Where Was The Underground Railroad In Maryland? (TOP 5 Tips)

The Underground Railroad Story | Emmanuel Parish | Cumberland Maryland

  • In those days, this was an area where rail lines came together at the terminus of the C O Canal, which was a major line on the Underground Railroad that ran along the Potomac River, the border between Maryland and Virginia. This section was called “Shanty Town” because it was a poor area where free Black community members lived.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Maryland?

Baltimore was a major station on the Underground Railroad that began in Georgia and the Carolinas and passed through Virginia. The route continued through Central Maryland and into Pennsylvania. Most of these secret trails did not involve traditional 19th century railroads — steam locomotives and passenger cars.

Where was the Underground Railroad located in Maryland?

The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Historical Park (HATU) memorializes this legacy not through physical structures, but by instead through the landscape in Tubman’s native Dorchester County, Maryland which has been preserved by private and public stewards.

Where did Harriet Tubman live in Maryland?

The most famous “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, Harriet Tubman was born and lived in Dorchester County, Maryland, for her first 27 years or so.

What cities did the Underground Railroad go through?

In the decades leading up to the American Civil War, settlements along the Detroit and Niagara Rivers were important terminals of the Underground Railroad. By 1861, some 30,000 freedom seekers resided in what is now Ontario, having escaped slave states like Kentucky and Virginia.

What routes did the Underground Railroad follow through Maryland?

There were many different routes that enslaved people took as they traveled north to freedom. One route out of Maryland was that frequently used by Harriet Tubman. She led her groups, beginning on foot, up the Eastern Shore of Maryland and into Delaware. Several stations were in the vicinity of Wilmington, Delaware.

Which state has the most underground railroads?

Although there were Underground Railroad networks throughout the country, even in the South, Ohio had the most active network of any other state with around 3000 miles of routes used by escaping runaways.

How did Harriet Tubman find out about the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad and Siblings Tubman first encountered the Underground Railroad when she used it to escape slavery herself in 1849. Following a bout of illness and the death of her owner, Tubman decided to escape slavery in Maryland for Philadelphia.

How old would Harriet Tubman be today?

Harriet Tubman’s exact age would be 201 years 10 months 28 days old if alive. Total 73,747 days. Harriet Tubman was a social life and political activist known for her difficult life and plenty of work directed on promoting the ideas of slavery abolishment.

Did Harriet Tubman live in Cape May NJ?

Harriet Tubman lived in Cape May in the early 1850s, working to help fund her missions to guide enslaved people to freedom. From Cape May, in the fall of 1852, she went back once more to Maryland, and brought away nine more fugitives.” The New Jersey Historical Commission says she spent two other summers in Cape May.

Where did the Underground Railroad start?

In the early 1800s, Quaker abolitionist Isaac T. Hopper set up a network in Philadelphia that helped enslaved people on the run. At the same time, Quakers in North Carolina established abolitionist groups that laid the groundwork for routes and shelters for escapees.

Where did Harriet Tubman take the slaves?

Who was Harriet Tubman? Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery in the South to become a leading abolitionist before the American Civil War. She led hundreds of enslaved people to freedom in the North along the route of the Underground Railroad.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

The Ultimate Guide to Underground Railroad Sites in Maryland

The Eastern Shore was the birthplace of numerous Underground Railroad figures, both well-known and lesser-known, including Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and Henry Highland Garnet, all of whom were born there. However, despite the fact that several successful escapes began from the remote Eastern Shore, many of which took advantage of rivers to travel, other freedom seekers were faced with the tragedy of capture and re-enslavement. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, which is the crown gem of the Network to Freedom collection, is located on the shore of Lake Michigan.

Discover the Eastern Shore’s Network to Freedom for yourself.

Central Maryland

Against the backdrop of Baltimore’s bustling city streets and the waterfront docks at Fells Point, a substantial free black population labored and interacted with the slaves. For freedom seekers, this was the ideal location to blend in, conceal themselves, or labor with other African-Americans. Black seamen known as blackjacks operated at Baltimore and Annapolis, where they could conceal freedom seekers in cargo or deliver letters to family members in distant ports. Museums and historic places tell the story of freedom seekers who fled from cities, ports, neighboring fields, and plantations, among other locations.

Southern Maryland

In Southern Maryland, the rolling landscape is famed for its old tobacco plantations, where a huge enslaved population worked to sustain the opulent lifestyle of their masters. Despite this, some people were able to flee persecution. During the Civil War, a few African-Americans who had escaped slavery enlisted in the United States Colored Troops. The Southern Maryland peninsulas are surrounded by water, and having access to the Chesapeake and its rivers provided more chances for escape and recreation.

Visit past plantations and historic locations to learn more about these people and their tales.

Capital and Western Regions

The origins of Joseph Henson’s life may be traced to a region near our nation’s capitol, and his narrative, “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” inspired Harriet Beecher Stowe to create her abolitionist book, “Uncle Tom.” A large number of enslaved persons managed to escape from affluent landowners in the rural districts around the metropolis. Some of them became assimilated into the free black community in Washington, D.C. Others took to the streets on foot. Thrilling escape attempts and, on occasion, captures were the result.

