Where Was The Underground Railroad In Burke Va?

What was the Underground Railroad in Virginia?

  • The Underground Railroad in Virginia was a series of secret networks, often working independently of one another and manned by both free blacks and whites, designed to help enslaved African Americans escape to the North and to Canada.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Virginia?

From Virginia to Canada. Several factors made Virginia a place where the Underground Railroad flourished. Even with the domestic slave trade forcing thousands of men, women, and children into the Deep South, it had the largest enslaved population of any state and a large free black population.

Where were the underground railroads located?

There were many well-used routes stretching west through Ohio to Indiana and Iowa. Others headed north through Pennsylvania and into New England or through Detroit on their way to Canada.

What is the path of the Underground Railroad?

Routes. Underground Railroad routes went north to free states and Canada, to the Caribbean, into United States western territories, and Indian territories. Some freedom seekers (escaped slaves) travelled South into Mexico for their freedom.

How far north did the Underground Railroad go?

Because it was dangerous to be in free states like Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Ohio, or even Massachusetts after 1850, most people hoping to escape traveled all the way to Canada. So, you could say that the Underground Railroad went from the American south to Canada.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

Where did the Underground Railroad have safe houses?

In the years leading up to the Civil War, the black abolitionist William Still offered shelter to hundreds of freedom seekers as they journeyed northward.

How far did the Underground Railroad stretch?

The length of the route to freedom varied but was often 500 to 600 miles. Those who were strong—and lucky—might make it to freedom in as little as two months. For others, the journey could last more than a year. Harriet Tubman was one of the most famous conductors along the Underground Railroad.

Was the Underground Railroad an actual railroad?

Nope! Despite its name, the Underground Railroad wasn’t a railroad in the way Amtrak or commuter rail is. It wasn’t even a real railroad. The Underground Railroad of history was simply a loose network of safe houses and top secret routes to states where slavery was banned.

What year did the Underground Railroad take place?

system used by abolitionists between 1800-1865 to help enslaved African Americans escape to free states.

How many Underground Railroad routes were there?

There were four main routes that the enslaved could follow: North along the Mississippi and Ohio rivers to the northern United States and Canada; South to Florida and refuge with the Seminole Indians and to the Bahamas; West along the Gulf of Mexico and into Mexico; and East along the seaboard into Canada.

Where can you visit the Underground Railroad?

NEW YORK

  • Harriet Tubman Home for the Aged, Residence and Thompson AME Zion Church–Auburn.
  • St.
  • Gerrit Smith Estate and Land Office–Peterboro.
  • John Brown Farm and Gravesite–Lake Placid.
  • Foster Memorial AME Zion Church–Tarrytown.
  • Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims–Brooklyn.
  • Asa and Caroline Wing House–Oswego.
  • Edwin W.

Where did Harriet Tubman start the Underground Railroad?

Born into slavery in Maryland, Harriet Tubman escaped to freedom in the North in 1849 to become the most famous “conductor” on the Underground Railroad. Tubman risked her life to lead hundreds of family members and other slaves from the plantation system to freedom on this elaborate secret network of safe houses.

Black History in #FXVA: Sully and the Underground Railroad

In the United States, the Fairfax County Park Authority is one of the most well-known park systems in the country. Visitor and resident alike will benefit from theirfacilities, golf courses, trails, parks, and programs and events, which provide fantastic opportunity to exercise, or simply get outside and interact with history and nature. One of the Park Authority’s particular specializations is portraying the narrative of Fairfax County through a range of historic sites, which is one of its most distinctive features.

Sully will interpret the life of enslaved Black people at the old plantation with a unique experience they’re calling The Forgotten Road Tour, which will take place in the middle of March.

Shared Stories

In the United States, the Fairfax County Park Authority is one of the most renowned park systems in the country. Visiting or residing in the area can take advantage of the many possibilities to get outside and connect with history or environment provided by its facilities, golf courses, trails, parks, and many events and activities. When it comes to conveying the narrative of Fairfax County through a range of historic places, the Park Authority has a few things to offer that no other agency can match.

During a unique experience called The Forgotten Road Tour, which will debut in mid-March, Sully will portray the life of enslaved Black people at the old plantation.

The Forgotten Road Tour

Sully Historic Site’s Slave Quarters are a good example of this. This is a fantastic chance for those of us who are seeking for things to do outside as the weather begins to warm up to take advantage of the opportunity to be outside while also learning something. Forgotten Road is an outdoor walking tour that focuses on the lives and stories of African Americans who lived at Sully. Visitors will have the opportunity to travel through the property and visit various historic buildings, such as the kitchen/laundry, smokehouse, dairy, and the slave quarter cabin that serves as a representation of the slave quarter.

