Which Correctly Describes The Purpose Of The Underground Railroad? (Correct answer)

  • During the era of slavery, the Underground Railroad was a network of routes, places, and people that helped enslaved people in the American South escape to the North. The name “Underground Railroad” was used metaphorically, not literally. It was not an actual railroad, but it served the same purpose—it transported people long distances.

What was the purpose of Underground Railroad?

The underground railroad, where it existed, offered local service to runaway slaves, assisting them from one point to another. Farther along, others would take the passenger into their transportation system until the final destination had been reached.

Which best describes the Underground Railroad?

Which of the following best describes the Underground Railroad? It was a piece of the transcontinental railroad that was built in Kansas. It was a group of abolitionists who were hiding out from the government. It was a secret escape network for enslaved people seeking freedom.

What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad quizlet?

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early-to-mid 19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.

What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad answers com?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. Involvement with the Underground Railroad was not only dangerous, but it was also illegal. So, to help protect themselves and their mission secret codes were created.

What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad Weegy?

The Underground Railroad was established to aid enslaved people in their escape to freedom.

Why was the Underground Railroad important to the Civil War?

The Underground Railroad physically resisted the repressive laws that held slaves in bondage. By provoking fear and anger in the South, and prompting the enactment of harsh legislation that eroded the rights of white Americans, the Underground Railroad was a direct contributing cause of the Civil War.

How might Colonel Lloyd have commented on this incident?

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Which of the following best describes the Wilmot Proviso quizlet?

Which of the following best describes the Wilmot Proviso? It was an amendment that barred slavery from any territory acquired from Mexico.

What was the legal status of slaves in the United States?

Slaves had few legal rights: in court their testimony was inadmissible in any litigation involving whites; they could make no contract, nor could they own property; even if attacked, they could not strike a white person.

How did the Underground Railroad lead to the Civil War quizlet?

How did the Underground Railroad cause the Civil War? *The Underground Railroad was a escape route for fugitive slaves in America. *Slaves would be helped by Northerners or “Quakers” who help slaves escape to Canada. *The Underground Railroad made the South mad because this was beneficial to slaves.

What was the Underground Railroad quizlet Chapter 11?

– The Underground Railroad was a system of trails and people used by slaves to escape to freedom before the Civil War. – Harriet Tubman used this trail to rescue slaves.

Was the Underground Railroad actually a railroad?

Nope! Despite its name, the Underground Railroad wasn’t a railroad in the way Amtrak or commuter rail is. It wasn’t even a real railroad. The Underground Railroad of history was simply a loose network of safe houses and top secret routes to states where slavery was banned.

When was the Underground Railroad used?

system used by abolitionists between 1800-1865 to help enslaved African Americans escape to free states.

How was the Underground Railroad successful?

The success of the Underground Railroad rested on the cooperation of former runaway slaves, free-born blacks, Native Americans, and white and black abolitionists who helped guide runaway slaves along the routes and provided their homes as safe havens.

Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad was a network of people, both black and white, who helped escaped enslaved persons from the southern United States by providing them with refuge and assistance. It came forth as a result of the convergence of numerous separate covert initiatives. Although the exact dates of its inception are unknown, it was active from the late 18th century until the Civil War, after which its attempts to weaken the Confederacy were carried out in a less-secretive manner until the Civil War ended.

Quaker Abolitionists

Underground Railroad was a network of people, both black and white, who helped escaped enslaved persons from the South by providing them with refuge and assistance. A number of separate covert operations came together to form the organization. Although the exact dates of its creation are unknown, it was active from the late 18th century until the Civil War, after which its attempts to weaken the Confederacy were carried out in a less-secretive manner until the Union was defeated.

What Was the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was a network of people, both African-American and white, who provided sanctuary and assistance to fugitive enslaved persons from the southern United States. It came to be as a result of the convergence of various separate covert operations in the past. Although the exact dates of its creation are unknown, it was active from the late 18th century until the Civil War, after which its attempts to weaken the Confederacy continued in a less-secretive manner.

How the Underground Railroad Worked

The majority of enslaved persons aided by the Underground Railroad were able to flee to neighboring states like as Kentucky, Virginia, and Maryland. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 made catching fugitive enslaved persons a lucrative industry in the deep South, and there were fewer hiding places for them as a result of the Act. The majority of fugitive enslaved people were on their own until they reached specific places farther north. The escaping enslaved people were escorted by individuals known as “conductors.” Private residences, churches, and schools were also used as hiding places throughout the war.

