Which Best Describes The Underground Railroad? (Suits you)

The Underground Railroad—the resistance to enslavement through escape and flight, through the end of the Civil War—refers to the efforts of enslaved African Americans to gain their freedom by escaping bondage. Wherever slavery existed, there were efforts to escape.

What is the underground railroad known for?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. The free individuals who helped runaway slaves travel toward freedom were called conductors, and the fugitive slaves were referred to as cargo.

What was the Underground Railroad quizlet?

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early-to-mid 19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.

What is the Underground Railroad and what was its impact?

A well-organized network of people, who worked together in secret, ran the Underground Railroad. The work of the Underground Railroad resulted in freedom for many men, women, and children. It also helped undermine the institution of slavery, which was finally ended in the United States during the Civil War.

What is the definition of underground railroad in geography?

The Underground Railroad was a network of people working to take enslaved people from the southern United States to freedom in the northern U.S. and Canada. The “railroad” used many routes from states in the South, which supported slavery, to “free” states in the North and Canada.

How did the Underground Railroad work quizlet?

How did the Underground Railroad work? Escaped slaves were lead by conductors. They stopped during the day and traveled at night. They worried freed slaves would take their jobs and they needed cotton that the slaves picked for factories.

What was the Underground Railroad quizlet Chapter 11?

– The Underground Railroad was a system of trails and people used by slaves to escape to freedom before the Civil War. – Harriet Tubman used this trail to rescue slaves.

What was the Underground Railroad Weegy Brainly?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. … The free individuals who helped runaway slaves travel toward freedom were called conductors, and the fugitive slaves were referred to as cargo.

What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad apex?

What was the Underground Railroad? It was not an actual railroad. It was a network of houses and buildings that were used to help slaves escape from the South to freedom in the Northern states or Canada.

Why is the Underground Railroad important to history?

The underground railroad, where it existed, offered local service to runaway slaves, assisting them from one point to another. The primary importance of the underground railroad was that it gave ample evidence of African American capabilities and gave expression to African American philosophy.

Was the Underground Railroad an actual railroad?

Nope! Despite its name, the Underground Railroad wasn’t a railroad in the way Amtrak or commuter rail is. It wasn’t even a real railroad. The Underground Railroad of history was simply a loose network of safe houses and top secret routes to states where slavery was banned.

How did the Underground Railroad lead to the Civil War quizlet?

How did the Underground Railroad cause the Civil War? *The Underground Railroad was a escape route for fugitive slaves in America. *Slaves would be helped by Northerners or “Quakers” who help slaves escape to Canada. *The Underground Railroad made the South mad because this was beneficial to slaves.

Why is it called the Underground Railroad?

(Actual underground railroads did not exist until 1863.) According to John Rankin, “It was so called because they who took passage on it disappeared from public view as really as if they had gone into the ground. After the fugitive slaves entered a depot on that road no trace of them could be found.

Where does the Underground Railroad start?

The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center opened in August 2004 on the banks of the Ohio River in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio.

What were the tracks of the Underground Railroad?

There were four main routes that the enslaved could follow: North along the Mississippi and Ohio rivers to the northern United States and Canada; South to Florida and refuge with the Seminole Indians and to the Bahamas; West along the Gulf of Mexico and into Mexico; and East along the seaboard into Canada.

Eastern Illinois University : Teaching with Primary Sources

However, many of the intriguing and lesser known elements of the Underground Railroad are not included in many textbooks, despite the fact that it is an essential part of our nation’s history. It is intended that this booklet will serve as a window into the past by presenting a number of original documents pertaining to the Underground Railroad. Broadsides, prize posters, newspaper clippings, historical records, sheet music, pictures, and memoirs connected to the Underground Railroad are among the primary sources included in this collection.

The Underground Railroad was a covert structure established to assist fugitive slaves on their journey to freedom in the United States.

As a result, secret codes were developed to aid in the protection of themselves and their purpose.

Runaway slaves were referred to as cargo, and the free persons who assisted them on their journey to freedom were referred to as conductors.

These stations would be identified by a lantern that was lighted and hung outside.

A Dangerous Path to Freedom

Traveling through the Underground Railroad to seek their freedom was a lengthy and risky trek for escaped slaves. Runaway slaves were forced to travel long distances, sometimes on foot, in a short amount of time in order to escape. They accomplished this while surviving on little or no food and with little protection from the slave hunters who were rushing after them in the night. Slave owners were not the only ones who sought for and apprehended fleeing slaves. For the purpose of encouraging people to aid in the capture of these slaves, their owners would post reward posters offering monetary compensation for assisting in the capture of their property.