  1. on weekdays.
  2. Featured image courtesy of Don Sweeney is a writer who lives in New York City.
  3. While doing study at Sully in the 1980s, archeologists unearthed artifacts and information that now assist park administrators in telling more of the stories of individuals enslaved at Sully who resided near the south road during the late 18th century, according to the park’s website.
  4. Visitors may now discover the identities of the enslaved men, women, and children who lived at Sully and worked in these structures, as well as some of their background information.

Visitors may get a sense of the conditions under which the enslaved cook toiled by looking at the outdoor kitchen and realizing that food had to be cooked no matter how cold it was outside. This meant lighting a fire regardless of whether it was 20 degrees or 90 degrees outside.

The Underground Railroad Network to Freedom

Sully Historic Site is a replica of a slave quarters. As the weather begins to warm up, those of us who are searching for activities to do outside will find this a fantastic chance to get outside and learn something new at the same time! Forgotten Road is an outdoor walking tour that focuses on the lives and stories of African Americans who lived at Sully. Visitors will have the opportunity to travel through the property and visit various historic buildings, such as the kitchen/laundry, smokehouse, dairy, and the slave quarter cabin that serves as a representative of the slave quarter.

  1. Ticket prices are as follows: Adults $8.00/Children (ages 5-15) $7.00/Seniors (65 and over) $7.00/Students (16 and over) $7.00/Children under 5 are free The following link will take you to the registration page.
  2. Sully’s slave quarters were designed to be reflective of their time.
  3. These artefacts and pieces of knowledge are now being used by park management to convey the experiences of those enslaved at Sully who resided near the south road during the late 18th century.
  4. Visitors may now discover the names of the enslaved men, women, and children who lived at Sully and worked in these structures, as well as some of their backgrounds.
  5. In order to do this, a fire had to be built no matter how cold or hot the weather was.
See also:  What Do These Communities Suggest About Community Underground Railroad Book? (Question)
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Burke’s Station Historical Marker

Burke, Fairfax County, Virginia —The American South is located in Burke (Mid-Atlantic)

Wood Choppers and Teamsters

The 11th of September, 2015 Burke’s Station Marker (number 1) Inscription. During the Civil War, African American laborers cut wood and hauled it to Burke s Station, a key Federal timber transportation station located here on the OrangeAlexandria Railroad, which was an important Federal timber transportation station during the war. Wood choppers cut down thousands of acres of woods along the railroad in Fairfax County in order to supply the Union troops and engineers with timber for railroad ties, bridge trusses, stockades, and fuel.

  • When the United States Military Construction Corps constructed an extra siding here in 1863, it aided in the loading of lumber into railroad carriages.
  • The timber was transported here by army teamsters in mule-drawn carts.
  • In Alexandria, many of the wood choppers and teamsters were runaway slaves known as contrabands who had fled their homes in the surrounding areas.
  • Burke’s Station Marker was established on October 28, 1863, by Confederate guerillas2.
  • About 25 mules, a wagon master, and many contrabands were apprehended while at work in the area.
  • When the Confederates approached, they fired a salvo of shots, which drove them away.
  • Virginia Civil War Trails erected this monument.

There are several topic lists that include this historical landmark, including: African-Americans are a diverse group of people.

In addition, it is featured in the Virginia Civil War Trailsseries list of places to visit in the state.

Location.

38° 47.584′ N, 77° 16.343′ W.

The marker may be found on the right while heading south on Old Burke Lake Road, just south of Burke Road (Virginia Route 652), and on the left when traveling north.

To access the map, simply touch it.

To get directions, tap on the screen.

In addition to this marker, there are at least 8 more markers within walking distance of this landmark.

Burke’s Station Marker (about half a mile away); Ice House (approximately half a mile away); The Silas Burke House (approximately half a mile away); Windmill (approximately half a mile away); Wood Shed (approximately half a mile away); (approx.

To see a list and map of all the markers in Burke, please click here.

The monument features four photographs with captions.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress, an African American teamster lugging wood in Virginia Wood chopper huts on Orange County, California, courtesy of the United States Department of Agriculture.

The marker also shows a map of the surrounding region, with a red You Are Here star identifying the position of the marker on the map.

A detail of African American railroad workers taken from a photograph on a monument stone.