Take a look at the Network to Freedom in the Capital and Western Regions.

Related Links

Maryland: The World’s Most Powerful Underground Railroad Storytelling Destination, according to the National Park Service.

The Freedom Fighters of Maryland Exodus from slavery along the Underground Railroad in Maryland Sites, programs, tours, and research facilities that are part of the Maryland Network to Freedom Maryland’s Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Guide (PDF, Mail Order) is available online.

Welcome

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Historical Sites Along MD’s Active Underground Railroad Are Being Rediscovered

As recorded in the 1860 Census, more than one out of every five persons who resided in Howard County was an enslaved individual. In addition to being transported to the county to work in the tobacco fields, slaves were subsequently used in the mining and manufacture of iron in and around the town of Elkridge, Maryland. Put another way, throughout the century and a half during which slavery was institutionalized and legally enforced in Howard County, a large portion of the county’s economy was constructed on the backs of enslaved African Americans.

Due to its geographic location—between railways and the Potomac and Patuxent rivers—the region served as a way station on the Underground Railroad, which connected slaves in the northern United States and Canada to freedom in the southern United States.

Additionally, it was the site of a stone-built courthouse, which is still standing today, where individuals accused of inciting and supporting enslaved African Americans to leave their masters’ grasp were tried.

Also detained here was Augustus Collins, who was being jailed for encouraging an uprising among the Black populace while awaiting trial.

The most well-known case in this area, arguably, involved well-known Underground Railroad “general” William Chaplin of the American Anti-Slavery Society, who was arrested in August 1850 for having “abducted, stolen, taken, and carried out from the city of Washington” two fugitive slaves, according to court documents.

Doctor Everlene Cunningham, head of the Howard County Center of African American Culture, who was responsible for the county’s Simpsonville Freetown Legacy Trail, argues that these locations and tales are essential to the county’s history.

“These are the kinds of stories you didn’t learn in school when you were younger.” Maryland has the highest number of known successful slave escapes in the country, and counties around the state have been rediscovering—and highlighting—more historical locations in the state, which is considered the heart of the Underground Railroad in the United States.

Larry Hogan, Maryland has also been at the forefront of Underground Railroad research, documentation, and commemoration, which includes the now annual state recognition of September as International Underground Railroad month, which was signed into law by the governor two years ago.

That being said, there’s no reason to wait until the autumn to learn about Maryland’s pivotal part in the Underground Railroad’s history.

Mapping the Underground Railroad across Maryland

Sites along the Underground Railroad were frequently chosen because they were out of sight from the general public. This need now provides a problem in terms of ensuring that the key tales associated with these locations are shared and maintained.

The Fix

Preservation Maryland will collaborate with the Maryland Office of Tourism Development, the Maryland State Archives, and the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture, as well as other academic and community partners, to submit these sites to the National Park Service’s Network to Freedom program for consideration.

Updates

Preservation Through the Bartus Trew Providence Grant program, the National Trust for Historic Preservation awarded Maryland a $20,000 grant, which will be used to bring a team of specialists from the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, a program of the National Park Service, to the Eastern Shore of Maryland to conduct architectural scans of historic African American sites. DETAILS ABOUT THE PROJECT

SEPTEMBER 2020

Preservation Through the Bartus Trew Providence Grant program, the National Trust for Historic Preservation awarded Maryland a $20,000 grant, which will be used to bring a team of specialists from the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, a program of the National Park Service, to the Eastern Shore of Maryland, where they will conduct architectural scans of historic African American structures. DETAILS OF THE PROJECT

AUGUST 2020

Few people’s names have become as associated with tenacity, determination, and liberation as Harriet Tubman’s have done through the years. Almost mythological in her own right, Tubman embodies the finest of the American spirit in the face of terrible hardship and inhumanity. As a Moses for her people, Tubman has achieved legendary status. Yet, for many years, she was deprived of a careful and scholarly history of her life and times. Dr. Kate Clifford Larson, our guest today, addressed that historical inequality and assisted in bringing Harriet’s true story to a new generation of listeners.

LISTEN TO THE RADIO SHOW

Harriet Tubman UGRR

Few people’s names have become as associated with tenacity, determination, and liberation as Harriet Tubman’s have done in recent history. Almost mythological in her own right, Tubman embodies the finest of the American spirit in the face of terrible hardship and inhumanity. As a Moses for her people, Tubman has become almost mythical. She did not have an academic biography, however, which was lacking for a long period of time. Dr. Kate Clifford Larson, our guest today, addressed that historical inequality and assisted in bringing Harriet’s true narrative to a new generation of people.

