguen, a former fugitive who lived in the adjacent city of Syracuse, assisted 1,500 escapees on their journey north. The Vigilance Committee was established in Philadelphia in 1838 by Robert Purvis, an escaped enslaved person who later became a trader. Josiah Henson, a former enslaved person and railroad operator, founded the Dawn Institute in Ontario in 1842 to assist fugitive slaves who made their way to Canada in learning the necessary skills to find work.

Agent,” according to the document.

John Parker was a free Black man living in Ohio who worked as a foundry owner and who used his rowboat to ferry fugitives over the Ohio River.

William Still was a notable Philadelphia citizen who was born in New Jersey to runaway slaves parents who fled to Philadelphia as children.

Who Ran the Underground Railroad?

The vast majority of Underground Railroad operators were regular individuals, including farmers and business owners, as well as preachers and religious leaders. Some affluent individuals were active, including Gerrit Smith, a billionaire who stood for president on two separate occasions. Smith acquired a full family of enslaved people from Kentucky in 1841 and freed them from their captivity. Levi Coffin, a Quaker from North Carolina, is credited with being one of the first recorded individuals to assist escaped enslaved persons.

Coffin stated that he had discovered their hiding spots and had sought them out in order to assist them in moving forward.

Finally, they were able to make their way closer to him. Coffin eventually relocated to Indiana and then Ohio, where he continued to assist fugitive enslaved individuals no matter where he was.

John Brown

Abolitionist John Brown worked as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, and it was at this time that he founded the League of Gileadites, which was dedicated to assisting fleeing enslaved individuals in their journey to Canada. Abolitionist John Brown would go on to play a variety of roles during his life. His most well-known duty was conducting an assault on Harper’s Ferry in order to raise an armed army that would march into the deep south and free enslaved people at gunpoint. Ultimately, Brown’s forces were beaten, and he was executed for treason in 1859.

  1. The year 1844, he formed a partnership with Vermont schoolteacher Delia Webster, and the two were jailed for assisting an escaped enslaved lady and her young daughter.
  2. Charles Torrey was sentenced to six years in jail in Maryland for assisting an enslaved family in their attempt to flee through Virginia.
  3. After being apprehended in 1844 while transporting a boatload of freed slaves from the Caribbean to the United States, Massachusetts sea captain Jonathan Walker was sentenced to prison for life.
  4. John Fairfield of Virginia turned down the opportunity to assist in the rescue of enslaved individuals who had been left behind by their families as they made their way north.
  5. He managed to elude capture twice.
See also:  Where Were The Major Stations Of The Underground Railroad? (Perfect answer)

End of the Line

Operation of the Underground Railroad came to an end in 1863, during the American Civil War. In actuality, its work was shifted aboveground as part of the Union’s overall campaign against the Confederate States of America. Once again, Harriet Tubman made a crucial contribution by organizing intelligence operations and serving as a commanding officer in Union Army efforts to rescue the liberated enslaved people who had been freed. MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: Harriet Tubman led a daring Civil War raid after the Underground Railroad was shut down.

Sources

During the American Civil War, the Underground Railroad came to an end about 1863. When it came to the Union fight against the Confederacy, its activity was carried out aboveground. This time around, Harriet Tubman played a critical role in the Union Army’s efforts to rescue the recently liberated enslaved people by conducting intelligence operations and serving in the role of leadership.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE READ THESE STATEMENTS. Harriet Tubman Led a Brutal Civil War Raid Following the Underground Railroad.

Pathways to Freedom

The Underground Railroad was a route from slavery to freedom in the north. It is possible that travellers will be halted when they reach a free state such as Pennsylvania, New Jersey, or Ohio, although this is rare. After 1850, the majority of enslaved individuals who managed to flee made it all the way to Canada. They needed to travel to Canada in order to ensure their own safety. The reason for this was because in 1850, the United States Congress approved a statute known as the Fugitive Slave Act, which prohibited the sale of slaves abroad.