The most recent revision of this page was made on July 7, 2021.

On September 11, 2015, it was first submitted to the site. Since then, 1,219 people have visited this page, with 2 people having done so this year. Photos: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. All photos were provided on September 13, 2015. Bernard Fisher was the editor responsible for the publication of this page.

Burke Centre station – Wikipedia

Burke Centre
Burke Centre station in August 2010
Location 5671 Roberts Parkway,Burke, VirginiaUnited States
Coordinates 38°47′51″N77°17′54″W / 38.79750°N 77.29833°WCoordinates:38°47′51″N77°17′54″W / 38.79750°N 77.29833°W
Line(s) NSWashington District
Platforms 1side platform
Tracks 2
Bus stands 3
Connections Fairfax Connector: 495Metrobus: 17B, 17L
Construction
Parking 1516 spaces
Disabled access Yes
Other information
Station code BCV (Amtrak)
Fare zone 4 (VRE)
History
Opened June 22, 1992
Rebuilt 2006–2008
Passengers
2017 9,939 9.21% (Amtrak)
Services
Preceding station Amtrak Following station
ManassastowardRoanoke Northeast Regional AlexandriatowardBoston SouthorSpringfield
Preceding station Virginia Railway Express Following station
Manassas ParktowardBroad Run Manassas Line Rolling RoadtowardWashington, D.C.

Burke Centre station is a railway station in Burke Centre, Burke, Fairfax County, Virginia. It serves the communities of Burke and Burke Center. One daily AmtrakNortheast Regionalround trip as well as the Virginia Railway ExpressManassas Line service the station.

History

In August 2010, a Northeast Regionaltrain arrived at Burke Center station. On June 22, 1992, the station, along with the Manassas Line, was opened. A big parking garage and bus stops were constructed as part of a $28 million project that began in mid-2008. On October 1, 2009, one AmtrakNortheast Regionalround trip from Boston to Lynchburg was extended. Trains would stop for VRE passengers on the Fredericksburg Line, just as they do for Northeast Regional passengers on the Fredericksburg Line, according to a cross-honoring agreement between Amtrak and VRE.

Passing trains such as the Amtrak Cardinal and Crescent do not stop here.

References

On Wikimedia Commons, you may find images and videos related to the Burke Centre station.

  • Burke Centre, VA – Amtrak
  • Burke Centre VRE Station
  • Burke Centre (BCV) (one of Amtrak’s Great American Stations)
  • Burke Centre (BCV) (one of Amtrak’s Great American Stations).

Henry Robert Burke : Education : Underground Railroad : Lest We Forget

‘Henry Robert Burke,’ says the narrator.

HENRY ROBERT BURKEAuthor, Historian, Speaker/Lecturer: The Underground Railroad

The Ohio Bicentennial Commission has selected Henry Robert Burke to the Advisory Committee on the Underground Railroad and the American Civil War, which will be convened in the coming months. A commission established by the Ohio General Assembly and Governor George V. Voinovich to supervise the state’s bicentennial celebration in the year 2003 was established. In order to engage all Ohioans and give a better knowledge and respect of their state’s legacy and the achievements of its residents, the organization has established a mission statement.

  • He is a member of the American Legion.
  • He worked as a mining superintendent along the Ohio River from Mingo Junction in northern Ohio to Proctorville in southern Ohio, a distance of approximately 450 kilometers.
  • He has devoted the better part of his life to studying about and researching the history of the Underground Railroad and its abolitionists.
  • Burke has released three novels throughout his career.
  • When Mr.
  • It has taken many years of research in libraries and interviews with descendants of African American slaves, including his own relatives, to compile a body of knowledge on the history of the Underground Railroad that teaches, interprets, and protects that heritage.
  • Burke weaves the tapestry known as “The Freedom Trail,” which is widely considered to be the finest human rights tale ever told in the United States.
  • As he takes his audience on a journey through pain and immense delight, he guides them through captivating experiences that generate a new understanding of valiant individuals of all races, both black and white, who gave their life for the right of all people to be free.
  • Burke on his appointment and are confident that he will do all in his power to promote history, particularly as it applies to southeastern Ohio.
  • Tags: This page does not have any tags associated with it.

Other related topics, key words, and phrases include:1787,1865,2003,Civil War,Henry Robert Burke,Ohio,Ohio Bicentennial Commission,Railroad,The Freedom Trail, and Underground Railroad.