This week’s PreserveCast takes us back to the brackish marshes of Maryland’s Eastern Shore, where we’ll discuss about Harriet Tubman, slavery, and the struggle for liberty. PODCAST LISTENING OPTIONS

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Junior Rangers

Having a thorough understanding and appreciation of our past is essential for reflecting on ourselves in the present day. Our goal is to educate Junior Rangers about Harriet Tubman’s life and legacy, as well as the significance of the Underground Railroad, via hands-on activities. There are two separate Junior Ranger programs available at Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad State Park: one that focuses on the life and legacy of Harriet Tubman, and another that focuses on the art and music that can be found in the Visitor Center.

  1. Obtain a self-guided activity book from the Visitor Services desk to get started on your Junior Ranger adventure.
  2. Information in the back of the book has not been cleaned or watered down for the sake of our readers.
  3. Despite the fact that our award-winning booklet is primarily meant for children, teens and adults have worked hard to complete it with enthusiasm and dedication.
  4. Once the training is finished, the new Junior Ranger will be sworn in and given a patch to commemorate their achievement.
  5. With the publication of this activity booklet, the emphasis is changing from the park’s physical features to the sights and sounds that impacted the design of the park and its visitor center.
  6. Awakening to the Sights and Sounds of Liberation As part of the Junior Ranger Activity, tourists are encouraged to pay attention to the numerous creative qualities of the Visitor Center while also opening themselves up and feeling the spirit of the park.
  7. The brochure will take guests around the exhibit hall and will challenge them to interpret the exhibit in their own unique way based on the information contained therein.
See also:  Who Were The Main Leaders Of The Underground Railroad In The Early 1840s? (Professionals recommend)

Tubman Experience

The exhibit hall in the visitor center is self-guided; however, rangers are on hand to provide a ranger-led orientation to the park and groups, as well as a Junior Ranger overview and explanation of the exhibits.

Groups can arrange for ranger-led tours or informative programs by contacting the park in advance. Offer applicable only if services are accessible at the time of purchase.

The role of Maryland in the Underground Railroad

A new network of trails and historic places commemorates Maryland’s pivotal role in the Underground Railroad, which guided fugitive enslaved individuals to freedom during the American Revolutionary War. Thank you for your consideration. Pay a visit to Montgomery The next film in 2019 Even while Harriet may have dramatized Harriet Tubman’s renowned struggle to free enslaved folks, it is less well known that Maryland was the heart of action on the Underground Railroad — the loose network of safehouses and passageways north to freedom – during the abolitionist movement.

According to a recent news release from Governor Larry Hogan, “Maryland is home to attractions, historical sites, and programming that commemorate the heroic men, women, and children who went through the Underground Railroad to freedom as well as those who supported them.” The state of Maryland recognizes people who believe in the right to self-determination and independence on a daily basis, not only during International Underground Railroad Month, which is celebrated in September.

On the Tuckahoe, there is a park named Frederick Douglass.

The kick-off event

The official kick-off event for this year will be the introduction of a new visitor experience at Frederick Douglass Park on the Tuckahoe River in Talbot County on September 1. Yes, the famed abolitionist, orator, and novelist, Frederick Douglass, was also a native of the Eastern Shore. He was born in Tappers Corner and later went on to assist enslaved folks in their escape from slavery through the Underground Railroad from his house in New York, where he lived. The town of Tuckahoe was mentioned in Douglass’ autobiography, according to Cassandra Vanhooser, head of Talbot County Economic Development and Tourism.

“Nothing would have occurred if he hadn’t started from the beginning here.” In the previously undeveloped park, four informative panels will provide an outline of Douglass’ life.

According to Vanhooser, “we take you step by step through his journey here and on to the bigger world.” In addition to vistas and walking paths, the park is located along one of four Frederick Douglass byways that connect the Eastern Shore to Annapolis, Baltimore, and Washington D.C.

Future plans call for the park to be expanded even further. Tubman and his companions were forced to run through the region that is now known as the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (formerly known as the Blackwater Wildlife Refuge). The Maryland Department of Tourism

A variety of events and experiences

To kick off the celebrations this year, the presentation of a new tourist experience at Frederick Douglass Park on the Tuckahoe River in Talbot County on September 1 will serve as the opening ceremony. Yes, the famed abolitionist, orator, and novelist, Frederick Douglass, was also a native of Maryland’s Eastern Shore. From his birthplace in Tappers Corner, he went on to assist enslaved persons in their escape from slavery via the Underground Railroad from his home in New York. The town of Tuckahoe was mentioned in Douglass’ autobiography, according to Cassandra Vanhooser, the director of Talbot County Economic Development and Tourism.

“Nothing would have occurred if he hadn’t started from the ground up.” Four informative panels, which will be the first interpretative features to be built in the otherwise undeveloped park, will provide an outline of Douglass’s life and legacy.

Tubman and his fellow fugitives were forced to retreat through the area that is today known as the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge Office of Tourism for the Commonwealth of Maryland

The Underground Railroad beyond Maryland

It is hoped that International Underground Railroad Month would be extended to additional states and possibly countries in the future. Since Maryland launched the initiative last year, proclamations have been issued in North Carolina, Missouri, and Kansas; proclamation requests have been submitted to the governors of New York, Pennsylvania, Iowa, and Kentucky; and special programming is being offered in all of those states, as well as Massachusetts, Florida, and Indiana. For additional information and to begin planning your voyage, go to the Maryland State webpage dedicated to the Underground Railroad.

