Where Was The Underground Railroad In Pennsylvania? (Suits you)

One of the many Underground Railroad routes in western Pennsylvania came in through Uniontown in Fayette County, then traveled through Blairsville in Indiana County before continuing into Mercer, Venango and Erie Counties.

civilwar.gratzpa.org

  • One of the many Underground Railroad routes in western Pennsylvania came in through Uniontown in Fayette County, then traveled through Blairsville in Indiana County before continuing into Mercer, Venango and Erie Counties.

Was the underground railroad in Pennsylvania?

As the first free state north of the Mason-Dixon line, Pennsylvania provided numerous entry points to freedom and stops along the Underground Railroad. The Underground Railroad operated from around 1831 until enslaved people were freed after the Civil War.

Where did Harriet Tubman live in Pennsylvania?

Tubman’s efforts during the Civil War 29, 1854, Harriet brought three of her brothers and three other freedom seekers to the home of Allen and Maria Agnew in Kennett Square before escorting them northward. Three years later, she brought her aged parents to safety in St.

Did the Underground Railroad go through Philadelphia?

Two tours of antislavery sites. It’s more than just Harriet Tubman: Philadelphia was an important stop on the Underground Railroad, and in the fight against slavery. And Philadelphia abolitionists, Black and white, were major figures in the movement. You can learn this part of Philadelphia history by walking the city.

Where is the original Underground Railroad located?

They traveled on the famous Underground Railroad from Rockingham County, North Carolina to Canada. This historic site is located in Puce, Ontario, Canada just outside of Windsor, was an actual Terminal of the Underground Railroad.

Where did Harriet Tubman live in Philly?

From the outside, 625 South Delhi Street looks like an average Philadelphia rowhouse. But in the 1850s, it was home to Underground Railroad leaders William and Letitia Still. Within the house’s narrow confines, they hid hundreds of escapees and gave well-known figures like Harriet Tubman shelter.

Was Pittsburgh part of the Underground Railroad?

Though some may not know it, Pittsburgh was highly involved in the Underground Railroad, and hosts a number of sites relevant to the often-treacherous passage that enslaved people embarked upon to escape captivity in the American South and beyond.

Where in Philadelphia was the Underground Railroad?

Located just outside Philadelphia, Bucks County is home to a number of significant sites that were part of the Underground Railroad. Towns like Yardley, Bristol, New Hope and Doylestown feature churches, farms, taverns and more where enslaved people were aided in their journey north.

Did Harriet Tubman ever live in Pennsylvania?

Abolitionist Harriet Tubman, the most famous “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, lived in Philadelphia in the decade before the Civil War.

Why did slaves escape to Pennsylvania?

Pennsylvania, along with most of the other northern states, had passed emancipation laws, while those south of the line remained slave states. Philadelphia’s proximity to this border and its strong abolitionist movement made the area a popular destination for slaves attempting to flee their captivity.

Why was Philadelphia an important stop on the Underground Railroad?

Since Philadelphia was the home of the William Still, who was known as the Father of the Underground Railroad, Philadelphia would play a very important role in the Underground Railroad for escaped slaves seeking their secure and safe passage to freedom.

Are there tours of the Underground Railroad?

Embark on this Unique Experience highlighting Detroit’s Underground Railroad History. The Incredible Journey to Midnight: Detroit Underground Railroad Lantern Walking Tour isn’t your ordinary tour—it’s an experience!

Where was the Pennsylvania Anti Slavery Society located?

The Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society was established in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1838. Founders included James Mott, Lucretia Mott, Robert Purvis, and John C. Bowers.

What states was the Underground Railroad in?

Most of the enslaved people helped by the Underground Railroad escaped border states such as Kentucky, Virginia and Maryland. In the deep South, the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 made capturing escaped enslaved people a lucrative business, and there were fewer hiding places for them.

Were there tunnels in the Underground Railroad?

Contrary to popular belief, the Underground Railroad was not a series of underground tunnels. While some people did have secret rooms in their houses or carriages, the vast majority of the Underground Railroad involved people secretly helping people running away from slavery however they could.

What year did the Underground Railroad take place?

system used by abolitionists between 1800-1865 to help enslaved African Americans escape to free states.

The Underground Railroad

It was far-reaching in scope, covering the whole United States and beyond, and profound in significance for a nation whose very existence was intertwined with the sale of human life. However, because of its secrecy, that history has proven to be a tough one to uncover.

What was the Underground Railroad?

For enslaved persons seeking freedom, Western Pennsylvania served as a key corridor via which they might travel. They traveled largely on foot, with the odd trip in secret compartments of wagons and other modes of conveyance. They followed paths that had been sculpted by nature through rivers, streams, and mountains, and they did it mostly on foot. It is impossible to know how many there were because no formal records were kept and just a few informal ones have survived. Some writings written by people who aided in this subterranean process—sometimes referred to as “conductors”—have survived, providing some indication of the hardships suffered by those going on the railroad.

Affected by the Fugitive Slave Laws were also free individuals of African descent who resided in the region.

Even more were transformed into the voice of social transformation and self-empowerment for all Blacks of the time period and beyond.

From Slavery to Freedom, an exhibition at the Senator John Heinz History Center, will take you on a journey through more than 250 years of African-American history.

One of the several Underground Railroad routes in western Pennsylvania entered through Uniontown in Fayette County, proceeded through Blairsville in Indiana County, and then continued on into Mercer, Venango, and Erie Counties before coming to an end in the city of Pittsburgh.