Burke’s Station

He has been assigned to the Advisory Committee of the Underground Railroad and the American Civil War by the Ohio Bicentennial Commission. Burke previously served on the Advisory Committee of the Ohio Bicentennial Commission. A commission established by the Ohio General Assembly and Governor George V. Voinovich to supervise the state’s bicentennial celebration in the year 2003 has been established. In order to engage all Ohioans and give a better knowledge and respect of their state’s legacy and the achievements of its residents, the organization has set out to accomplish this goal.

  • His previous jobs have included Environmental Engineering Technician, Strip Mine Foreman, and Heavy Equipment Operator, to name a couple.
  • As the first African American Strip Mine Forman in Ohio, Henry was a trailblazer in the industry.
  • A local historian who is also a published author is available for interview.
  • Burke has written three volumes.
  • When Mr.
  • It has taken many years of research in libraries and interviews with relatives of African American slaves, including his own ancestors, to compile a body of knowledge on the Underground Railroad’s history that teaches, explains, and protects it.
  • Burke weaves the tapestry of “The Freedom Trail,” the greatest human rights tale in American history, from the founding of the Northwest Territory in 1787 through the abolition of slavery in 1865.
  • The author takes his audience on a journey through pain and tremendous delight as he guides them through captivating events that create a new understanding of heroic individuals, both black and white, who sacrificed their lives for the right of all people to live in liberty.
  • Burke on his appointment and are confident that he will do everything in his power to promote history, particularly as it relates to southeastern Ohio.
  • Tags: It has been determined that this page does not have any tags specified.

Other related topics, key words, and phrases include:1787,1865,2003,Civil War,Henry Robert Burke,Ohio,Ohio Bicentennial Commission,Railroad,The Freedom Trail,Underground Railroad, and

Heroes of the Underground Railroad in Alexandria, Wed Oct 24, 2012 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM

Title: Heroes of the Underground Railroad in Alexandria
DateTime: Wed Oct 24, 2012 7:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Location: The Lyceum Museum, 201 S. Washington St.(Map This)
Event Details: The Edmonson Sisters sculpted by Erik BlomeIn “Heroes of the Underground Railroad in Alexandria and D.C. in the 19th Century,” Dr. Jenny Masur, National Capital Region Manager of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom, will conduct an engaging discussion of the Underground Railroad in Alexandria and in Washington, D.C.How many times have you driven past the 10 foot-tall bronze statue of two African American women on Duke Street and wondered what it signified? Join the Alexandria Historical Socety at this lecture and discover the story behind sisters Emily and Mary Edmonson, daughters of a free black man and enslaved woman who attempted to escape to freedom aboard the Pearl in 1848 with nearly 80 other enslaved people.The teenaged girls were captured and transferred to the Bruin Slave Pen on Duke Street, once located where their statue now stands.With help from their father and abolitionists including Harriet Beecher Stowe their freedom was purchased and they were rescued from a life of slavery.Dr. Jenny Masur has worked on the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom program for 13 years.She will also discuss an escape from Alexandria Harbor on a ship called the Regulator and the story of Leonard Grimes, a man who was prosecuted for assisting freedom seekers. Dr. Masur, a 1990 and 2004 Fulbright Professor and expert on the Underground Railroad in the National Capital Region, will introduce the audience to the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom and its definition of the Underground Railroad as “resistance to slavery through flight,” whether by sea or by land.
Contact Phone No.: 703.746.4994
Fees: Free
Audience: Anyone may attend
Tags: King Street,Lecture,Museums,Old Town,Public ArtMemorials,Washington Street

For further information on the event, please see

THE RIVER JORDAN: A True Story of the Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad, the inspiring story of ordinary people who contributed to the abolition of slavery in America by risking their livelihoods, their lives, and the lives of their families in order to assist hundreds of thousands of slaves fleeing to freedom, was not only one of our nation’s finest hours, but it is also a vital example for the rest of the world today, as the United Nations has stated.

  • Most conflicts and terrorist attacks are the consequence of ethnic animosity and racial prejudice, which may be traced back to ancient times.
  • THE RIVER JORDAN is based on the actual story of a mother who fled on the URR in 1843 with her seven children, and is set in the present day.
  • In between the fugitives and Canada, bounty hunters, wild animals, and the wilderness awaited them.
  • Nevertheless, as Jane’s epic account depicts in vivid and horrific detail, it really did happen that way.
  • As a result of this blog, I hope to inform you not only about Jane’s incredible true tale, but also about the history of the Underground Railroad.
  • Henry Burke was a British statesman and politician who lived during the reign of Henry VIII.