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International Underground Railroad Month

September is International Underground Railroad Month, which recognizes the significance of the Underground Railroad, and all those who were involved in it, for their contributions to the abolition of slavery in the United States and as a cornerstone for the subsequent more comprehensive civil rights movement. It recognizes the amazing efforts of individuals from all over the world who have dedicated their lives to documenting, interpreting, and disseminating the history of the Underground Railroad to the general public.

Howard County’s Network to Freedom and Underground Railroad sites:

The Simpsonville Freetown Legacy Trail, created by the HCCAAC, commemorates the history of Simpsonville and Harriet Tubman’s role in the Underground Railroad. The trail is open to the public and may be accessed by car or on foot. However, while the Museum and Library are temporarily closed, virtual tours and other material may be accessed by visiting this link. Some of the locations are as follows: Locust Cemetery- According to oral history, Harriet Tubman and escaping slaves took refuge and repose at the gravesites of the Locust family.

  • Middle Patuxent Creek is located at the bottom of the hill, on the south side of Rt.
  • Tubman and other fugitive slaves are reported to have taken refuge on the bank of this creek, near the mouth of the creek.
  • Part of the parcel of land known as “Atol Enlarged,” which later became known as “Freetown,” was located here.
  • Currently, the only things that are remaining of the original plot are Freetown Road, part of Guilford Road dedicated to Harriet Tubman, and the Locust United Methodist Church and Cemetery.

The Howard County Center of African American Culture Museum is located in Howard County, Maryland. Children’s Book Collection 415-1921 5434 Vantage Point Road Columbia, MD 21044 410-715-1921

Howard County Historical Society Museum

At the museum, there are displays highlighting persons who were able to flee from slavery in Howard County. 410-480-3250 Howard County Historical Society Museum 9421 Frederick Road Ellicott City, MD 21042 Howard County Historical Society Museum 9421 Frederick Road Ellicott City, MD 21042

The 1843 Howard County Courthouse

The site of court hearings in situations involving persons accused of inciting slaves to flee their masters’ possession. When famed Underground Railroad agent William L. Chaplin of New York was transferred from Montgomery County to Howard County in 1850, it became the most famous case in the county’s history. These occurrences are described with an interpretative marker. In addition to the Howard County Courthouse 1843 at 8360 Court Avenue in Ellicott City, MD 21043, 410 313-2111 may be reached.

  1. The county of Howard was not an independent entity at the time, but rather a district within the county of Anne Arundel.
  2. According to historical records, the building dates to the 1820s and was owned by the Ellicott family.
  3. When the new courthouse was completed in 1843, this structure was converted back into a domestic home.
  4. This structure was completely destroyed during the flash flood that occurred on Main Street on May 27, 2018.
  5. There are currently no plans to rebuild the structure.
  6. The phone number is 410-313-0421.
  7. These items include: Maryland’s Underground Railroad Network to Freedom: A Visitor’s Guide to the Route to Freedom Map, guidebook, and audio guide for the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Scenic Byway Map of the Frederick Douglass Driving Tour

African American Heritage Sites

The Ellicott City Colored School, located at 8683 Frederick Road in Ellicott City, Maryland, has been restored. 410-313-0421 Construction of this schoolhouse began in 1880 as the first school for African-American pupils, and it was funded entirely by county monies. From the 1880s through 1953, the school was in operation. A museum has been established in the former schoolhouse, which documents African American history in Howard County, notably during the era of segregation and the several segregated schoolhouses that were in the county at the time.

  • Historical Park dedicated to Benjamin Banneker Museum Museum is located at 300 Oella Avenue in Catonsville, Maryland.
  • Banneker is widely regarded as the first African American man of science and is celebrated as such.
  • The programs are centered on Banneker’s life and his relationship with the area where he occupied at the time of his death.
  • Columbia, Maryland is located at 8775 Cloudleap Court, Suite 12.
  • It is one of only three museums of its sort in the United States that is solely dedicated to the art of African civilizations.
  • Among other accolades, it has been named “one of the State’s most regarded cultural institutions” and was named “one of the top ten places to visit in Howard County, Maryland” in 2013.
  • 21043410-313-1945 The B O Ellicott City Station, which was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1968, is the country’s oldest surviving railroad station and played a significant part in the American Civil War.
  • Through displays such as an augmented reality experience, educational events, and living history programs, the site explores the history of transportation and travel in the modern era.
  • Sites on the Civil War Trail As a result of its collaboration with communities since 1994, Civil War Trails® has been able to link tourists with little towns and huge tales throughout a network that now spans six states.

The Trails of the American Civil War transports travelers back in time to the time of the Generals, Soldiers, Citizens, and Enslaved who found themselves caught up in the heart of the Civil War.