The personnel in charge of running them were referred to as “stationmasters.” There were several well-traveled roads that ran west through Ohio and into Indiana and Iowa.

The Little-Known Underground Railroad That Ran South to Mexico.

Fugitive Slave Acts

Those enslaved persons who were assisted by the Underground Railroad were primarily from border states like as Kentucky, Virginia, and Maryland (see map below). Fugitive slave capture became a lucrative industry in the deep South after the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793, and there were fewer hiding places for escaped slaves as a result. Refugee enslaved persons usually had to fend for themselves until they reached specified northern locations. In the runaway enslaved people’s journey, they were escorted by people known as “conductors.” Private residences, churches, and schools were among the hiding spots.

Stationmasters were the individuals in charge of running them.

Others traveled north via Pennsylvania and into New England, while others passed through Detroit on their route to the Canadian border. More information may be found at: The Little-Known Underground Railroad That Ran South to Mexico.

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was the most well-known conductor of the Underground Railroad during its heyday. When she and two of her brothers fled from a farm in Maryland in 1849, she was given the name Harriet (her married name was Tubman). She was born Araminta Ross, and she was raised as Harriet Tubman. They returned a couple of weeks later, but Tubman fled on her own again shortly after, this time making her way to the state of Pennsylvania. In following years, Tubman returned to the plantation on a number of occasions to rescue family members and other individuals.

Tubman was distraught until she had a vision of God, which led her to join the Underground Railroad and begin escorting other fugitive slaves to the Maryland state capital.

Frederick Douglass

She was the most well-known conductor of the Underground Railroad, and her name is Harriet Tubman. In 1849, she and two of her brothers managed to escape from a farm in Maryland, where they were born into slavery under the name Araminta Ross. Harriet Tubman was her married name at the time. While they did return a few of weeks later, Tubman set out on her own shortly after, making her way to the state of Pennsylvania. In following years, Tubman returned to the plantation on a number of occasions to rescue family members and other people.

Tubman was distraught until she had a vision of God, which led her to join the Underground Railroad and begin escorting other runaway slaves to the Maryland state capital of Fredericksburg.

Who Ran the Underground Railroad?

Harriet Tubman was the most well-known conductor of the Underground Railroad during her lifetime. When she and two of her brothers fled from a farm in Maryland in 1849, she was given the name Harriet Tubman (her married name was Araminta Ross). They returned a couple of weeks later, but Tubman fled on her own shortly after, making her way to Pennsylvania. In the following years, Tubman returned to the plantation on a number of occasions to rescue family members and others. She attempted to rescue her spouse on her third trip, but he had remarried and refused to go.

Tubman transported large numbers of fugitives to Canada on a regular basis, believing that the United States would not treat them favorably.

John Brown

Harriet Tubman was the most well-known conductor on the Underground Railroad. When she and two of her brothers fled from a farm in Maryland in 1849, she was given the name Harriet (her married name was Tubman). She was born Araminta Ross, and she was an enslaved woman. They returned a few weeks later, but Tubman departed on her own shortly after, making her way to Pennsylvania. Tubman later returned to the plantation on a number of occasions to rescue family members and others. On her third journey, she attempted to rescue her husband, but he had remarried and refused to leave.

Tubman was distraught until she had a vision of God, which led her to join the Underground Railroad and begin leading other escaped slaves to Maryland. Tubman transported groups of fugitives to Canada on a regular basis, believing that the United States would not treat them fairly.

End of the Line

Operation of the Underground Railroad came to an end in 1863, during the American Civil War. In actuality, its work was shifted aboveground as part of the Union’s overall campaign against the Confederate States of America. Once again, Harriet Tubman made a crucial contribution by organizing intelligence operations and serving as a commanding officer in Union Army efforts to rescue the liberated enslaved people who had been freed. MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: Harriet Tubman led a daring Civil War raid after the Underground Railroad was shut down.

See also:  What Was A Conductor In The Underground Railroad? (The answer is found)

Sources

During the American Civil War, the Underground Railroad came to an end about 1863. When it came to the Union fight against the Confederacy, its activity was carried out aboveground. This time around, Harriet Tubman played a critical role in the Union Army’s efforts to rescue the recently liberated enslaved people by conducting intelligence operations and serving in the role of leadership. FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE READ THESE STATEMENTS. Harriet Tubman Led a Brutal Civil War Raid Following the Underground Railroad.