Western Pennsylvania Underground Railroad Sites

Mt. Washington, PA 15211 Chatham Village Olympia Road Mt. Washington, PA 15211 Building constructed in 1849 that served as a station on the Underground Railroad inside the boundaries of Chatham Village T. James Bigham was an abolitionist barrister and the editor of The Commercial Journal Anti-Slavery Newspaper, which was published in London in 1848. Lucinda Bigham, the Black family nurse of Bigham, is said to have kept a vigilant eye out from the Bigham home’s tower for escaped slaves or professional slave hunters.

More information may be found in this wesa.fm story.

City Baths

Third Street between Market and Ferry Streets in downtown Pittsburgh is home to a barbershop and safehouse that serves the community. Slaves were given a fresh appearance as well as a head start on their escape to the United States. Using lists of famous hotel visitors and advertisements made by persons seeking for escaped slaves, historians have confirmed the hotel’s role in the abolitionist movement.

Daytime: A economic, social, and political club for the city’s white elites; nighttime: a station on the Underground Railroad for slaves fleeing to the United States.

Freedom Road Cemetery

Third Street between Market and Ferry Streets in downtown Pittsburgh is home to a barbershop and safehouse that serves the local community. It was a fresh start for the slaves on their journey to freedom in Canada. Using lists of famous hotel guests and advertisements made by those hunting for escaped slaves, historians have confirmed the hotel’s significance in the history of abolition. Daytime: A economic, social, and political club for the city’s white elites; nighttime: a stop on the Underground Railroad for slaves fleeing the slave trade.

Gibson House (Mark Twain Manor)

The Jamestown Future Foundation is located at 210 Liberty St. in Jamestown, Pennsylvania 16134 and can be reached at 724.932.5455. Dr. William Gibson, a well-known Jamestown physician, accompanied Samuel Clemens on his journey to Russia. Clemens authored a book on their adventures, titled Innocents Abroad, which is available on Amazon. It has been speculated that the home served as a halt on the Underground Railroad. There is evidence of a tiny chamber that was utilized as a station on the Underground Railroad in the basement.

The Gibson House is a historic structure that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

John C. Peck Oyster House

Fourth Street between Wood and Market Streets in downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania A station halt on the Underground Railroad.

Plaque Honoring Jane Gray Swisshelm

600 Grant St., in the heart of downtown Pittsburgh In downtown Pittsburgh, on Sixth Avenue, at the Heinz headquarters is the Heinz Museum. Jane Grey Swisshelm had direct experience with slavery and became committed to the abolitionist fight for the Underground Railroad as a result. She started publishing an abolitionist weekly in Pittsburgh in 1848, called the Pittsburgh Saturday Visitor.

Private homes in Arthurville and Hayti

600 Grant Street is located in the heart of downtown Pittsburgh. In downtown Pittsburgh, on Sixth Avenue, at the Heinz headquarters is the Heinz Center. Following her first-hand experience with slavery, Jane Grey Swisshelm was inspired to join the abolitionist effort for the Underground Railroad. She started publishing an abolitionist weekly in 1848 called the Pittsburgh Saturday Visitor.

St. Matthew’s A.M.E. Church in Sewickley

600 Grant Street, in the heart of downtown Pittsburgh Located on Sixth Avenue in downtown Pittsburgh, at the Heinz headquarters. Jane Grey Swisshelm was personally affected by slavery and became committed to the abolitionist effort and the Underground Railroad. She began publishing her abolitionist weekly, the Pittsburgh Saturday Visitor, as early as 1848.

Wylie A.M.E. Church

Hill District, 2200 Wylie Avenue, 2200 Wylie Avenue On July 11, 1850, a group of African American residents gathered at the church and passed resolutions criticizing the recently proposed Fugitive Slave Bill, which had been sponsored by the United States Congress. A request was made at this assembly for the complete amalgamation of their organizations in order to secure protection against slave hunters who come into Pittsburgh in search of fugitives.

Demolished Sites

Avery Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church, at the corner of Nash and Avery Streets, was afterwards known as Avery College and then as Avery Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church. In 1812, Charles Avery moved to Pittsburgh from New York. His interest in the cotton industry led him on purchasing excursions to the southern United States, where he became interested in the situation of the Negro slaves. He became a member of the abolitionist movement and assisted slaves in their escape from the South to Canada via the underground railroad.

  • Avery’s riches enabled him to build the Allegheny Institute and Mission Church, which became known as Avery College.
  • The basement, which was only accessible by concealed trap doors, was most likely a “station” (hiding spot) on the Underground Railroad’s secret underground network.
  • During the night, a rowboat was employed to transport them up the canal to the tunnel entrance in secrecy.
  • When Avery passed away, his net worth was estimated to be $800,000.
  • Workmen dismantled the red brick structure of Avery College in Old Allegheny’s Dutchtown to make room for the East Street Valley Expressway, which has been a source of contention for years.

With the exception of a few nostalgic old-timers, hardly one seemed to notice the demolition of the ancient building. Old-timers, on the other hand, believed that demolition of the structure signaled the end of a notable Pittsburgher’s dream.

Crawford Grill

Avery Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church, located at the corner of Nash and Avery streets, was later known as Avery College and then as Avery Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church. In 1812, Charles Avery arrived in Pittsburgh. Due to his interest in the cotton industry, he went on several buying excursions to the South, where he became more concerned about the situation of slaves, particularly black slaves. Abolitionist groups recruited him, and he assisted slaves fleeing from the Southern states to Canada via the underground railroad.

  • Avery’s money enabled him to build the Allegheny Institute and Mission Church, which became known as Avery College.
  • Trap doors in the basement provided access to what was most likely a “station” (hiding spot) on the Underground Railroad’s secret network.
  • During the night, they were transported up the canal in a rowboat, which was hidden from view.
  • His estate was valued at $800,000 at the time of his death.
  • Avery College, located in Dutchtown in Old Allegheny, was razed to make room for the East Street Valley Expressway, which has been a source of contention for decades.
  • Old-timers, on the other hand, believed that demolition of the structure signaled the end of a renowned Pittsburgher’s ambition.