  • This historic building, located at 8683 Frederick Road in Ellicott City, Maryland, has been renovated. 410-313-0421 Originally constructed in 1880 as the first school for African American children, this structure was funded entirely by county monies. From the 1880s until 1953, the school was in operation. A museum has been established in the former schoolhouse, which documents African American history in Howard County, notably during the era of segregation and the several segregated schoolhouses that operated in the county during that time. Today, the museum offers tours, seminars, talks, and summer camps, among other things. Historical Park in the Name of Benjamin Banneker. Catonsville, Maryland Museum Museum is located at 300 Oella Ave. 21228410-887-1081 A Banneker State Park is a 142-acre location dedicated to conveying the inspiring narrative of Benjamin Banneker’s life and times. Banneker is widely regarded as the first African American man of science. Exhibitions at the museum trace Banneker’s achievements as a mathematician, astronomer, almanac writer, surveyor, abolitionist, and naturalist during the late 1700s, when he was mostly self-taught. Banneker also served as a naturalist and abolitionist. A large part of the programming revolves around Banneker’s life and his relationship with the country in which he lived and worked. American Museum of Contemporary African Art (MoCAA) is located in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Suite 12 at 8775 Cloudleap Court in Columbia, Maryland 21045410-740-7411 In Columbia, Maryland, the African Art Museum of Maryland (AAMM) is a one-of-a-kind institution that was established in 1980 as the first museum in the planned town. Only three museums in the United States are devoted solely to the art of Africa, and the African Art Museum is one of those three institutions. It is the only one of the three organizations to have been started by an African-American individual. Apart from that, it has been acknowledged as “one of the State’s most revered cultural institutions,” and in 2013 it was named “one of the top 10 places to visit in Howard County, Maryland.” Baltimore Museum of the Ohio Ellicott City Station is located at 3711 Maryland Avenue in Ellicott City, Maryland. 21043410-313-1945 The B O Ellicott City Station, which was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1968, is the country’s oldest surviving railroad station and played a significant part in the American Civil War. It is the oldest existing train station in the country. Through displays such as an augmented reality experience, educational events, and living history programs, the site illustrates the history of transportation and travel in the present day. Network to Freedom Howard County First Courthouse Site marker will be displayed at the location for the time being. Sites along the Civil War Trail As a result of its collaboration with communities since 1994, Civil War Trails® has been able to link tourists with tiny villages and large historical events throughout a network that now spans six states. In order to put oneself in the shoes of the generals, soldiers, civilians, and slaves who found themselves caught up in the heart of this Civil War, travelers turn to Trails.
See also:  How Did The Underground Railroad Impact The Fugitive Slave Law? (Solved)

Credit for the artwork: The Harriet Tubman Mural by Michael Rosato, courtesy of the Maryland Office of Tourism. Nicole Caracia Photography is credited with this image.

Pathways to Freedom

The audio element cannot be played because your browser does not support it. As you read this chapter, pay attention to the audio! What routes did the Underground Railroad take across Maryland, and how did they differ from one another? The paths used by enslaved persons on their journey northward to freedom were numerous and varied. One of the routes out of Maryland that Harriet Tubman usually took was the Route of the Underground Railroad. She guided her groups along the Eastern Shore of Maryland and into Delaware, starting on foot and working their way up.

  • They continued their journey from Delaware to Philadelphia or other locations in southeastern Pennsylvania.
  • Some went to Massachusetts or New York, while others went to California.
  • Escapees boarded boats that traveled up the Chesapeake Bay, where they hoped to find safety.
  • Baltimore was the most populous of these cities.
  • Many of the ship’s pilots were African Americans who assisted fugitives by concealing them and escorting them to safety.
  • It was usual to see African American males aboard ships since so many black people, both free and enslaved, worked as sailors.
  • How were enslaved persons able to travel by rail or ship without being found by authorities?

4 Underground Railroad Sites Newly Designated in Md.

Audio elements cannot be played because your browser lacks support for them. During your reading, pay attention to the passage. The Underground Railroad passed through Maryland on which routes are known. The paths used by enslaved individuals on their journey northward to freedom were numerous and diverse. It is possible that Harriet Tubman took a route out of Maryland on a regular basis. From the Eastern Shore of Maryland to the border of Delaware, she led her parties, starting on foot. Wilmington, Delaware, was served by a number of radio stations.

  1. Thousands of people continued their journey north from there.
  2. Many of them carried on across New York state and into Canada beyond that point.
  3. Sailing from one of the several towns immediately on the Bay or from cities on rivers that flowed into the Bay was an option for them.
  4. When it came to getting to freedom, the Chesapeake Bay served as a major channel of passage.
  5. White captains served as conductors for the Underground Railroad in addition to their other responsibilities.