Underground Railroad

When describing a network of meeting spots, hidden routes, passages, and safehouses used by slaves in the United States to escape slave-holding states and seek refuge in northern states and Canada, the Underground Railroad was referred to as the Underground Railroad (UR). The underground railroad, which was established in the early 1800s and sponsored by persons active in the Abolitionist Movement, assisted thousands of slaves in their attempts to escape bondage. Between 1810 and 1850, it is estimated that 100,000 slaves escaped from bondage in the southern United States.

Facts, information and articles about the Underground Railroad

When describing a network of meeting spots, hidden routes, passages, and safehouses used by slaves in the United States to escape slave-holding states and seek refuge in northern states and Canada, the Underground Railroad was referred to as the Underground Railroad. The underground railroad, which was established in the early 1800s and sponsored by persons active in the Abolitionist Movement, assisted thousands of slaves in their attempts to flee their bonds of slavery. Between 1810 and 1850, it is estimated that 100,000 slaves escaped from slavery in the South.

Constitution.

Ended

When describing a network of meeting locations, hidden routes, passages, and safehouses used by slaves in the United States to escape slave-holding states and seek refuge in northern states and Canada, the Underground Railroad was employed. The Underground Railroad, which was established in the early 1800s and sponsored by persons active in the Abolitionist Movement, assisted thousands of slaves in their attempts to escape bondage. Between 1810 and 1850, it is estimated that 100,000 slaves escaped from bondage in the Southern United States.

A system of safe houses and abolitionists anxious to free as many slaves as possible assisted them in their escape, despite the fact that such efforts violated state laws and the United States Constitution.

Slaves Freed

The Underground Railroad was a name used to describe a network of meeting sites, hidden routes, passages, and safehouses that slaves in the United States used to escape from slave-holding states to northern states and Canada. The underground railroad, which was established in the early 1800s and sponsored by persons participating in the Abolitionist Movement, assisted thousands of slaves in escaping their bonds. Between 1810 and 1850, it is estimated that 100,000 slaves escaped from bondage in the South.

Prominent Figures

Harriet Tubman is a historical figure. William Still is a well-known author and poet. Levi Coffin is a fictional character created by author Levi Coffin. John Fairfield is a well-known author.

Related Reading:

Harriet Tubman is a historical figure who lived during the American Civil War. She was a pioneer in the fight against slavery. William Still is an American author and poet. Levi Coffin is a fictional character created by the author Levi Coffin in the fictional world of the novel Levi Coffin John Fairfield is a well-known author and illustrator.

The Beginnings Of the Underground Railroad

Even before the nineteenth century, it appears that a mechanism to assist runaways existed. In 1786, George Washington expressed dissatisfaction with the assistance provided to one of his escaped slaves by “a organization of Quakers, founded for such purposes.” The Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers as they are more officially known, were among the first abolitionist organizations to emerge. Their influence may have played a role in Pennsylvania becoming the first state to abolish slavery, which was home to a large number of Quakers.

In recognition of his contributions, Levi is often referred to as the “president of the Underground Railroad.” In Fountain City, Ohio, on Ohio’s western border, the eight-room Indiana home they bought and used as a “station” before they came to Cincinnati has been preserved and is now a National Historic Landmark.

The Underground Railroad Gets Its Name

Runaway assistance appears to have occurred well before the nineteenth century. During the Revolutionary War, George Washington expressed dissatisfaction with the assistance provided to one of his fugitive slaves by “a organization of Quakers, created specifically for this reason.” The Religious Society of Friends, or Quakers as they are more officially known, were among the first abolitionist organizations to emerge in the nineteenth century. It is possible that their influence had a role in Pennsylvania becoming the first state to abolish slavery, given it was home to many Quakers at the time.

Due to his role in the Underground Railroad, Levi is sometimes referred to as its president.

“Eliza” was one of the slaves who hid within it, and her narrative served as the inspiration for the character of the same name in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s abolitionist novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin (published in 1852).

Conductors On The Railroad

A “conductor,” who pretended to be a slave, would sometimes accompany fugitives to a plantation in order to lead them on their journey. Harriet Tubman, a former slave who traveled to slave states 19 times and liberated more than 300 people, is one of the most well-known “conductors.” She used her shotgun to threaten death to any captives who lost heart and sought to return to slavery. The Underground Railroad’s operators faced their own set of risks as well. If someone living in the North was convicted of assisting fugitives in their escape, he or she could face fines of hundreds or even thousands of dollars, which was a significant sum at the time; however, in areas where abolitionism was strong, the “secret” railroad was openly operated, and no one was arrested.