  1. Numerous arrested fugitive slaves were beaten, branded, imprisoned, sold back into slavery, or sometimes killed once they were apprehended.
  2. They would have to fend off creatures that wanted to kill and devour them while trekking for lengthy periods of time in the wilderness, as well as cross dangerous terrain and endure extreme temperatures.
  3. The Fleeing Slave Law of 1850 permitted and promoted the arrest of fugitive slaves since they were regarded as stolen property rather than mistreated human beings under the law at the time.
  4. They would not be able to achieve safety and freedom until they crossed the border into Canada.
  5. Aside from that, there were Underground Railroad routes that ran south, on their way to Mexico and the Caribbean.
  6. He was kidnapped from his northern abode, arrested, and prosecuted in Boston, Massachusetts, under the provisions of this legislation.
  7. After the trial, Burns was returned to the harshness of the southern states, from which he had thought he had fled.

American Memory and America’s Library are two names for the Library of Congress’ American Memory and America’s Library collections.

He did not escape via the Underground Railroad, but rather on a regular railroad.

Since he was a fugitive slave who did not have any “free papers,” he had to borrow a seaman’s protection certificate, which indicated that a seaman was a citizen of the United States, in order to prove that he was free.

Unfortunately, not all fugitive slaves were successful in their quest for freedom.

Harriet Tubman, Henry Bibb, Anthony Burns, Addison White, Josiah Henson, and John Parker were just a few of the people who managed to escape slavery using the Underground Railroad system.

He shipped himself from Richmond, Virginia, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a box that measured three feet long, two and a half feet deep, and two feet in diameter. When he was finally let out of the crate, he burst out singing.

ConductorsAbolitionists

Fugitive slaves who wanted to escape to freedom had a long and risky trip ahead of them on the Underground Railroad. It was necessary for runaway slaves to travel great distances in a short period of time, sometimes on foot. They did this while surviving on little or no food and with little protection from the slave hunters who were following after them in the streets. The pursuit of fleeing slaves was not limited to slave owners. For the purpose of enticing people to aid in the capture of these slaves, their owners would post reward posters promising cash to anybody who assisted in the capture of their property.

  • Numerous apprehended fugitive slaves were beaten, branded, imprisoned, sold back into slavery, or sometimes killed once they were captured.
  • In order to live lengthy amounts of time in the wilderness, people would have to battle off creatures that wanted to kill and devour them, navigate dangerous terrain, and contend with extreme temperatures.
  • The Fleeing Slave Law of 1850 permitted and promoted the apprehension of fugitive slaves since they were viewed as stolen property rather than mistreated human beings under the terms of the legislation.
  • Only after crossing into Canadian territory would they find safety and liberty.
  • Aside from that, there were Underground Railroad routes that ran south from the United States to Mexico and the Caribbean.
  • The man was apprehended at his northern residence, arrested, and prosecuted in Boston, Massachusetts, under the provisions of this law.
  • Then, following the trial, Burns was returned to the harshness of the South, from which he had believed himself to have fled.
See also:  What Were The Levels Of People Who Owned Slaves In The Underground Railroad? (Best solution)

Both the American Memory and America’s Library divisions of the Libray of Congress are located in Washington, DC.

Frederick Douglass was yet another fugitive slave who managed to flee from his master’s grasp.

He pretended to be a sailor, but it was not enough to fool the authorities into believing he was one.

Fortunately, the train conductor did not pay careful attention to Douglass’ documents, and he was able to board the train and travel to his final destination of liberty.

Although some were successful in escaping slavery, many of those who did were inspired to share their experiences with those who were still enslaved and to assist other slaves who were not yet free.

Another escaping slave, Henry “Box” Brown, managed to get away in a different fashion.

He shipped himself from Richmond, Virginia, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a box that measured three feet long, two and a half feet deep, and two feet wide, and weighed two pounds. His singing was heard as soon as he was freed from the box.