It was typical to see African American males aboard ships since so many black people, both free and enslaved, worked as sailors. As a result, their presence on ships did not provoke too much alarm. In order to avoid being detected, enslaved persons had to go by rail or ship. return to the home page»

Drive the Maryland Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway

The audio element is not supported by your browser. As you read this text, pay attention to the audio. What paths did the Underground Railroad take through Maryland, and how did it get there? Enslaved persons were able to journey north to freedom via a variety of various routes. One of the routes out of Maryland that Harriet Tubman took on a regular basis was Route 66. She took her groups across the Eastern Shore of Maryland and into Delaware, starting on foot and working their way up the coast.

  • They continued their journey from Delaware to Philadelphia or other cities in southeastern Pennsylvania.
  • The majority of them settled in Massachusetts or New York.
  • Escapees boarded boats that traveled up the Chesapeake Bay to safety.
  • The city of Baltimore was the largest of these.
  • African-American pilots played an important role in hiding fugitives and assisting them on their journey.
  • It was typical to see African American males aboard ships since so many black people, both free and enslaved, worked as sailors.
  • How were enslaved individuals able to travel by rail or ship without being detected?

Minty, Moses, and Harriet

UPDATE: If you’re looking for even more information about Harriet Tubman-related websites, make sure to read our previous blogs. A New York Civil Rights Road Trip and an exploration of history and music in Macon, Georgia are on the itinerary. Araminta Ross was born as a slave in Dorchester County, Maryland, around the year 1822. She would later adopt her mother’s given name as well as her husband’s surname, and she would go by the name of Harriet Tubman later in life. Modern-day history remembers her for her role as the most celebrated conductor of the Underground Railroad, which was a clandestine network of people, routes, and safe houses built to assist slaves from the American South escaping to freedom in the northern hemisphere during the early nineteenth century.

Prior to my visit to Maryland, I would have assumed that everyone in the United States was familiar with Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.

Perhaps the most ironic aspect of our trip was learning that not all Maryland kids were familiar with Harriet Tubman, despite the fact that she was born and lived in their own backyard.

However, that was in the past. Today, Maryland has completely embraced its heritage and welcomes visitors from all over the world to discover the environment that served as the scene for Harriet Tubman’s brave rescues as a conductor on the Underground Railroad throughout the nineteenth century.

Maryland Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway

Kathy Mackel provided the photograph. I’ll be there if it’s a historical event. Any activity that involves driving down one of America’s Byways is acceptable to me. As soon as you put the two together, I’m in paradise. When I had the opportunity to tour significant locations along the Maryland-Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, that’s precisely what occurred. Despite the fact that just a few of Harriet Tubman’s personal belongings, mementos, and photographs from her life have survived the test of time, stories of her daring and persistence in the face of fatal peril have cemented her place as an enduring American legend.

Harriet Tubman was born, lived, and was responsible for the rescue of more than 70 individuals from slavery.

Itinerary for seeing 36 historically significant places associated to the life of Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad, as well as the Underground Railroad itself.

Driving Tour Guide and Map

In order to help you plan your route, you may download free PDF versions of the Driving Tour Guide and Driving Tour Map, or you can obtain free printed copies of each book. A total of 45 places are included in the revised list, including new locations in Pennsylvania and Delaware as well as sites with limited public access.

Audio Guides

TheByway audio guide includes theatrical stories as well as authoritative commentary from historians and people of the local community. In addition to a mobile app for iPhone and Android devices, an online mobile tour, downloadable MP3 files, and a three-CD set are also available.

Key Sites on the Byway

Historians and people of the local community contribute to the Byway audio tour by providing dramatic anecdotes and professional comments. In addition to a mobile app for iPhone and Android, an online mobile tour, downloadable MP3 files, and a 3-CD set, it is also available.

Dorchester County Visitor Center

The Dorchester County Visitor Centeris an excellent place to start your journey along the Byway. Helpful staff members will assist you in designing your driving tour and will give you with guides, maps, and audio choices to make your trip even more enjoyable. Before you begin your journey, make sure you stop by the Maryland Harriet Tubman and Underground Railroad exhibit.

Dorchester County Courthouse

In addition to two legendary Underground Railroad trials that took place in this 1854 edifice, the Dorchester County Courthouse is a historical landmark with a number of compelling stories to tell. An old courthouse on this location, which was destroyed by fire in 1852, served as the site of Harriet Tubman’s first escape, which took place in 1850. Kessiah Bowley, Harriet’s niece, and her two children were up for sale in front of the courtroom when Harriet passed away.

Interestingly, the highest bidder turned out to be none other than Kessiah’s husband John, who happened to be a free man. The official was unable to collect payment because John left with his family. They met up with Harriet in Baltimore, and she guided them all the way to freedom in Philadelphia.

Harriet Tubman Museum

Committed to the preservation of their native daughter, the Harriet Tubman MuseumEducational Center is the community’s oldest organization dedicated to this cause. Exhibits, instructional tools, and literature are all accessible for visitors to assist with, and volunteers are always welcome.