  1. Church in Philadelphia served as a vital station on the Underground Railroad as the “passengers” made their way north to freedom during the American Revolution.
  2. The Fugitive Slave Act was passed as part of the agreement.
  3. Most persons who want to flee the United States walked all the way to Canada after 1850 since it was unsafe to remain in free states such as Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, and even Massachusetts.
  4. What routes did the Underground Railroad take across Maryland, and how did they differ from one another?

Civil War on the Western Border: The Missouri-Kansas Conflict, 1854-1865

Running away slaves from slave states to the North and Canada were assisted by white and African American abolitionists, who set up a network of hiding sites around the country where fugitives could conceal themselves during the day and move under cover of night. In spite of the fact that the majority of runaways preferred to travel on foot and trains were rarely used, the secret network was referred to as the “Underground Railroad” by all parties involved. The term first appeared in literature in 1852, when Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote about a secret “underground” line in her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

  • Those working in the Underground Railroad utilized code terms to keep their identities hidden from others.
  • While traveling on the Underground Railroad, both runaways and conductors had to endure terrible conditions, harsh weather, and acute starvation.
  • Many were willing to put their lives on the line, especially after the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act made it illegal to provide assistance to escaped slaves, even in free areas.
  • At the time, an abolitionist came to the conclusion that “free colored people shared equal fate with the breathless and the slave.” Listen to a tape of filmmaker Gary Jenkins talking on the Underground Railroad in the West at the Kansas City Public Library in Kansas City, Missouri.
  • Underground Railroad routes that extended into Kansas and branched out into northern states like as Iowa and Nebraska, as well as all the way into Canada, were often utilized by the fugitives.

When asked about his feelings on doing so much good for the oppressed while doing so much harm to the oppressors, one conductor from Wakarusa, Kansas, responded, “I feel pretty happy and thankfullthat I have been able to do so much good for the oppressed, so much harm to the oppressors.” It was not uncommon for well-known persons to be connected with the Underground Railroad, such as Harriet Tubman, who escaped slavery and then returned 19 times to the South to help emancipate over 300 slaves.

  • Tubman was said to have carried a revolver in order to guarantee that she never lost track of a passenger.
  • Individuals from Kansas also played significant roles, such as Enoch and Luther Platt, who managed railroad stations out of their house in Wabaunsee County, Kansas Territory, in the 1850s.
  • It is possible for “shareholders” to make donations to such groups, which may be used to supply supplies or to construct additional lines.
  • In addition to developing new routes, members of assistance organisations evaluated the routes to ensure that men, women, and children could travel in safety on them.

During an escape, engineers guided passengers and notified the remainder of the train to reroute if there was a threat to the train’s integrity. The Underground Railroad: A Deciphering Guide

  • The Underground Railroad, also known as the Freedom or Gospel Train
  • Cargo, passengers, or luggage: fugitives from justice
  • The StationorDepot is a safe haven for fugitives from slavery. A person who escorted fugitive slaves between stations was known as a conductor, engineer, agent, or shepherd. The term “stationmaster” refers to someone who oversaw a station and assisted runaways along their path. shareholder or stockholder: an abolitionist who made financial donations to the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War

Conductors from Kansas may easily cross the border into Missouri in order to establish contact with suspected runaway passengers. During the war, slaves residing in Missouri, which was so near to the free state of Kansas, were especially enticed to utilize the Underground Railroad to cross the border into the free state of Kansas to escape. Despite the fact that he did not know exact ways into Kansas, one African-American man expressed his confidence in his ability to reach Lawrence, a town around 40 miles from the state line and home to “the Yankees,” which means “the Yankees are waiting for you.” Conductors frequently provided fugitives with clothing and food for their excursions, and even did it at their own expense on occasion.

Due to the possibility of being questioned by pursuers, several conductors preferred not to know specific information about the fugitives they assisted.

In the aftermath of their successful escapes to other free states, a small number of passengers returned to Kansas, including William Dominick Matthews, a first lieutenant in the Independent Battery of the United States Colored Light Artillery in Fort Leavenworth.

Matthews maintained a boarding house in Leavenworth, Kansas, with the assistance of Daniel R.

Anthony.

Aside from that, as could be expected, very little is known about the specific individuals and families that aided or were assisted by the Underground Railroad.

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