Efforts of Abolitionists Telling Their Story:Fugitive Slave Narratives

Henry Bibb was born into slavery in Kentucky in the year 1815, and he was the son of a slave owner. After several failed efforts to emancipate himself from slavery, he maintained the strength and persistence to continue his struggle for freedom despite being captured and imprisoned numerous times. His determination paid off when he was able to successfully escape to the northern states and then on to Canada with the assistance of the Underground Railroad, which had been highly anticipated. The following is an excerpt from his tale, in which he detailed one of his numerous escapes and the difficulties he faced as a result of his efforts.

  1. I began making preparations for the potentially lethal experiment of breading the shackles that tied me as a slave as soon as the clock struck twelve.
  2. On the twenty-fifth of December, 1837, the long-awaited day had finally arrived when I would put into effect my previous determination, which was to flee for Liberty or accept death as a slave, as I had previously stated.
  3. It took every ounce of moral strength I have to keep my emotions under control as I said goodbye to my small family.
  4. Despite the fact that every incentive was extended to me in order to flee if I want to be free, and the call of liberty was booming in my own spirit, ‘Be free, oh, man!
  5. I was up against a slew of hurdles that had gathered around my mind, attempting to bind my wounded soul, which was still imprisoned in the dark prison of mental degeneration.
  6. Furthermore, the danger of being killed or arrested and deported to the far South, where I would be forced to spend the rest of my days in hopeless bondage on a cotton or sugar plantation, all conspired to discourage me.
  7. The moment has come for me to follow through on my commitment.
  8. This marked the beginning of the construction of what was known as the underground rail route to Canada.

For nearly forty-eight hours, I pushed myself to complete my journey without food or rest, battling against external difficulties that no one who has never experienced them can comprehend: “not knowing when I might be captured while traveling among strangers, through cold and fear, braving the north winds while wearing only a thin layer of clothing, pelted by snow storms through the dark hours of the night, and not a single house in which I could enter to protect me from the storm.” This is merely one of several accounts penned by runaway slaves who were on the run from their masters.

Sojourner Truth was another former slave who became well-known for her work to bring slavery to an end.

Green and many others, including Josiah Henson, authored autobiographies in which they described their own personal experiences.

Perhaps a large number of escaped slaves opted to write down their experiences in order to assist people better comprehend their struggles and tribulations; or perhaps they did so in order to help folks learn from the mistakes of the past in order to create a better future for themselves.

The Secret History of the Underground Railroad

He was born into slavery in Kentucky in the year 1815, and he was the son of a slave owner named Henry Bibb. After several failed efforts to emancipate himself from slavery, he maintained the strength and persistence to continue his struggle for freedom despite being captured and imprisoned multiple times. It was only through his determination that he was able to successfully escape to the northern states and then to Canada with the help of the Underground Railroad, a feat that had been highly anticipated.

  • For my own personal liberty, I made a decision somewhere during the autumn or winter of 1837 that I would try to flee to Canada if at all feasible.” Immediately after, I began preparing for the potentially lethal experiment of breading the chains that kept me a prisoner in my own home.
  • I also purchased a suit that I had never worn or been seen in before, in order to escape discovery.
  • It was the twenty-fifth of December, 1837.
  • My moral bravery was tested to the limit when I left my small family and tried to keep my emotions under wraps at all times.
  • No matter how many opportunities were presented to me to flee if I wanted to be free, and the call of liberty was booming in my own spirit, ‘Be free!
  • A thousand barriers had formed around my mind, attempting to bind my wounded spirit, which was still imprisoned in the dark dungeon of mental degradation.
  • It was difficult to break free from my deep bonds to friends and relatives, as well as the love of home and birthplace that is so natural among the human family, which were entwined around my heart and made it difficult to go forward.
  • But I’d calculated the cost and was completely prepared to make the sacrifice before I started the process.

If I don’t want to be a slave, I’ll have to abandon friends and neighbors, along with my wife and child.” I was given something to eat by these gracious folks, who then set me on my way to Canada on the advise of a buddy who had met me along the road.” This marked the beginning of the construction of what was referred to be the underground rail track from the United States to the Canadian continent.

In the morning, I walked with bold courage, trusting in the arm of Omnipotence; by night, I was guided by the unchangeable North Star, and inspired by the elevated thought that I was fleeing from a land of slavery and oppression, waving goodbye to handcuffs, whips, thumb-screws, and chains, and that I was on my way to freedom.