See also:  Why Did Harriet Tubman First Become Involved With The Underground Railroad? (The answer is found)

Maryland Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center

Dedicated to the preservation of their native daughter, the Harriet Tubman MuseumEducational Center is the community’s oldest institution. Voluntary staff are on hand to help visitors with displays, educational tools, and books, among other things.

Bucktown Village Store

Dedicated to the preservation of their native daughter, the Harriet Tubman Museum and Educational Center is the community’s oldest organization. Volunteers are on hand to assist visitors with the exhibits, educational resources, and publications available at the museum.

Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge

Today, the 28,000-acre Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge serves as a haven for migrating birds on their annual migration. However, it was located between Peter’s Neck, where historians think Harriet was born, and theBrodess Farm, where she lived and worked as a kid during the early 1800s. Despite the fact that there is no evidence that Harriet was involved in any rescues in this region, many slave escapes did take place within the confines of the shelter. The Merediths, who operate the Bucktown Village Store, are also the owners of Blackwater Adventures Outfitters, which they founded in 2005.

Vanessa Orr provided the photograph.

Kayaking, I’ve discovered, is the most effective method to get up up and personal with refuge wildlife.

Brodess Farm

Greenbriar Road was the property of Slaver Edward Brodess, who held this parcel of land. Harriet, her mother Rit, and her four siblings were relocated to this location in the mid-1820s. Due to the limited size of his property, he regularly rented out his slaves to other farmers in the surrounding region. The cultivated fields in the landscape close to this roadside stop are very similar to those that existed when Harriet lived and worked in this area in the 1930s.

Linchester Mill

Preston’s Linchester Mill (1840) is the focal point of a reconstructed 19th-century hamlet, which is located in the town of Preston. The water-powered gristmill was in continuous operation until 1979, when the mill pond dam fell as a result of high rainfall during that year. The original machinery is still housed within the ancient mill building. Linchester Mill was an important place for operations on the Underground Railroad during the antebellum years of the nineteenth century. The mill, which was located inside a hidden network of adjacent safe homes, served as a meeting spot for freemen and slaves, Quakers, conductors, and other abolitionists to come into contact with one another, allowing for covert communication.

A nature walk behind the mill leads to a place that is said to have been a crossing point for fugitive slaves crossing Hunting Creek in the 18th century.

James H. Webb Cabin

In 1852, a freeman farmer named James Webb erected this one-room log cottage for his enslaved wife and four children, who were also freemen farmers at the time. The interior of the cabin has a loft, an open fireplace, and a “potato hole,” which may have been used as a hiding spot for escaped slaves during the Civil War. The exterior of the cabin has been sided with milled weatherboard to keep the original wood safe from the elements.

Denton Steamboat Wharf

A replica of the 1883Denton Wharfis located on the Choptank River at the spot where steamboats transported passengers and freight on a monthly basis between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. in the 1850s. This location is notable because slaves came to this location to be auctioned, served as watermen on the docks, and labored in the nearby shipyards. In 1858, Hugh Hazlett, an indicted Underground Railroad conductor, boarded a riverboat at this location on his way to Cambridge, where he would be confronted by an enraged mob and put on trial.

Few people could swim against the powerful currents of the large river, and taking a boat was a dangerous proposition.

Denton Wharf is now home to the Choptank River Heritage Center as well as the Caroline County Office of Tourism, among other things.

Tuckahoe Neck Meeting House

The Nicholites, a local branch of the Society of Friends, erected the Tuckahoe Neck Meeting House in 1803 as a meeting place for their congregation. Quakers, as they are more usually known, were a religious community that participated in an Underground Railroad network that included four other meeting houses in the Caroline County area. Quakers were progressive Christians who believed in the equality of all people, including women. Harriet Tubman would eventually join the suffrage movement, which began in the late nineteenth century with the support of Quaker women.

LodgingDining

On or near the Maryland Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, there are several alternatives for lodging and dining in Dorchester and Caroline Counties, as well as other nearby areas. Here are a handful that I am confident in recommending without hesitation.

Cambridge House B B

The Cambridge House B B, built in 1847, was previously a sea captain’s mansion. Several Byway destinations are within walking distance of the hotel. The Bay Room, one of six themed rooms with historical furnishings and décor, provided a peaceful respite from the outside world. In the presence of my hosts and other visitors, I had a quiche for breakfast, which was one of the alternatives available.

More Dorchester County accommodation alternatives may be found on TripAdvisor by clicking here. More Caroline County accommodation alternatives may be found on TripAdvisor by clicking here.

The High Spot Gastropub

A former sea captain’s mansion, the 1847Cambridge House B B is now a B&B. In addition, various Byway sites are within walking distance of the hotel. This room, one of six themed quarters with historical furnishings and décor, provided a peaceful respite from the world. I had a quiche for breakfast one morning with my hosts and other guests, which was one of several options available. On TripAdvisor, you may find even more Dorchester County accommodation alternatives. On TripAdvisor, you may find even more Caroline County accommodation alternatives.