Monongahela House

Avery Memorial A.M.E. Zion Church, located at the corner of Nash and Avery Streets, was later known as Avery College. In 1812, Charles A. Avery arrived in Pittsburgh. His interest in the cotton industry led him on purchasing excursions to the southern United States, where he became interested in the condition of Negro slaves. He became a member of the abolitionist movement and assisted slaves in their escape from the South to Canada through the underground railroad. The Allegheny Institute and Mission Church, subsequently known as Avery College, was a three-story facility erected with finances from Mr.

  • The basement, which was only accessible by concealed trap doors, was most likely a “station” (hiding spot) on the Underground Railroad’s underground Underground Railroad.
  • A rowboat was employed to transport them up the canal in the middle of the night to the tunnel opening.
  • When Avery passed away, his estate was believed to be worth $800,000.
  • Workmen dismantled the red brick Avery College building in Old Allegheny’s Dutchtown to make room for the East Street Valley Expressway, which has been a source of contention for years.

With the exception of a few of emotional old-timers, hardly one seemed to notice the demolition of the ancient edifice. However, to the old-timers, the demise of the edifice signaled the end of a notable Pittsburgher’s lifelong ambition.

Point View Hotel

On Brownsville Road in Brentwood, there is a family-owned historic pub and restaurant that was originally used as a stopping point on the Underground Railroad. Slaves who had escaped were housed in the basement.

See also:  Who Was The Most Famous Activist Of The Underground Railroad? (Professionals recommend)

Celebrate Harriet Tubman Day by Exploring Philly’s Underground Railroad Sites

The inscription on the Liberty Bell, a notoriously shattered symbol of the abolitionist cause, says, “Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the people thereof,” according to the Bible. In this exhibition, you can see how the bell became a worldwide symbol of freedom through exhibits and movies. As in February 2021, the Liberty Bell will be open everyday, with capacity restrictions in place to provide a safe tourist experience. More information can be found at Visit Philadelphia used this photograph by M.

Kennedy.

In 1796, one of them, Ona Judge, was able to escape bondage with the assistance of the Philadelphia community of free Blacks.

More information can be found at Visit Philadelphia used this photograph by P.

  • Meyer.
  • Mother Bethel African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church is located on the oldest plot of property continuously held by African Americans and serves as its “mother” church.
  • Harriet Tubman, Lucretia Mott, Frederick Douglass, and William Still all addressed the congregation from the pulpit of Mother Bethel.
  • Tours of the museum are only available by appointment.
  • During a self-guided tour of the site’s Underground Railroad Museum, visitors can explore historical items and hear tales about the site’s history, including the story of Cornelia Wells, a free African American woman who resided there during the Civil War.

Meyer for the City of Philadelphia African Americans in Philadelphia 1776-1876, a permanent exhibit at the country’s first institution sponsored and established by a major municipality to preserve, interpret, and show the legacy of African Americans, is on display at the Audacious Freedom: African Americans in Philadelphia Museum of Art.

In addition, the museum features rotating art exhibitions that explore the contemporary Black experience.

More information can be found at After becoming the first licensed African American Methodist preachers in 1784, Reverends Richard Allen and Absalom Jones staged a walk-out when the authorities of St.

George’s Methodist Church refused to allow Black members to sit in the church’s sanctuary.

More information can be found at This Quakerburial site, established in 1703, is the ultimate resting place of abolitionists such as Lucretia Mott, Robert Purvis, and others.

It also serves as a center for environmental education.

More information can be found at Photo courtesy of R.

Kennedy for Visit Philadelphia of the Johnson House This house in Germantown, built in 1768, belonged to pious Quakers Samuel and Jennett Johnson, who, in the early 1800s, took in fugitive slaves from the South.

It is said that William Still and Harriet Tubman paid a visit to the residence, according to family history.

More information can be found at Volunteers at theKennett Underground Railroad Centergive tours of important places in this charming hamlet, which is located about an hour southwest of Philadelphia’s downtown core.

  1. While a timetable for guided bus tours is still being finalized for 2021, interested visitors can contact out through email to get a PDF for a self-guided tour in exchange for a $20 gift to the museum.
  2. Johnson The community of Bristol in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, is home to a monument dedicated to Underground Railroad conductor Harriet Tubman, which stands along the Delaware River shoreline.
  3. More information may be found here.
  4. Enslaved persons were assisted in their trek north by churches, farms, pubs and other establishments in towns such as Yardley, Bristol, New Hope, and Doylestown, among others.
  5. The trip will include a stop to Collingdale’s Historic Eden Cemetery, which is the final resting place for some of the most famous people on the Underground Railroad, including William Still, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, James Forten, and many more.
  6. It includes a stop at Arlington Cemetery, formerly known as Riverview and Fernland Farms, both of which are located on National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom land and are managed by the National Park Service (National Park Service National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom).
  7. click here to find out more

A Journey to Freedom, the Underground Railroad in PA

The inscription on the Liberty Bell, a notoriously shattered symbol of the abolitionist cause, says, “Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the people thereof,” according to the biblical text. Through exhibits and movies, visitors may follow the bell’s development into an international symbol of liberty. In order to provide a safe visiting experience, the Liberty Bell will be open everyday beginning in February 2021. More information can be found at Visit Philadelphia published this photograph by M.

Kennedy.

The assistance of Philadelphia’s free Black community enabled one of them, Ona Judge, to escape bondage in 1796.

More information can be found at Visit Philadelphia provided this photograph by P.