Fugitive Slave Laws and the Underground Railroad

Fugitive Slave Laws. The Ordinance of 1787included six definite “Articles of compact between the original States and the people and States in the Northwest Territory, which were to “for ever remain unalterable unless by common consent.” The Sixth of these articles ordains that “there shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said Territory, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.Article VI (also) required fugitive slaves to be returned, giving slave owners unprecedented support not previously available. This was actually the first form of a Federal U.S. Fugitive Slave Law. Each Southern State had its on laws against helping fugitive slaves escape.The United States enacted a Fugitive Slave Law on February 12, 1793. The law however did not contain the word slave. Any Federal district or circuit judge or any state magistrate was authorized to decide finally and without a jury trial the status of an alleged fugitive. TheUnderground Railroadwhich aided fugitive slaves from the Southern States ofthe United States reach freedom in Canada from 1812 through 1861, arose as a resistance against U.S. Fugitive Slave Laws.Excerpted text of the Fugitive Slave Law of 1793SEC. 3. And be it also enacted, That when a person held to labor in any of the United States, or in either of the Territories on the Northwest or South of the river Ohio, under the laws thereof, shall escape into any other part of the said States or Territory, the person to whom such labor or service may be due, his agent or attorney, is hereby empowered to seize or arrest such fugitive from labor, and to take him or her before any Judge of the Circuit or District Courts of the United States, residing or being within the State, or before any magistrate of a county, city, or town corporate, wherein such seizure or arrest shall be made, and upon proof to the satisfaction of such Judge or magistrate, either by oral testimony or affidavit taken before and certified by a magistrate of any such State or Territory, that the person so seized or arrested, doth, under the laws of the State or Territory from which he or she fled, owe service or labor to the person claiming him or her, it shall be the duty of such Judge or magistrate to give a certificate thereof to such claimant, his agent, or attorney, which shall be sufficient warrant for removing the said fugitive from labor to the State or Territory from which he or she fled.SEC. 4. And be it further enacted, That any person who shall knowingly and willingly obstruct or hinder such claimant, his agent, or attorney, in so seizing or arresting such fugitive from labor, or shall rescue such fugitive from such claimant, his agent or attorney, when so arrested pursuant to the authority herein given and declared; or shall harbor or conceal such person after notice that he or she was a fugitive from labor, as aforesaid, shall, for either of the said offences, forfeit and pay the sum of five hundred dollars. Which penalty may be recovered by and for the benefit of such claimant, by action of debt, in any Court proper to try the same, saving moreover to the person claiming such labor or service his right of action for or on account of the said injuries, or either of them.The NewFugitive Slave LaworNewFugitive Slave Actwas passed by the United States Congress on September 18, 1850, as part of the Compromise of 1850 between Southern slave holding interests and Northern Free-Soilers. This was one of the most controversial acts of the 1850 compromise and heightened Northern fears of a ‘slave power conspiracy’. It declared that all runaway slaves be brought back to their masters. Abolitionists nicknamed it the “Bloodhound Law” for the dogs that were used to track down runaway slaves. In 1843, several hundred slaves a year successfully escaped to the North, making slavery an unstable institution in the Border States. The earlier Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 was a Federal law which was written with the intention of enforcing Article 4, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, which required the return of runaway slaves. It sought to force the authorities in Free States to return fugitive slaves to their masters. This motivated “Free Blacks” and Melungeons to wholeheartedly support the Underground Railroad and the Abolitionist Movement. Some Northern States passed “personal liberty laws”, mandating a jury trial before alleged fugitive slaves could be moved. Otherwise, they feared free blacks could be kidnapped into slavery. Other states forbade the use of local jails or the assistance of state officials in the arrest or return of such fugitives. In some cases, juries simply refused to convict individuals who had been indicted under the Federal law. Moreover, locals in some areas actively fought attempts to seize fugitives and return them to the South. And everywhere that was not tied with slavery, abolitionists spoke against this.

In response to the weakening of the original Fugitive Slave Act of 1793, the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 made any Federal marshal or other official who did not arrest an alleged runaway slave liable to a fine of $1,000. Law-enforcement officials everywhere now had a duty to arrest anyone suspected of being a runaway slave on no more evidence than a claimant’s sworn testimony of ownership. The suspected slave could not ask for a jury trial or testify on his or her own behalf. In addition, any person aiding a runaway slave by providing food or shelter was subject to six months’ imprisonment and a $1,000 fine. Officers who captured a fugitive slave were entitled to a bonus or promotion for their work. Slave owners only needed to supply an affidavit to a Federal marshal to capture an escaped slave.Since any suspected slave was not eligible for a trial this led to manyfree blacksbeing conscripted into slavery as they had no rights in court and could not defend themselves against accusations.The Fugitive Slave Act brought defiant responses from some Abolitionists.