See also:  Who Were Pilots In The Underground Railroad? (Question)

I continued my journey vigorously for nearly forty-eight hours without food or rest, battling against external difficulties that no one who has never experienced them can comprehend: not knowing when I might be captured while traveling among strangers, through cold and fear, braving the north winds while wearing only a thin layer of clothing, being pelted by snow storms through the dark hours of the night, and not being able to find a house in which to take shelter from the storm.” Among the countless accounts recorded by escaped slaves is this one, which is only one example.

Sojourner Truth, a former slave who became well-known for her efforts to bring slavery to an end, was another person who came from a slave background.

Green and many others, including Josiah Henson, authored autobiographies in which they described their own personal journeys.

The writing down of one’s experiences by so many escaped slaves may have been done in order to assist people better comprehend their struggles and tribulations; or it may have been done in order to help individuals learn from their mistakes in the aim of building a brighter future.

What is the Underground Railroad? – Underground Railroad (U.S. National Park Service)

Harvey Lindsley captured a shot of Harriet Tubman. THE CONGRESSIONAL LIBRARY

I was the conductor of the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say what most conductors can’t say—I neverran my train off the track and I never lost a passenger.

When we talk about the Underground Railroad, we’re talking about the attempts of enslaved African Americans to obtain their freedom by escaping bondage. The Underground Railroad was a method of resisting slavery by escape and flight from 1850 until the end of the Civil War. Escape attempts were made in every location where slavery was practiced. In the beginning, to maroon villages in distant or rough terrain on the outside of inhabited regions, and later, across state and international borders.

  1. The majority of freedom seekers began their journey unaided and the majority of them completed their self-emancipation without assistance.
  2. It’s possible that the choice to aid a freedom seeking was taken on the spur of the moment.
  3. People of various ethnicities, social classes, and genders took part in this massive act of civil disobedience, despite the fact that what they were doing was unlawful.
  4. A map of the United States depicting the many paths that freedom seekers might follow in order to attain freedom.
  5. All thirteen original colonies, as well as Spanish California, Louisiana and Florida; Central and South America; and all of the Caribbean islands were slave states until the Haitian Revolution (1791-1804) and British abolition of slavery brought an end to the practice in 1804.
  6. The Underground Railroad had its beginnings at the site of enslavement in the United States.
  7. The proximity to ports, free territories, and international borders caused a large number of escape attempts.
  8. Freedom seekers used their inventiveness to devise disguises, forgeries, and other techniques, drawing on their courage and brains in the process.
  9. The assistance came from a varied range of groups, including enslaved and free blacks, American Indians, and people from a variety of religious and cultural backgrounds.
  10. Because of their links to the whaling business, the Pacific West Coast and potentially Alaska became popular tourist destinations.

During the American Civil War, many freedom seekers sought refuge and liberty by fleeing to the Union army’s lines of communication.

Making a TV show about slavery is enough to undo you. Ask Barry Jenkins

Barry Jenkins clearly recalls the moment he learned about the Underground Railroad for the very first time. The first time he heard such words, he was probably 5 or 6, and he recalls how it was “unimaginable” to him: “IsawBlack people riding trains that were underground.” He worked as a longshoreman and would always arrive at the port with his hard hat and tool belt on his back. Someone like him, I believed, was responsible for the construction of the Underground Railroad. “It was a great sensation since it was only about Black people and the concept of constructing things.” It would later become clear to the child that the name “Underground Railroad” was actually a slang word for a network of safe homes and passageways that slaves used to flee their tyrannical owners in the antebellum South.

This year’s highly anticipated “The Underground Railroad,” an Amazon limited series based on Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novel about a runway slave named Cora (Thuso Mbedu) and her desperate, often hellish quest for freedom as she flees the shackles of bondage, will bring Jenkins’ childhood vision of the railroad full circle.

  • The author serves as an executive producer on the adaptation, which will debut on the streaming service on Friday, April 12.
  • He was nominated for an Academy Award for best director for his work on the 2016 homosexual coming-of-age film, which went on to win the award for best picture.
  • However, while Jenkins is clearly pleased with his accomplishment, he is also aware that “The Underground Railroad” represents the greatest risk of his professional life.
  • Specifically, the filmmaker predicts that Black viewers, in particular, would have a more intense emotional response to the distressing content than other audiences.
  • “That’s not what it’s about,” he remarked in an interview done through video conference from his home, during which he was both animated and softly reflective.
  • For the past 41 and a half years, this has been my life’s work.
  • I’m not sure how to digest what I’ve just heard.