  1. Meyer.
  2. Church, founded by Bishop Richard Allen, is located on the oldest parcel of land continuously owned by African Americans and serves as the “mother” church of the nation’s first Black denomination.
  3. As a haven for fugitive Africans, Allen and his wife, Sarah, opened their home.
  4. Tours to the museum must be scheduled in advance.
  5. During a self-guided tour of the site’s Underground Railroad Museum, visitors may see historical items and hear tales about the site’s history, including the story of Cornelia Wells, a free African American woman who resided there during the Civil War.
  6. Meyer for the City of Philadelphia.
  7. This documentary includes a narrated chronology and film portraits of trailblazers and campaigners such as Bishop Richard Allen, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Octavius Catto, and many more.
  8. Although it will not reopen until a later date, the African American Museum in Philadelphia will continue to provide virtual access to its collection and exhibits until February 2021.
  9. George’s Methodist Church refused to allow Black members to sit in the congregation’s sanctuary.

More information can be found at The ultimate resting place of abolitionists such as Lucy Mott, Robert Purvis, and others is this Quaker burial plot, established in 1703 by the Society of Friends (Quakers).

It also serves as a center for environmental education and training.

More information can be found at Photo courtesy of R.

Kennedy for Visit Philadelphia of The Johnson House At the time of the Johnsons’ construction in 1768, this Germantown residence belonged to devoted Quakers Samuel and Jennett Johnson, who took in runaway slaves in the early 1800s.

According to family legend, William Still and Harriet Tubman both paid a visit to the residence.

More information can be found at Volunteers at theKennett Underground Railroad Centergive tours of important landmarks in this charming hamlet, which is located about an hour southwest of Philadelphia’s downtown core.

  1. However, although the timetable for guided bus tours for 2021 is still being finalized, interested tourists can contact out through email to receive a PDF for a self-guided tour in exchange for a $20 payment.
  2. Johnson— Continue reading.
  3. Towards the North Star, Tubman is depicted on the statue, pointing his finger.
  4. Bucks County, which is located just outside of Philadelphia, is home to a variety of historically significant locations that were formerly part of the Underground Railroad.

More information can be found at Among the locations on this self-guided tour of Chester and Delaware counties are not only residences and meeting places, but also cemeteries and historical organizations.

The trip will include a stop to Collingdale’s Historic Eden Cemetery, which is the final resting place for some of the most famous people on the Underground Railroad, including William Still, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, James Forten, and other notable figures.

It includes a visit at Arlington Cemetery, previously known as Riverview and Fernland Farms, both of which are located on National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom land and are managed by the National Park Service (National Park Service National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Tour).

see this page for further information

1. Indiana County Underground Railroad Driving Tour

Indiana County is located in the U.S. state of Indiana. The self-guided Indiana County Underground Railroad Driving Tour will take you on a journey down the path to liberation. During the three-hour tour, you will pass by notable landmarks such as the former AME Zion Church (which was the first African church organized in the county), the McCune Store (whose “safe room” in the store’s basement was used to harbor escaping slaves), and Mr. and Mrs. David Myers’ House (which was the home of the Myers family) (the couple were considered friends of slaves because they rescued and fed them on multiple occasions).

2. Blairsville Underground Railroad History Center

Indiana County is a county located in the state of Indiana in the United States of America. The Indiana County Underground Railroad Driving Tour is a self-guided driving tour that allows you to discover the path of liberation. As you travel through the county on the three-hour tour, you will pass by notable sites such as the former AME Zion Church (the first African church to be organized in the county), the McCune Store (the “safe room” in the basement of this store was used to harbor escaping slaves), Mr.

David Myers’ House, and many others (the couple were considered friends of slaves because they rescued and fed them on multiple occasions).

3. Kennett Square Underground Railroad Center

Kennett Square is a neighborhood in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania. With a visit to theKennett Square Underground Railroad Center in adjacent Philadelphia, visitors will learn about important aspects of our nation’s past. The Center’s mission is to educate the public about abolitionists in the local area through exhibitions, bus tours, lectures, and on-going research. Consider the path traveled by fugitives, who were aided by stationmasters who harbored slaves, to reach the stations and sites that make up this historic stopover point.

4. LeMoyne House

Washington Isn’t it true that LeMoyne House is Pennsylvania’s first National Historic Landmark associated with the Underground Railroad? Running away slaves were welcomed at the home of Dr. Francis Julius LeMoyne, who made his home and other assets available to them on their journey to freedom. The LeMoyne House provided as a safe haven for those fleeing the Nazi occupation before continuing their journey northward to the Canadian border.

5. Stoltzfus BedBreakfast

Lancaster Stoltzfus BedBreakfast, located in the heart of Amish Country, is a renovated Victorian estate that was originally utilized as a safe home for members of the Underground Railroad. Built in 1845 by Captain William Fassitt, this bed and breakfast was first intended to entertain visitors and host expensive parties. However, exhausted escape slaves would often stop here to recover before continuing their journey to freedom.

6. Christiana Underground Railroad Center

Lancaster Stoltzfus Bed and Breakfast, located in the heart of Amish Country, is a renovated Victorian estate that was formerly utilized as a safe home for members of the Underground Railroad.

It was built in 1845 by Captain William Fassitt to entertain visitors and give expensive parties, but it was also a popular resting place for exhausted fugitive slaves who needed a break before continuing their journey to freedom.

7. Pheasant Field Bed and Breakfast

Carlisle The “John Miller property,” which is now the Pheasant Field Bed and Breakfast, was originally part of a land grant obtained from the heirs of William Penn by Matthew Miller Sr. circa 1730 and is now part of the Pheasant Field Bed and Breakfast. It is important to note that the floor of a closet in the summer kitchen was cut to allow freedom seekers to hide until it was safe enough for them to go on to the next safe house in the neighborhood. This area of the property was renovated in the 1970s and bits of plates and dining utensils were discovered, possibly from the food that had been provided to the runaways at the time.