Market Street Public House

TheMarket Street Public House, located in Denton, is one of the best Irish pubs I’ve ever been outside of Ireland, and it’s one of the best in the country. But, to be honest, I haven’t been to Ireland yet. For lunch, I had the Maryland crab soup and the blackened salmon salad, which were both delicious. It was much more enjoyable to go along the Maryland Eastern Shore in a Mazda CX-3 CUV on the back roads.

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I have visited a number of Irish pubs in the United States, but TheMarket Street Public House in Denton, Texas, is one of the best I’ve encountered outside of Ireland. On the other hand, I haven’t been to Ireland yet! The Maryland crab soup and blackened salmon salad that I had for lunch were both delicious! It was much more enjoyable to go along the Maryland Eastern Shore in a Mazda CX-3 CUV on back roads.

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He is the creator and editor of the travel website Backroad Planet, which he also created. He has been traveling globally since he was a child, and he has resided in countries such as Mexico, Chile, and Paraguay. The exploration of the less-traveled highways of this incredible globe in quest of anything uncommon and distant has become his newfound obsession. While on the stuffy side of things, “Mr. Blount” has worked with companies such as SimonSchuster and McGraw-Hill as a writer, consultant, and published author.

Uncovering the Underground Railroad in Maryland

The “Other Voices of Freedom” exhibit, which opened on February 27 at the Havre de Grace Maritime Museum, pays tribute to Harford County’s participation in the Underground Railroad, a network of pathways used by enslaved individuals in their attempt to escape to freedom in the north. ‘Other Voices of Freedom’ was the name given to the show by Bruce Russell, curator of the exhibit and president of the museum, in an interview with The Click. “Everyone knows about Frederick Douglass, everyone knows about Harriet Tubman,” Russell explained.

  • Because of its strategic location at the confluence of the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay, Havre de Grace was a vital stop on the Underground Railroad.
  • Nonetheless, Harford County’s relationship to the Underground Railroad is not just through the waterway system.
  • The house is renowned as the place where he escaped slavery.
  • Pennsylvania — in which the court ruled in favor of slave catchers who sought to force free Black people into slavery.
  • Research has yet to be completed in several areas of the state, particularly northeastern Maryland, as a result of this.

So far, the database for the project has more than 1,000 entries that are relevant to Harford County. “The Underground Railroad: Other Voices of Freedom” is presently on display as a permanent exhibit at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center.

Underground Railroad Experience Trail

The simulated trail was established as part of the Ashton/Sandy Spring Master Plan in 1998, and it did not exist prior to that year. To offer more pedestrian routes in the neighborhood, maintain the rural scenery, and memorialize a portion of Sandy Spring’s and Montgomery County’s history, Montgomery Parks developed this trail in partnership with the Sandy Spring Historical Society. There is no historical proof that the proprietors of Woodlawn Manor or the structures on the grounds were involved in the Underground Railroad movement.

It is a part of the Rachel Carson Greenway and the National Park Service’s National Underground RailroadNetwork to Freedom(opens in a new tab)program, both of which are located in the same location.

The Ashton/Sandy Spring Master Plan was completed in 1998.

What was the Underground Railroad?

Slavery was allowed in America until the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified in 1865, making it unconstitutional. The name “Underground Railroad” refers to a loose covert network of individuals and places that operated in the nineteenth century and assisted enslaved people seeking freedom in northern free states, Canada, and other locations. The network was never actually subterranean, nor was it a railroad in the traditional sense. There are no train tracks or tunnels to explore at this location.

The path and safe homes chosen by the freedom seeker were determined by his or her unique circumstances, starting point, and final goal.

Despite the fact that it was risky for everyone involved, it is an essential aspect of American and Montgomery County history.

PLAN YOUR VISIT

The park grounds and path are available year-round, from sunrise to dark, and are completely free.

  • Covid-19: All trail users are advised to adhere to safety recommendations, which include the use of face coverings, social separation, hand washing, and refraining from assembling in large groups that exceed existing restrictions. Trail maps are available for purchase on site, or you may download one from this page. Approximately 4.0 miles round-trip, the natural surface route meanders through fields and woodlands
  • Nevertheless, the track is not ADA accessible and is not suited for all strollers. Bicycles are not permitted on the premises. Dogs must be kept on a leash at all times. It is advised that you wear comfortable hiking shoes, dress appropriately for the weather, and use sunscreen and bug repellent. Tick season is here, and there is free parking nearby. During weekends with high visitor traffic, parking may be limited. To make arrangements for a visit to Woodlawn, groups of 35 or more should call or email the Woodlawn Reservations Office at 301-929-5989 (Press 5) or [email protected] at least 5 business days ahead to their visit. Additionally, online educational tools are now accessible to supplement a self-guided visit to the museum.

For more information about guided group hikes and tours, please visit our website. For information on guided public hikes and for WMCP educational resources, please visit our website.

MEDIA PHOTOGRAPHY/FILMING

To photograph or film on the path or park grounds, a permit must be obtained in advance from the National Park Service. [email protected]

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