This is not the case in this instance.

‘That duty, that weight, it’s still on my shoulders.’ (Image courtesy of Atsushi Nishijima/Amazon Prime Video) Jenkins considers the project to be his destiny on the one hand.

Then I realized that I had to do it.” In addition, he was able to witness the practical manifestation of his early idea with the construction of an underground set at the Georgia State Railroad Museum in Savannah, Georgia.

“It needs to be authentic.

In order for the players to walk into the tunnel and touch the rails, they must be able to get down on their knees and touch the walls.

It would have been a mind-boggling experience.

The series is the latest in a long line of notable ventures that have combined America’s horrendous history of racial relations with elements of popular culture to great effect.

Black viewers have condemned the films “Them” and “Two Distant Strangers” in particular, labeling the painful imagery as “Black trauma porn” (trauma for black people).

There is a good chance that the premiere episode of “The Underground Railroad” will add additional gasoline to the fire.

Jenkins claims that black viewers had already expressed their opinions many weeks before the broadcast.

“Do we require any further photographs of this?” the query posed.

(Image courtesy of Kyle Kaplan/Amazon Studios) From the beginning, he was warned that he was about to walk into a minefield.

“However, I do not believe that the country will ever be prepared to look at photos from this period.” Despite this, all you’ve heard for the past four years has been the slogan ‘Make America Great Again.’ At least some of what America has done, particularly when it comes to individuals who look like me, has to be a result of wilful ignorance or erasure on their side.

To discover Jenkins’ genuine goal, audiences are encouraged to look past the scenes of brutality and recognize his underlying motivation: to shine a light on the victory of slaves rather than on their traumatic experiences.

“It’s the only reason someone like me is here today, and nothing else.” “If I am able to take these photographs and put them back into their original context, it makes the portrayal of the images worthwhile.” He mentioned the prominent role played by children in Whitehead’s work, and he stated that he intended to replicate that presence in the series.

  1. However, there is a great deal that has to do with parenting as well.
  2. As a result, youngsters are constantly present in our presentation.
  3. The NAACP and the journal were founded by W.E.B.
  4. “I came to the realization that this was one of the most amazing acts of collective parenting the world has ever witnessed.” They were there to safeguard the youngsters.
  5. We hear that Black families have always been divided and that Black dads have always been gone from their children’s lives, and this is true.
  6. (Image courtesy of Amazon Studios’ Atsushi Nishijima) Kim Whyte, a mental health counselor located in Georgia, was brought on board to help him create a safe and open setting for dealing with the challenging and often visceral subject matter.
See also:  When Was The First Slavery Act In The Underground Railroad? (Solved)

According to Jenkins, Whyte’s involvement was not intentional: “I didn’t want these pictures to unravel us, even while we were unpacking them.” Whyte expressed gratitude to Jenkins for the confidence he placed in her, saying, “I couldn’t find a model before me in terms of being a mental health counselor on a set.” I was able to engage with everyone on the set because to Barry’s generosity.

  1. His permission to connect with them after takes and in between takes was very appreciated.” ‘It was eye-opening,’ she described her experience.
  2. However, they all had lives of their own.
  3. The material, on the other hand, was causing people to respond.
  4. “It’s a stain on humanity that we all share,” Whyte explained.
  5. ‘This character does not sit well with me.’ It was necessary for them to unravel the emotions that they were required to express at times.
  6. As we went through it, I told her, ‘Yes, you have every right to be unhappy about this,’ she said.
  7. ‘And you are a human being.’ They needed to realize that it wasn’t their own rage.

The Underground Railroad: a heartbreakingly beautiful and brutal portrayal of the journey to ‘freedom’

It is a railway platform and you are afraid of missing the train that will take you from servitude to time. I feel like there is so much you haven’t spoken yet. and so little time to say it all.” As the enslaved Cora (Thuso Mbedo) attempts to communicate her truths about the horrible and painful memories of slavery in Barry Jenkins’ breathtakingly raw and harsh adaptation of Colson Whitehead’s novel, The Underground Railroad, a man voice over the sound system talks over the speakers. Cora and Caesar (Aaron Pierce) are on the run from the Randall Plantation in Georgia, which is owned by Terence Randall, who is known for his callous violence against his enslaved laborers from the very beginning of the series.