8. Dobbin House Tavern

Carlisle The “John Miller property,” which is now the Pheasant Field Bed and Breakfast, was originally part of a land grant obtained from the heirs of William Penn by Matthew Miller Sr. around 1730 and is now part of the Pheasant Field Bed and Breakfast. Note that the floor of one of the summer kitchen’s closets was cut to provide a hiding place for freedom seekers until it was safe enough for them to go on to the next safe haven. This area of the property was renovated in the 1970s and bits of plates and dining utensils were discovered, which may have come from the food that was provided to the fugitives.

See also:  What Audience Does Underground Railroad Colson Whitehead Appeal To? (Suits you)

On The Way To Freedom: 7 Stops Along Pennsylvania’s Underground Railroad

We take pleasure in a sense of liberation. We have complete freedom to come and go as we like and travel by any methods we choose. What if you had to leave the only home you’ve ever known in order to go to a foreign country, fearing for your safety on every leg of the journey? This is exactly what enslaved people did when they were able to flee the southern states and travel north. It was one step closer to freedom with every station stop on the subterranean railroad that ran throughout the state of Pennsylvania.

  1. As a result of my conversation with the innkeeper, I discovered that New Hope was a frequent stop on the underground railroad.
  2. I was astonished by what I discovered.
  3. Once enslaved persons crossed the boundaries into Pennsylvania from Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia (now West Virginia), there were a large number of abolitionists who were eager to assist them.
  4. As the first free state north of the Mason-Dixon line, Pennsylvania served as a hub for the Underground Railroad, providing multiple points of entry and resting places for those seeking freedom.
  5. Every safety stop along the journey was referred to as a station or depot by the crew.
  6. The “conductors,” persons who aided enslaved people seeking freedom, put their own lives at danger as part of the covert efforts to free themselves.
  7. The Underground Railroad was in operation from roughly 1831 until enslaved people were emancipated during the Civil War, when it was decommissioned.
  8. They primarily went on foot, with the odd journey in carts, boats, or railroad carriages with concealed compartments for convenience.

The most of them aspired to travel to Canada, where they would be able to live their lives as they pleased. Let’s take a look at some of the important stations along the Underground Railroad’s route across Pennsylvania’s countryside.

1. Philadelphia

Philadelphia, being the epicenter of the Quaker abolitionist movement and the city where Harriet Tubman was released, played a crucial part in the Underground Railroad’s success or failure. The following are some of the most important places associated with the Underground Railroad that you will not want to miss when you are in the area. According to how many sites you see and other activities you participate in, you might make Philadelphia your home base for a few days or even a couple of weeks.

  1. He was also rumored to have purchased enslaved persons with the intention of releasing them.
  2. After that, have a look at the Johnson House Historic Siteattic to see the hidden hiding places, including a trap door.
  3. The Kennett Underground Railroad Center will assist you in visualizing the journey traveled by those seeking freedom.
  4. Here’s a guide (in PDF format) to all of the connected historical markers, libraries, monuments, and archives in the surrounding area.

2. New Hope And Bucks County

Bucks County, Pennsylvania, is home to churches, farms, taverns, and other places that were formerly part of the Underground Railroad. These locations are located just outside of Philadelphia. Underground Railroad locations may be found in towns including Bristol, Doylestown, Yardley, and New Hope, and they are all available to the public for tours. When visiting this area, you have the option of staying in Philadelphia or in one of the beautiful communities around. When we visited New Hope, we slept at the Wedgwood Inn Bed & Breakfast, which was built in 1870.

  • At one end of the property’s side-yard, there’s a gazebo with a hatch door going down into the tunnel system, which was utilized to access to the canal and continue over the Delaware River on their trek north.
  • It is included on our list of lovely eastern Pennsylvania communities that you must see while in the area.
  • It functioned as a safe haven for members of the Underground Railroad.
  • It is estimated that he assisted over 9,000 individuals in their escape from slavery.
  • It was discovered in their cellar that an entry to the tunnel system existed.
  • The section of the film that discusses the basement chamber begins at 4:38 into the video.
  • While you’re there, treat yourself to a delicious lunch or dinner.
  • Harriet lived in the region and was a conductor for the Underground Railroad, dedicated her life to the abolition of slavery.
  • During the years leading up to the Civil War, she risked her life on multiple occasions to aid approximately 70 freedom seekers on their journey north.

Additionally, there are several other locations in the Bucks County region, and you may use these driving instructions for places in the Upper and Central Bucks County areas. To go around Lower Bucks County, use these driving directions. Photograph courtesy of George Sheldon/Shutterstock

3. Christiana

Churches, farms, pubs, and other places in Bucks County, just outside of Philadelphia, have been identified as having been part of the Underground Railroad. Underground Railroad locations may be found in towns like as Bristol, Doylestown, Yardley, and New Hope, and they are available to the public for tours. Visit this area and either stay in Philadelphia or in one of the beautiful communities that are nearby. As part of our journey to New Hope, we slept at the 1870 Wedgwood Inn Bed & Breakfast.

  1. An open pavilion in the side yard has a hatch door going down to the tunnel system that they utilized to get to the canal and continue over the Delaware River on their way north.
  2. On our list of must-see little towns in eastern Pennsylvania, it is one of the highlights.
  3. In this capacity, it acted as a safe point for members of the Underground Railroad.
  4. The aid that he provided is said to have saved around 9,000 people from slavery.
  5. In their cellar, they discovered an entry to the tunnel system.
  6. Approximately 4:38 into the film is where the section regarding the basement chamber begins.
  7. Enjoy a delicious lunch or dinner while you’re there.
  8. This was her home, and she was one of the Underground Railroad’s conductors, devoted her life to the abolition of slavery.
  9. She risked her life multiple times prior to the Civil War in order to aid approximately 70 freedom seekers on their journey north of the Mississippi River.
  10. To get about Lower Bucks County, use the driving directions provided below.