Burke Road Realignment Project

Abolition of slavery in America was made possible by the bravery of ordinary people who sacrificed their livelihoods, their lives, and the lives of their families in order to assist thousands of slaves fleeing to freedom. The Underground Railroad was not only one of our nation’s finest hours, but it continues to be a vital example for people around the world. Ethnic hate and racial prejudice are at the root of virtually all conflicts and acts of terrorism today. No other historical example of caring, brave collaboration between peoples of various races can compare to that of the Underground Railroad.

A powerful guy, traveling alone and accountable for no one but himself, would find it difficult to flee from servitude in such a hostile environment.

The achievement was nothing short of amazing for a woman with a big family.

Authors Henry Burke and Dick Croy have collaborated on the book, which is available for purchase on Amazon as an e-book as well as a paperback.

Your questions and comments are always welcome.

We hope you find this article to be interesting, instructive and entertaining. George Washington and Henry Burke are two of the most famous historical figures in the United States. DICK CROY is an American author and musician who is most known for his work on the film “The Godfather.”

  • The Underground Railroad, the inspiring story of ordinary people who contributed to the abolition of slavery in America by risking their livelihoods, their lives, and the lives of their families in order to assist hundreds of thousands of slaves fleeing to freedom, was not only one of our nation’s finest hours, but it is also a vital example for the rest of the world today, as the United Nations has noted. Ethnic hate and racial prejudice are at the root of virtually all conflicts and acts of terrorism. What finer example of loving, brave collaboration between individuals of various races has there ever been than the Underground Railroad? THE RIVER JORDAN is based on the actual story of a mother who fled on the URR in 1843 with her seven children, and is set in the present day. It was hazardous enough for a strong man to leave slavery on his own, with no one else to rely on except himself. In between the fugitives and Canada, bounty hunters, wild animals, and the wilderness waited to trap them. The accomplishment was nothing short of amazing for a woman with a big family. However, as Jane’s epic account depicts in vivid and horrific detail, it definitely did happen. Henry Burke and Dick Croy wrote the book, which is available on Amazon as both an e-book and a paperback. Among the topics covered on this site are Jane’s incredible true narrative, as well as the history of the Underground Railroad. We hope you will find it fascinating, instructive, and entertaining, and we look forward to receiving your questions and comments. Henry Burke was a British statesman and politician who lived during the reign of Henry II. Dick Croy is a fictional character created by author Charles Dickens.

Public Meeting Information

A public hearing was conducted on June 18, and comments were due by July 6, 2018. The Burke Road realignment project, the VRE Rolling Road parking lot extension, and the Burke Road speeding study were all discussed at a public information meeting hosted by Fairfax County Supervisor Pat Herrity and the Fairfax County Department of Transportation. The presentation may be seen online by clicking on the link provided above.

  • Presentation at the Burke Road Corridor Community Meeting will take place on June 18, 2018. a display board for the Burke Road Corridor Community Meeting will be up on June 18, 2018

Comments were required by the end of business on Friday, July 6th. On June 1, 2017, a public meeting was conducted to discuss the Burke Road Realignment Project, which was attended by around 100 people. On the following project designs, local citizens were requested to give their thoughts and comments:

  • Burke Road Realignment Meeting Presentation – June 1, 2017
  • Burke Road Realignment Exhibit
  • Burke Road Realignment Aerial View
  • Burke

All programs and operations of the Florida Department of Transportation are free of discrimination in conformity with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). FCDOT may be reached at 703-877-5600 or TTY 711 if you require this information in an alternative format. Requests for help must be received at least 7 business days before the event for which they are intended.

Project Background

All programs and operations of the Florida Department of Transportation are free of discrimination in conformity with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. (ADA). Contact FCDOT at 703-877-5600 or 711 if you require this information in an other format. It is necessary to submit requests for help at least 7 working days before to an event.

Project Schedule

  • Design completion is expected in the fall of 2020
  • Land acquisition completion is expected in the fall of 2020
  • Utility relocation completion is expected in the spring of 2022
  • Construction begins in the summer of 2022
  • And construction is expected to be completed in the summer of 2023.

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