  • It is revealed in the first episode that a returning runaway has been set on fire and publicly burnt to death.
  • For more than two decades, I have been researching and lecturing about slavery in the United States.
  • The Underground Railroad brings these testimonials to life on screen in vivid and visceral detail, bringing them to life on screen.
  • It’s possible that violence has a valid point in this context.
  • It is also somewhat tempered.

No Place to call Freedom

Jenkins accomplishes a superb job of capturing the aesthetic differences between slavery and so-called freedom in his photographs. In the first episode, we witness a group of local slaveholders congregating on Randall’s front yard. A group of slaves smile as a young kid is forced to stumble through a recall of Thomas Jefferson’s “Declaration of Independence,” the foundational text of the American Revolution, which is read aloud by the group. Of course, they are completely unaware of the irony.

  1. The sceneries alter as you progress farther into quasi-liberty.
  2. Cora is dressed in the most stunning yellow ballgown, having left behind her drab job clothes in the morning.
  3. However, as the camera pans farther up the freedom road, to North Carolina, Cora is back in her rags, terrified and desperate.
  4. The road leading into town is lined with trees bearing ” odd fruit ” with black and white bodies.
  5. White villagers were hanged for harboring fugitives from slavery who were not from their own race.
  6. However, when Cora travels farther north, she discovers that racism has just altered its shape, just as it has done historically.
  7. According to Cora’s reflections in a later episode, it appears that there are no safe havens.
  8. Despite the fact that this adaption is set in the present day, the awful secrets of Griffin in South Carolina and the white supremacist town of North Carolina are a part of a far longer history of racial oppression in the United States.

Jenkins has created a visually disturbing representation of what Whitehead accomplished so movingly in his novel: that the tragic histories of racial terrorism that we connect with slavery have a harsh and violent afterlife.

The sounds of silence

The legacy of the plantation is just as significant now, in the twenty-first century, as it was during the early days of the United States of America. It is Jenkins’ varied and startling, yet always so pertinent, choice of music to accompany the closing titles that most effectively expresses this idea. From Groove Theory’s Hey You to Donald Glover’s This Is America, there’s something for everyone. The connection between the stories of the past and the present is established not just visually, but also orally and aurally.

  • The final episode, which is centered on Cora’s mother, contains nearly little speech.
  • We can hear the ringing of the plantation bell to summon enslaved laborers to work, the snap of the slaveholder’s whip to punish, and the constant ticking of the clock while the captives are subjected to unspeakable horrors.
  • How they negotiated their life in a society in which they were considered legal property was the subject of this study.
  • And how, on a number of occasions, resistance was accompanied by feelings of hopelessness and despair.
  • Cora has a recurring dream in which she is trapped at a physical train station.
  • This dream has a plethora of different Black men and women, both male and female.
  • All of them have interesting stories to tell.
  • Photographs of Black men, women, and children at the station are taken one after another as the camera moves from picture to shot.
  • Old and young; families; old couples; lone people – those who have passed away, but whose stories have not been forgotten.
  • “Can you tell me how much time we have?” she inquires.
  • With these kinds of moments, Jenkins invites the audience to consider the lifetimes of suffering that these people have endured, as well as the requirement of time to relate their stories.

Find Adjectives to Describe Things

It occurred to me while I was working on the Related Terms engine (which functions similarly to a thesaurus, but provides a far larger range of related words rather than simply synonyms) that I should create a Describing Words engine. While experimenting with word vectors and the ” HasProperty ” API of conceptnet, I had a little bit of fun attempting to obtain the adjectives that are typically used to characterize a word in general usage. I eventually realized that there is a far more efficient method to accomplish this: parse books!

The parser simply goes through each book and extracts the numerous descriptions of nouns that are included inside them.

Hopefully, it will be more than just a novelty and some people will actually find it useful for their writing and brainstorming.

According to some estimates, the adjective “beautiful” is the most commonly used adjective for women in all of the world’s literature, which is consistent with the overall unidimensional image of women found in many other types of mass media.

The degree to which the findings are blue indicates their relative frequency.

As a default, the “uniqueness” sorting is used, and due to my Complicated AlgorithmTM, it arranges them according to how unique each adjective is to that particular noun in comparison to other nouns (which is actually very straightforward).

Thank you in particular to the contributors to the open-sourcemongodb database, which was used in this project.

Please keep in mind that Describing Words makes use of third-party scripts (such as Google Analytics and adverts) that set cookies on your computer. More information may be found in the privacy policy.

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