4. Gettysburg

There is plenty of Civil War history to be found at Gettysburg, and one landmark you won’t want to miss is the Dobbin House Tavern, which served as an Underground Railroad safe house. In its current state, it provides beautiful meals in the restaurant and pub, with the opportunity to stay overnight in the bed and breakfast. This unique monument allows visitors to witness the hiding places of freedom seekers, and one of the rooms has a view of the spot where President Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address.

Gettysburg is a fantastic destination for a day trip or, better yet, for a couple of days exploring all of the Civil War sites in the surrounding region. Robin O’Neal Smith is an American actress and singer.

5. Allegheny Portage Railroad

Dobbin House Tavern, a historic Underground Railroad safe house, is a must-see in Gettysburg, and it’s one of the most important sites in Civil War history. In its current state, it provides fine dinners in its restaurant and bar, with the option of staying overnight in the bed and breakfast. It is possible to see where freedom seekers took refuge, and one of the apartments has a view of where President Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address. A day trip to Gettysburg is highly recommended, but spending a couple of days seeing the many Civil War sites in the surrounding region is much better!

6. Blairsville And Indiana County

The Blairsville Underground Railroad History Center acts as an educational resource for the public to learn about the Underground Railroad. The Underground Railroad Museum, which is housed in the Second Baptist Church building, offers tours of several places associated with the Underground Railroad. From there, you may embark on a three-hour self-guided tour of Indiana County, which will take you down freedom’s journey. Several notable sights, such as the McCune Store, which had a “safe chamber” in the store’s basement that was used to protect people seeking freedom until they could move again, are included on the Indiana County Underground Railroad Driving Tour.

Ruhrfisch courtesy of Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

7. Pittsburgh

The Blairsville Underground Railroad History Center acts as an educational resource for the public to learn about the history of the Underground Railroad. Tours of several places associated with the Underground Railroad are available in the Second Baptist Church building, which houses the museum. Starting at this location, you may embark on a three-hour self-guided tour through Indiana County to learn about freedom’s journey. Several notable sights, such as the McCune Store, which had a “safe chamber” in the store’s basement that was used to protect people seeking freedom until they could move again, are included on the Indiana County Underground Railroad Driving Tour.

Wikimedia Commons photo courtesy of Ruhrfisch (CC BY-SA 3.0)

  • Tips for Making the Most of Your Weekend in Bucks County, Pennsylvania
  • A Road Trip Through Alabama’s Civil Rights History: From Anniston to Selma
  • Everything You Need to Know About the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C

Tour the Underground Railroad in Bucks County

A new life was symbolized by the Underground Railroad for thousands of escaped slaves in the 18th and 19th centuries, and it continues to do so today. Runaways depended on abolitionists and generous towns to assist them on their trek northward through this covert network of hidden, secure sites. From bars and churches to privately held farms, Bucks County was home to a slew of notable train stations, many of which are still open to the public today.

Follow the steps on this list to follow the path that many people travelled in their quest for freedom. To get to the stations in Upper and Central Bucks County, use these driving directions: Upper Bucks County Take a driving trip across Lower Bucks County with these driving directions.

1870 Wedgwood Inn

In the cellar of this Victorian bed and breakfast’s original construction, munitions were kept safe throughout the American Revolutionary War. However, during the time of the Underground Railroad, it was utilized to conceal persons as they made their way northwards across the United States. People used to utilize the subterranean tunnel system to travel to the canal and then on to Lumberville, which is accessible through a hatch in the Gazebo on the property’s grounds. As an overnight visitor, you may be fortunate enough to catch a glimpse of the event.

African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church

The African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME Church) is the oldest African American church in Bensalem and a former Underground Railroad safe post, having been built over 200 years ago. Hundreds of slaves were rowed up the Delaware River by Robert Purvis, an abolitionist and one of the founders of the American Anti-Slavery Society, from Philadelphia to the church and their farm in Bensalem, Pennsylvania. It is estimated that he assisted around 9,000 fugitives in fleeing, making him one of the most influential men in Bucks County who was linked with abolitionism at the time.

Leroy Allen, an escaped slave from Roanoke, Virginia, sought refuge here before joining the Union Army to fight for his freedom in the war against slavery.

The Archambault House

It is the oldest African American church in Bensalem and a former Underground Railroad safe post, having been in existence for over 200 years. To seek safety at the church and their property in Bensalem, abolitionist Robert Purvis, who was one of the founding members of the American Anti-Slavery Society, rowed slaves up the Delaware River from Philadelphia. The number of fugitives he helped escape is thought to have been about 9,000, making him one of the most significant figures in Bucks County who was engaged with abolitionism.

During the American Civil War, Leroy Allen, an escaped slave from Roanoke, Virginia, sought refuge here before joining the Union Army to fight for his freedom.

Bristol

The African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME Church) in Bensalem, Pennsylvania, is the oldest African American church in the city and a former Underground Railroad safe post with a nearly 200-year history. Hundreds of slaves were rowed up the Delaware River by Robert Purvis, an abolitionist and one of the founding members of the American Anti-Slavery Society, from Philadelphia to the church and their farm in Bensalem, Pennsylvania. The number of fugitives he helped escape is thought to have been about 9,000, making him one of the most influential men in Bucks County who was linked with abolitionism.

Leroy Allen, an escaped slave from Roanoke, Virginia, sought refuge here before joining the Union Army to fight for his freedom. He eventually resided in Bensalem and is buried there.