His position as the most significant commander of the Underground Railroad in and around Albany grew as time went on.

However, in previous times of American history, the phrase “vigilance committee” generally refers to citizen organizations that took the law into their own hands, prosecuting and hanging those suspected of crimes when there was no local government or when they considered the local authority was corrupt or weak.

White males who were found assisting slaves in their escape were subjected to heavier punishments than white women, but both were likely to face at the very least incarceration.

The Civil War On The Horizon

A “conductor,” who pretended to be a slave, would sometimes accompany fugitives to a plantation in order to direct them on their journey. Harriet Tubman, a former slave who traveled to slave states 19 times and liberated more than 300 people, is one of the most well-known “conductors.” She used her shotgun to threaten the lives of those who lost hope and sought to return to slavery. The Underground Railroad’s operators faced their own set of perils while they worked. In the North, if someone was convicted of assisting fugitives in their escape, he or she could face fines of hundreds or even thousands of dollars, which was a significant sum at the time; however, in areas where abolitionism was strong, the “secret” railroad operated in full view of the general public.

His position as the most prominent commander of the Underground Railroad in and around Albany grew as time went along.

However, in other eras of American history, the term “vigilance committee” was frequently used to refer to citizen groups that took the law into their own hands, prosecuting and lynching people accused of crimes when no local authority existed or when they believed that authority was corrupt or insufficient.

Stricter punishments were meted out to white males who assisted slaves in escaping than to white women, but both were likely to face at the very least incarceration.

The most severe punishments, such as hundreds of lashing with a whip, burning, or hanging, were reserved for any blacks who were discovered in the process of assisting fugitive fugitives on the run.

The Reverse Underground Railroad

A “reverse Underground Railroad” arose in the northern states surrounding the Ohio River during the Civil War. The black men and women of those states, whether or not they had previously been slaves, were occasionally kidnapped and concealed in homes, barns, and other structures until they could be transported to the South and sold as slaves.

The Underground Railroad

There has sprung up a “reverse Underground Railroad” in northern states that border the Ohio River. The black men and women of those states, whether or whether they had previously been slaves, were occasionally kidnapped and concealed in homes, barns, and other structures until they could be transported to the South and sold as slaves there.

Home of Levi Coffin

A “reverse Underground Railroad” developed in the northern states surrounding the Ohio River. Even though they had never been slaves, black men and women were occasionally kidnapped in those areas and concealed in homes, barns, and other facilities until they could be transported to the South and sold as slaves.

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A “reverse Underground Railroad” developed in northern states surrounding the Ohio River. Black men and women, whether or not they had previously been slaves, were occasionally abducted in those states and concealed in homes, barns, and other structures until they could be transported to the South and sold as slaves.

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Introduction-Aboard the Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad refers to the effort -sometimes spontaneous, sometimes highly organized – to assist persons held in bondage in North America to escape from slavery.While most runaways began their journey unaided and many completed their self-emancipation without assistance, each decade in which slavery was legal in the United States saw an increase in the public perception of an underground network and in the number of persons willing to give aid to the runaway. Although divided, the abolitionist movement was successful in expanding the informal network known as the underground railroad and in publicizing it.The term “underground railroad” had no meaning to the generations before the first rails and engines of the 1820s, but the retrospective use of the term in is made so as to include incidents which have all the characteristics of underground railroad activity, but which occurred earlier.These activities foreshadowed and helped to shape the underground railroad.The origin of the term “underground railroad” cannot be precisely determined.What is known is that both those who aided escapees from slavery and those who were outraged by loss of slave property began to refer to runaways as part of an “underground railroad” by 1840.The “underground railroad” described an activity that was locally organized, but with no real center.It existed rather openly in the North and just beneath the surface of daily life in the upper South and certain Southern cities.The underground railroad, where it existed, offered local service to runaway slaves, assisting them from one point to another.Farther along, others would take the passenger into their transportation system until the final destination had been reached. The rapidity with which the term became commonly used did not mean that incidents of resistance to slavery increased significantly around 1830 or that more attempts were made to escape from bondage. It did mean that more white northerners were prepared to aid runaways and to give some assistance to the northern blacks who had always made it their business to help escapees from slavery. The primary importance of the underground railroad was that it gave ampleevidence of African American capabilities and gave expression to AfricanAmerican philosophy. Perhaps the most important factor or aspect tokeep in mind concerning the underground railroad is that its importanceis not measured by the number of attempted or successful escapes fromAmerican slavery, but by the manner in which it consistently exposedthe grim realities of slavery and -more important- refuted the claimthat African Americans could not act or organize on their own. The secondaryimportance of the underground railroad was that it provided an opportunityfor sympathetic white Americans to play a role in resisting slavery.It also brought together, however uneasily at times, men and women ofboth races to begin to set aside assumptions about the other race andto work together on issues of mutual concern. At the most dramatic level,the underground railroad provided stories of guided escapes from theSouth, rescues of arrested fugitives in the North, complex communicationsystems, and individual acts of bravery and suffering. While most ofthe accounts of secret passageways, sliding wall panels, and hiddenrooms will not be verified by historic evidence, there were indeed sufficientdramas to be interpreted and verified.Visitors may be interested inHistoricHotels of America, a program of the National Trust for HistoricPreservation, located near the places featured in this itinerary.List of Sites|HomeComments or Questions Last Modified:EST

Stories from the Underground Railroad, 1855-56

William Still was an African-American abolitionist who risked his life on several occasions in order to aid slaves from their captivity. After reading these extracts, readers will have the opportunity to read some of the letters Still received from abolitionists and former slaves. They offer light on issues like as family separation, the financial expenses of escaping to freedom, and the logistical challenges faced by those on the Underground Railroad. Appellation on behalf of a destitute slave in Petersburg, Virginia, written by John H.

  1. STILL, MY DEAR FRIEND: —I’m writing to let you know that Miss Mary Wever has arrived in this city in good health.
  2. H.
  3. I believe they will tie the knot as soon as they are able to get ready.
  4. Hill will begin putting the items together the next day.
  5. It is not my responsibility to inform you of his situation because Miss Wever has already informed you of it in detail.
  6. Tell my uncle to travel to Richmond and inquire as to the location of this individual.
  7. He doesn’t have a lot of money.

We shall, on the other hand, raise all of the money that is needed to ensure his safe arrival.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Bustill writes a letter to the editor (U.G.R.R.

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1956.

These people got here this morning about 8:45 a.m.

I would appreciate it if you could email me any information that you think would be of interest to them.

This is our first instance, and I am hopeful that it will turn out to be a complete success.

This Road was chosen because it allowed us to gain time; it is predicted that the owners would arrive in town this afternoon, and by using this Road, we gained five hours of valuable time, which we may need in the future.

S.

Depot) to the editor.

When responding, use the term “goods” in your response.

Bustill, who lives in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, about three weeks ago.

Jones in Elmira, and the next day they were out looking for the package again; it was delivered safely to Elmira, according to a letter I received from Jones, and everything is in order.

The date was September 28, 1856.

SIR:— I take the opportunity of writing to you a few lines about my children because I am so anxious to obtain them and I would appreciate it if you could kindly do everything you can to help me.

Joseph G.

Nash, a sister-in-law of Dr.

You may find her by asking for Dr.

And I have faith in you to attempt whatever you believe would be the most effective method.

Yours Respectfully, Jefferson Pipkins is a fictional character created by author Jefferson Pipkins.

I currently reside in Yorkville, which is close to Toronto Canada West.

Still has received my wife’s heartfelt condolences.

WELCOME, OLD FRIEND STILL:—I am writing to you on behalf of Mrs.

She hails from the city of Washington.

She is making a pit stop in our city and expresses a strong desire to hear back from her children.

Biglow, of Washington City.

As I’m sure you’re aware, she is quite concerned about her children.

She is interested in learning whether Mr.

She would appreciate it if you will write to Mr.

She extends her heartfelt greetings to you and your loved ones.

Please address your letter to me, dear brother, and I will see that it is sent to her on her behalf.

Watkins went for Ithaca, New York, and other destinations in that section of the state.

Watkins, and other notables; Gerritt Smith was also there.

We have a great deal of admiration for her.

The FBI has apprehended 31 fugitives in the previous twenty-seven days; however, we are confident that you have apprehended many more than that.

I am, of course, yours truly, J.W.

He is the author of the book J.W.

Loguen: A Novel, ed.

The Underground Railroad: A Record(Philadelphia: PorterCoates, 1872), pages 41, 43, 378, 137, and 158. William Still, The Underground Railroad: A Record(Philadelphia: PorterCoates, 1872), pages 41, 43, 378, 137, and 158. Google Books has a copy of this book.

William Still’s National Significance · William Still: An African-American Abolitionist

Who is William Still, and what is his background? During the antebellum period in American history, William Still, a free-born Black man, rose to prominence as a leader of the abolitionist movement and as a writer. He was also one of the most successful Black businessmen in the history of the city of Philadelphia, and he was born in the city of Philadelphia. He was the youngest of eighteen children born to Levin and Charity Still on October 7, 1821, in Burlington County, New Jersey, and was the youngest of their eighteen children.

His father purchased his freedom, and his mother was able to flee slavery in Maryland with the help of a relative.

The virtues of family and effort that his parents instilled in him, together with pride and self-determination, have served him well throughout his life.

After completing his apprenticeship that year, he was employed to work as a clerk at The Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery.

The enactment of the Escaped Slave Act of 1850 resulted in Still’s appointment as head of the society’s resurrected Vigilance Committee, which assisted and supported fugitive Africans.

See also:  What Is The Name Of The Church In Magnolia, De That Was Part Of The Underground Railroad? (TOP 5 Tips)

He had no formal education at the time, but he read all he could get his hands on and studied grammar.

He was given the authority to chronicle African resistance to slavery, as well as to write letters to his family and friends and handle commercial affairs.

Still submitted a letter to the newspaper in 1859, expressing his displeasure with the racial prejudice that African Americans were subjected to aboard Philadelphia streetcars.

In his self-published book The Underground Railroad (1872), William Still chronicled the tales of Africans who had been slaves but had earned their freedom via the use of the Underground Railroad.

He engaged literary agents to help him market the book.

He died in 1876.

In 1874, he authored An Address on Voting and Laboring, in which he defended his support for the reform candidate for mayor of Philadelphia, as opposed to the Republican candidate for mayor of the city.

After a forty-year quest, he was able to track down his brother, Peter Still, and assist him in his escape to freedom.

Still, he shown great courage in aiding escaped Africans, even at the danger of his own life.

He was an outspoken supporter of universal suffrage.

As a result of his fame, he was assigned to the Philadelphia Board of Trade in 1861 and, in 1864, to the position of peddler for the food of black troops at Camp William Penn in Pennsylvania.

He also served as a member of the Freedmen’s Aid Commission and was instrumental in the establishment of one of the first YMCAs for black youth.

Justification for the importance of William Still’s collection on a national scale The William Still Papers, which span the years 1865 to 1899, are housed at the Charles L.

It is estimated that Still’s documents contain 140 letters referring to family concerns, as well as 14 images.

As a vital contributor to the success of the Underground Railroad activities in Philadelphia, William Still was an integral member of the city’s free Black population, which played an important role in the Underground Railroad.

Runaways were able to get to safety in the North because to his efforts with the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery’s Vigilance Committee.

His work The Underground Railroad is well-known around the world.

Since the passage of H.R.

Blockson Afro-American Collection to investigate William Still’s papers, which are housed in the Charles L.

This act permitted the establishment of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom program by the United States National Park Service, which was tasked with the identification of Underground Railroad locations and the popularization of the Underground Railroad movement.

The personal communication of William Still and his family members offers scholars with an insight into the personal lives of William Still and his relatives. For further information about William Still, please visit the following:

  • Who is William Still, and what is his history? During the antebellum period of American history, William Still, a free-born Black man, rose to prominence as a leader of the abolitionist movement and as a writer. Aside from that, he was one of the most successful African-American merchants in the city’s history. The youngest of eighteen children, Levin Still, was born on October 7, 1821, in Burlington County, New Jersey, to Levin and Charity Still. Slavery was a way of life for both of his parents from birth. Slavery was abolished in Maryland, and his father purchased his freedom through a bribe. With strong memories from his childhood of the atrocities of slavery, William Still grew up in the South. The virtues of family and effort that his parents instilled in him, together with pride and self-determination, have served him well throughout his life. As early as 1844, he relocated to Philadelphia, where he met and married Letitia George, who would become the mother of his four children. After completing his apprenticeship that year, he was employed to work as a clerk by The Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery. He became an active agent on the Underground Railroad, supporting runaway Africans who came to Philadelphia in their pursuit of freedom and independence. With the passing of the Escaped Slave Act of 1850, Still was chosen head of the society’s revitalized Vigilance Committee, which helped and supported fugitive African slaves across the United States. The Most Important Achievements of William Still The fact that William Still was able to teach himself how to read and write at an era in American history when laws were passed preventing Blacks, particularly enslaved African Americans, from learning to read and write is one of his most notable achievements. His official education was still in its early stages, but he read everything he could get his hands on and diligently studied grammar. This process of learning evolved into a kind of African resistance to slavery over the course of several centuries. Abolitionists in Africa were documenting their battle against slavery, and he was given the authority to write letters to his family and friends and transact business. He rose to prominence as a civil rights activist in the North, persistently striving to improve racial relations. African Americans were discriminated against on Philadelphia streetcars in 1859, and Still took to the newspaper to express his dissatisfaction. The publication of A Brief Narrative of the Struggle for the Rights of Colored People of Philadelphia in the City Railway Cars in 1867 was a watershed moment in the history of race relations in the United States. In his self-published book The Underground Railroad (1872), William Still chronicled the tales of Africans who had been slaves but had earned their freedom via the use of the Underground Railroad to flee slavery. In Still’s The Underground Railroad, an African American author provides the first first-person account of Black actions on the Underground Railroad that has been authored and self-published by an African-American. His novel was sold via the assistance of literary agencies. He published three versions of his book, which was displayed during the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in the year 1876. But I’d still like to write some more! In 1874, he authored An Address on Voting and Laboring, in which he explained why he supported the reform candidate for mayor of Philadelphia rather than the Republican candidate. As a leader of the abolitionist movement, William Still was instrumental in the emancipation of hundreds of enslaved Africans. His brother, Peter Still, was apprehended and assisted in his escape to freedom after a forty-year hunt. After locating his brother, he fled to the United States and began keeping comprehensive documents of African resistance to slavery. Still, he shown great courage in aiding escaped Africans, even at the risk of his own safety. Among his accomplishments was his role in organizing and funding the Pennsylvania Civil, Social, and Statistical Association, which gathered information on emancipated men and women. A proponent of universal suffrage, his work was well-documented. As a successful businessman, he invested in real estate, founded a new and used stove and coal company, and finally established a coal yard in 1861, among other endeavors. His notoriety led to his appointment to the Philadelphia Board of Trade, and he was then assigned to the position of peddler for the food of black troops at Camp William Penn in 1864. A proponent of temperance, he was also the driving force behind the establishment of a mission Sabbath School for the Presbyterian Church. Also a member of the Freedmen’s Aid Commission, he helped to establish one of the earliest YMCAs for black youth and participated in the administration of homes for the elderly and poor black children as well as an orphanage for the children of black soldiers and sailors during the American Civil War. Justification for the importance of William Still’s collection on a national level The William Still Papers, which date from 1865 to 1899, are housed at the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection. 140 letters dealing to Still’s family concerns are included in the collection, along with 14 images. Several members of the Still family, who live in the area, made a generous donation to the Blockson Collection. A vital contributor to the success of Underground Railroad activities in Philadelphia, William Still was a member of Philadelphia’s free Black community, which played an important role in the Underground Railroad’s operations. A large number of Africans who had escaped enslavement and were on their way to Canada were accommodated by him personally in Philadelphia. Through his work with the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery’s Vigilance Committee, he was able to obtain cash to aid runaways and organize their transportation to freedom in the northern states. Many of Harriet Tubman’s journeys to the South to liberate enslaved Africans were made possible because of his contributions to the cause of freedom. World-renowned author Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s work The Underground Railroad is widely read across the world. His detailed records are crucial not just for demonstrating that Blacks possess intellectual aptitude, but also for demonstrating that they were active participants in their own liberation efforts. Since the passage of H.R. 1635 by Congress in 1997, researchers from all over the world have asked about and visited the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection to investigate William Still’s papers, which are now part of the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection. This act permitted the establishment of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom program by the United States National Park Service, which was tasked with the identification of Underground Railroad locations and the popularization of the Underground Railroad in the United States. Furthermore, the program recognized William Still, a notable Underground Railroad agent who worked in a significant hub of the abolitionist movement, as having national significance. Researchers might get insight into the personal lives of William Still and his family members by studying William Still’s personal letters. See the following links for further information about William Still:

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