Buckingham Friends Meeting House

In 1776, members of the Buckingham Meeting House (also known as the Solebury Friends Meeting House) voted to abolish the practice of slave ownership. Following the kidnapping of Benjamin “Big Ben” Jones, a local slave and well-known personality, abolitionists presented a series of anti-slavery lectures in this area and in Lambertville, Pennsylvania. Today, the meetinghouse serves as a venue for community gatherings.

See also:  What Was The Underground Railroad Like? (Perfect answer)

Continental Tavern

When the Buckingham Meeting House (also known as the Solebury Friends Meeting House) was founded in 1776, members voted to abolish the practice of slave ownership. The kidnapping of Benjamin “Big Ben” Jones, a revered figure in the community, prompted a series of anti-slavery lectures in both this city and Lambertville by anti-slavery activists. The meetinghouse now serves as a venue for community gatherings.

Doylestown

Samuel Aaron lived at 105 East State Street for a period of time in the early 1830s, when he served as pastor of the New Britain Baptist Church. He was also a manager for the American Anti-Slavery Society, and it is believed that he was responsible for the concealment of fleeing slaves at his residence in the Borough of Manhattan. (Please keep in mind that this is a private property, so please keep your distance.)

Harriet Tubman Memorial Statue

While strolling down the shoreline, be sure to stop at the Harriet Tubman Memorial Statue, which is one of the most important Underground Railroad landmarks in Bucks County. Tubman devoted her life to the cause of liberation and is considered to be one of the most well-known conductors on the Underground Railroad, according to historians. Before the Civil War, she put her life in danger a number of times in order to assist approximately 70 slaves northward.

Langhorne

As a stop on the Underground Railroad during the Civil War, Langhorne (then known as the village of Attleboro) served as a link between Princeton, New Jersey, and New York City. Bucks County’s first free black settlements were established in Attleboro, and the American Methodist Episcopal church, founded in 1809, is the oldest congregation of its kind to have been established in the county. There are African-American Union Army veterans buried in several of Bucks County’s different cemeteries, including the Langhorne Cemetery.

Mount Gilead Church

The Underground Railroad passed through Bucks County, and the first all-African-American church to operate in the county was a significant stop on the journey. It grew from 70 to 162 members between 1830 and 1840, according to church records. These fugitive slaves from Maryland, Delaware, and the Carolinas took advantage of the protection provided by Buckingham Mountain to start new lives and live independently. When their most famous churchgoer, Benjamin “Big Ben” Jones, was apprehended after being sold out by a white resident in the area, it became one of the major rallying cries for the congregation, giving them even more motivation to continue their church and ensure that it was stronger than it had ever been.

Today, visitors and residents alike can attend a regular church service at the location in question.

However, there are those who believe that Big Ben is buried here, while others believe that he is assumed to have been buried by his wife Sarah in a potters field somewhere near the Bucks County Almshouse.

Newtown Theatre

In the early 1850s, the Newtown Theatre, which is the world’s oldest continuously functioning movie theater, was known as Newtown Hall. It is currently known as the Newtown Theatre. It was a favorite gathering place for town meetings and anti-slavery demonstrations. Several notable abolitionists, including Lucretia Mott and Frederick Douglass, are recorded as having spoken at this event.

New Hope

Early in the nineteenth century, the Newtown Theatre, which is the world’s oldest continuously functioning movie theater, was known as Newtown Hall. A popular meeting place for community gatherings and anti-slavery demonstrations, it was located here. Here are some of the most famous abolitionists of the time, including Lucretia Mott and Frederick Douglass.

Quakertown

The Newtown Theatre, which is the oldest continuously functioning movie theater in the United States, was originally known as Newtown Hall when it first opened its doors in the early 1850s. It was a favorite meeting place for community assemblies and anti-slavery demonstrations during the Civil War. Famous abolitionists such as Lucretia Mott and Frederick Douglass are known to have spoken at this event.

Richard Moore House

The distance between stops, which might be up to 10 miles, led to Richard Moore’s stone home being one of the most significant sites on the Underground Railroad for slaves going through Bucks County during the abolitionist movement. Moore, a potter from the area, became well-known for his friendliness, and many people were sent to his house. Henry Franklin, a former slave, was the driver of the wagon that delivered pottery, coal, and the secret slaves hidden beneath the goods for Moore. Robert L.

Moore’s generosity is now available for purchase.

Yardley

Several locations in Yardley, including a white-columned mansion on South Main Street, a shop on Afton Avenue, a house on South Canal Street, the Old Library, the borough Baptist and American Methodist Episcopal churches, and a stone house on River Road, were likely hiding places for fugitive slaves. For those who are interested in the genuine narrative of fugitive slave Big Ben seeking freedom from Maryland in Bucks County, we recommend seeing the film The North Star, which was shot in Bucks County and depicts the true story of runaway slave Big Ben seeking freedom from Maryland.

Visit the African American Museum of Bucks County’s events calendar for more information!

Explore Bucks County’s TownsMain Streets

With a long and illustrious abolitionist history as well as a sizable and active free black community, Philadelphia and the surrounding region played an important part in the infamous Underground Railroad network. It was a loosely linked group of white and black persons that assisted enslaved people on their journeys to freedom in the northern United States and Canadian territories. As documented by Robert Smedley in 1883, slaveholders began to refer to the “Underground Railroad” as early as the 1780s to describe covert activities in the Columbia, Pennsylvania region to aid fugitives from slavery.

  • The city of Columbia came out of the little hamlet of Wright’s Ferry, which was formed by Quakers and other white people who were opposed to slavery and wanted to establish a free society.
  • The Plymouth Friends Meetinghouse, which was built in 1708 in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, functioned as a station on the Underground Railroad in conjunction with Abolition Hall, which was located on the other side of Germantown Pike on the opposite side of the street.
  • In south central and southern Pennsylvania, as well as in southwestern New Jersey, runaway routes evolved, aided by strong Quaker abolitionist networks and flourishing free black communities, which assisted fugitives in their journeys farther north.
  • The fugitives on the southeastern Pennsylvania route had a common planned goal of Phoenixville, where they hoped to find the residence ofElijah Pennypacker(1804-1888), who would assist them on their way to Philadelphia, Norristown, Quakertown, Reading, and other stations along the way.

As early as 1804, this network of help was given the term “Underground Railroad,” and historian Larry Gara estimates that by the mid to late 1840s, as many as one thousand enslaved persons a year were joining the sluggish but constant movement on the Underground Railroad.

Tense Borders

The “riot” in Christiana took place at the home of William Parker, a free black man who had assisted in the formation of a mutual defense group for the black people of the region. Upon arriving to Parker’s house, Edward Gorsuch and his men were greeted by a group of at least fifty men who had come to defend the fugitive slaves from capture. History of Pennsylvania (Historical Society of Pennsylvania). Interstate relations were heated as a result of this activity between border South states such as Maryland and border North states such as Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

  1. Armed resistance was mounted against slaveholders’ attempts to recapture slaves, with abolitionists in many cases liberating the accused from courtrooms and jailhouses as a result.
  2. However, although the rescuers in New Jersey were successful in freeing a black family from a professional slave catcher from Philadelphia, their counterparts in Carlisle were less successful, and the scenario ultimately resulted in the conviction of eleven rescues.
  3. In spite of the increasing violence along the North/South border, escapes were still common during the 1850s.
  4. The Vigilance Committee, led by notable black abolitionists like Robert Purvis(1810-98) in its early years and subsequently by William Still, provided further help to new immigrants in Philadelphia (1821-1902).
  5. William Still (1821-1902), a New Jersey native, was a prominent member of the Vigilance Committee during the Civil War.
  6. His wife, Letitia (George) Still (1821-1906), played a vital role in the operation by lending the Still family a place to stay and by utilizing her sewing abilities to create the garments and earn money to assist with the project’s funding.
  7. Also at the Anti-Slavery Society office at 105 N.
  8. 1816-97), who had been brought there from the South, and Still’s own brother Peter (1801-68).
  9. According to his notebook, which is now housed at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, he assisted 485 fugitives in Philadelphia between 1852 and 1857, according to the journal.

Still’s labor and records demonstrate unequivocally the significance of the free black community to the functioning and success of the Underground Railroad, and they are well worth studying.

Philadelphia’s Aid Network

During the Christiana “riot,” a free black man named William Parker, who had helped create a mutual defense group for the area’s black population, was shot and killed in his home. Upon arriving to Parker’s house, Edward Gorsuch and his men were greeted by a group of at least fifty men who had come to protect the fugitive slaves. (Source: Pennsylvania Historical Society) Consequently, tensions arose between border South states such as Maryland and border North states such as Pennsylvania and New Jersey as a result of this activity.

  • Armed resistance was mounted against slaveholders’ attempts to recapture slaves, with abolitionists in many cases liberating accused slaves from courtrooms and jailhouses as a result.
  • However, although the rescuers in New Jersey were successful in freeing a black family from a professional slave catcher from Philadelphia, their counterparts in Carlisle were less successful, and the case ultimately resulted in the conviction of eleven rescuers from the town.
  • This is perhaps the most well-known of these rescue “riots.” However, despite escalating tensions along the North/South border, evasions persisted into the 1850s.
  • With the Vigilance Committee, led by famous black abolitionists like as Robert Purvis(1810-98) in its early years and subsequently by William Still, new newcomers to Philadelphia received further support (1821-1902).
  • They also helped them disguise themselves as they traveled from one train station to another.
  • Wikimedia Commons has a collection of images.
  • In addition to lending the Still family a place to stay and utilizing her sewing abilities to create the garments, Letitia (George) Still (1821-1906) played a significant role in raising funds to assist with the surgery.
  • As a bonus, Still received a number of now-famous fugitives at the Anti-Slavery Society’s headquarters at 105 N.
  • 1816-97), who had himself been brought there from the South, and Still’s own brother, Peter (1801-68).
  • It is estimated that between 1852 and 1857, he assisted 485 fugitives in the city, according to his logbook, which is now housed at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

It is obvious from Still’s work and records that free black communities were critical to the functioning and success of the Underground Railroad, and that this was especially true during the Civil War.

Underground Railroad Group Tours

A tour of the Cumberland Valley that is only available to tour groups includes stops at places associated with the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom. Guests will enjoy traveling in the footsteps of history via gorgeous countryside, secret hiding spots, historical buildings, an interactive trial, and the National Civil War Museum, among other attractions.

Full Day

Then it’s on to freedom! Leaving from your starting point, travel along the picturesque Route 174 to your first “stop.” Don’t be fooled by the innocent beauty of the rolling fields; it is the perfect setting for unexpected guests to appear out of nowhere. Lunch on the Run: Stop off at the 1832 Boiling Springs Tavern for a late lunch before continuing your journey. This pub, which is prominently placed in the centre of the hamlet, has the distinction of being the country’s longest continuously operating tavern.

This lovely town will be the subject of a walking tour that will feature Underground Railroad landmarks such as the iron forge and clock tower, before coming to an abrupt conclusion at the home of abolitionist Daniel Kaufman.

After that, you’ll have an interactive trial in one of the best-preserved instances of a county courthouse anywhere in the United States.

Finally, take a stroll around and into the United States Army HeritageEducation Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.

A parachute simulation, a bunker where you may sit and view a movie from the perspective of the soldiers waiting within, and a soldier’s gear display are among the highlights.

Make it a Weekend

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *