Who Is Abigail In The Underground Railroad? (Suits you)

During the 1830s, Abigail Goodwin became involved with black abolitionist William Still, chairman of the Vigilance Committee in Philadelphia, some forty miles away. She emerged as an activist for the abolitionist and Underground Railroad movements, working with abolitionists in Salem.

Where does Abigail live in A Wrinkle in time?

  • Abigail is a friendly African American woman who lives in the dormitories in South Carolina, near Cora. Old Abraham is a male slave who has lived for many years on the Randall plantation. Ajarry was just a girl when she was kidnapped in Africa and sold into slavery in America.

Who is Abigail Goodwin?

Abigail Goodwin was a Quaker woman living in New Jersey who helped hide and support fugitive slaves.

Who is the most famous person in the Underground Railroad?

HARRIET TUBMAN – The Best-Known Figure in UGR History Harriet Tubman is perhaps the best-known figure related to the underground railroad. She made by some accounts 19 or more rescue trips to the south and helped more than 300 people escape slavery.

Who were major leaders of the Underground Railroad?

8 Key Contributors to the Underground Railroad

  • Isaac Hopper. Abolitionist Isaac Hopper.
  • John Brown. Abolitionist John Brown, c.
  • Harriet Tubman.
  • Thomas Garrett.
  • William Still.
  • Levi Coffin.
  • Elijah Anderson.
  • Thaddeus Stevens.

Who were the major players in the Underground Railroad and what was their role?

The Underground Railroad had many notable participants, including John Fairfield in Ohio, the son of a slaveholding family, who made many daring rescues, Levi Coffin, a Quaker who assisted more than 3,000 slaves, and Harriet Tubman, who made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom.

How old would Harriet Tubman be today?

Harriet Tubman’s exact age would be 201 years 10 months 28 days old if alive. Total 73,747 days. Harriet Tubman was a social life and political activist known for her difficult life and plenty of work directed on promoting the ideas of slavery abolishment.

Who ended slavery?

In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation declaring “all persons held as slaves… shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free,” effective January 1, 1863. It was not until the ratification of the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, in 1865, that slavery was formally abolished ( here ).

What did Levi Coffin do?

Levi Coffin, (born October 28, 1798, New Garden [now in Greensboro], North Carolina, U.S.—died September 16, 1877, Cincinnati, Ohio), American abolitionist, called the “President of the Underground Railroad,” who assisted thousands of runaway slaves on their flight to freedom.

Who was the head of the Underground Railroad?

Harriet Tubman (1822-1913), a renowned leader in the Underground Railroad movement, established the Home for the Aged in 1908. Born into slavery in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman gained her freedom in 1849 when she escaped to Philadelphia.

Who were the pilots of the Underground Railroad?

Using the terminology of the railroad, those who went south to find enslaved people seeking freedom were called “pilots.” Those who guided enslaved people to safety and freedom were “conductors.” The enslaved people were “passengers.” People’s homes or businesses, where fugitive passengers and conductors could safely

Does the Underground Railroad still exist?

It includes four buildings, two of which were used by Harriet Tubman. Ashtabula County had over thirty known Underground Railroad stations, or safehouses, and many more conductors. Nearly two-thirds of those sites still stand today.

How did Fairfield help slaves escape?

Posing as a slaveholder, a slave trader, and sometimes a peddler, Fairfield was able to gain the confidence of whites, which made it easier for him to lead runaway slaves to freedom. One of his most impressive feats was freeing 28 slaves by staging a funeral procession.

Who was John Brown in history?

John Brown, (born May 9, 1800, Torrington, Connecticut, U.S.—died December 2, 1859, Charles Town, Virginia [now in West Virginia]), militant American abolitionist whose raid on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now in West Virginia), in 1859 made him a martyr to the antislavery cause and was instrumental

Is the Underground Railroad a true story?

Adapted from Colson Whitehead’s Pulitzer-award-winning novel, The Underground Railroad is based on harrowing true events. The ten-parter tells the story of escaped slave, Cora, who grew up on The Randall plantation in Georgia.

Key People

Between 1830 and 1850, Stephen Myers rose to prominence as the most significant leader of a local underground railroad organization that spanned the United States and the world. Other notable persons came and left during this time period, but Myers remained in Albany the entire time. Stephen Myers is without a doubt responsible for assisting thousands of people to travel via Albany on the subterranean railroad to locations west, north, and east. First, in the early 1840s, he relied on his personal resources and those of the Northern Star Association, which he chaired and was responsible for publishing the publication of his journal.

Some people considered the Albany branch of the underground railroad to be the best-run section of the railroad in the entire state when it was under his direction.

Throughout his life, he worked as a grocer and a steamboat steward, but it was in 1842 that he began his journalistic career.

He was a strong advocate for anti-slavery activism as well as for the rights of African Americans in the United States.

  • He writes on temperance, the rights of African Americans, the necessity of abolishing slavery, and a variety of other topics in its pages.
  • It is from Garland Penn’s book The Afro-American Press and Its Editors that the photograph of Stephen Meyers that is used to accompany this text was taken.
  • Several pieces of information on him may also be found in the notes offered to one of the essays made by him that was published in The Black Abolitionist Papers, volume 3, edited by C.
  • The Albany Evening Times published an article on Monday, February 14, 1870, in the evening.
  • This man, who was the oldest and most renowned of our colored inhabitants, passed away in the early hours of yesterday morning, at the age of eighty-one.
  • Myers has been eventful, since he has lived through the majority of the most important epochs in the history of our country.
  • He also worked as a steward on certain North River steamboats for a period of time during the early part of the twentieth century, which was a very significant role in those days.
  • He was a well-known figure among his race, having worked as an agent for the “Underground Railroad” before the war.
  • Years ago, he was THE representation of them in their dealings with the leaders of this state.
  • Mr.
  • Mr.

Mr. Myers was a devout Christian who died as a witness to the religion that he had lived. Wednesday afternoon’s burial will take place at the A M. E. Church on Hamilton Street.

The Wayside and the Underground Railroad – Minute Man National Historical Park (U.S. National Park Service)

The National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom program, which is sponsored by the National Park Service, includes the Wayside as a component. As part of our national civil rights movement, this program commemorates and preserves the historical significance of the Underground Railroad, which sought to address the injustices of slavery and make freedom a reality in the United States. The Underground Railroad was a critical component in the development of our national civil rights movement.

Slavery in Concord Pre-Revolution

The institution of slavery was established shortly after the arrival of European colonists, and it had a profound influence on every area of Anglo-European life, even the little village of Concord. Samuel Whitney, a merchant, representative to the Provincial Congress, and muster master of the Concord Minute Men, enslaved two men in his home, which is now known as The Wayside, in Concord, Massachusetts. When the American Revolutionary War began, Samuel Whitney’s family was one of twelve enslaved households in Concord, Massachusetts.

Despite the fact that the specifics of Casey’s voyage remain a mystery, he was able to return to Concord as a free man following the war.

Enslavers and Patriots

During the American Revolutionary War, colonial patriots expressed their dedication to the battle for independence and took the first military stand against British rule in April 1775, they did so while keeping a solid hold on the institution of human slavery. Everyone was perplexed by this apparent contradiction. “I question if Liberty is so a constricted an idea as to be Confined to any country under Heaven; nay, I believe it is not hyperbolic to assert, that Even an Affrican, has Equally as good a claim to his Liberty in conjunction with Englishmen,” wrote Lemuel Haynes, an African American Patriot.

After the Revolution

People of color battled for their freedom in a variety of ways, including through a series of lawsuits that have come to be known as the Freedom Suits. When the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled slavery to be incompatible with the state’s 1780 constitution, it was the first time in the country. Although the state did not completely abolish slavery, these triumphs heralded the beginning of a period of gradual liberation. For more information about Freedom Suits, please see their website.

Unfortunately, the system of slavery spread rapidly across the United States.

By the early 1800s, a significant population of free African Americans and other freedom seekers had emerged in Boston.

They were immediately endangered by the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850, which was passed in 1850. The Boston African American National Historical Site provides further information on this community. Louisa May Alcott was an American author and poet who lived during the early twentieth century.

Freedom Seekers at Hillside

It was held by Bronson and Abigail Alcott, whose children were named Anna, Louisa, Elizabeth, and May, by April of 1845. The Wayside was originally known as “Hillside.” Their family was involved in abolitionist groups in Concord and around the United States, and the Alcotts were among the most renowned abolitionists in Concord. The Alcotts provided assistance to at least one freedom seeker on his way to freedom through the Underground Railroad between late 1846 and early 1847. An extensive network of safe houses and sympathetic persons assisted in the transportation of freedom seekers out of slavery.

  • Alcott wrote the following letter to her brother in January 1847: “We’ve had an intriguing fugitive in our midst for the past two weeks—he hails from Maryland.
  • His torment has been immense, and his tenacity is unmatched in the world.
  • He claims that it is the only way that the abolition of slavery will ever be accomplished.
  • A national boycott of commodities made with slave labor was advocated by the family in the goal of bringing about a speedy settlement; but, the system remained in place for another eighteen years, until the American Civil War.
  • He possesses many of the characteristics of a hero.
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Eastern Illinois University : Teaching with Primary Sources

However, many of the intriguing and lesser known elements of the Underground Railroad are not included in many textbooks, despite the fact that it is an essential part of our nation’s history. It is intended that this booklet will serve as a window into the past by presenting a number of original documents pertaining to the Underground Railroad. Broadsides, prize posters, newspaper clippings, historical records, sheet music, pictures, and memoirs connected to the Underground Railroad are among the primary sources included in this collection.

The Underground Railroad was a covert structure established to assist fugitive slaves on their journey to freedom in the United States.

As a result, secret codes were developed to aid in the protection of themselves and their purpose.

Runaway slaves were referred to as cargo, and the free persons who assisted them on their journey to freedom were referred to as conductors.

Stations were the names given to the safe homes that were utilized as hiding places along the routes of the Underground Railroad. These stations would be identified by a lantern that was lighted and hung outside.

A Dangerous Path to Freedom

Traveling through the Underground Railroad to seek their freedom was a lengthy and risky trek for escaped slaves. Runaway slaves were forced to travel long distances, sometimes on foot, in a short amount of time in order to escape. They accomplished this while surviving on little or no food and with little protection from the slave hunters who were rushing after them in the night. Slave owners were not the only ones who sought for and apprehended fleeing slaves. For the purpose of encouraging people to aid in the capture of these slaves, their owners would post reward posters offering monetary compensation for assisting in the capture of their property.

  1. Numerous arrested fugitive slaves were beaten, branded, imprisoned, sold back into slavery, or sometimes killed once they were apprehended.
  2. They would have to fend off creatures that wanted to kill and devour them while trekking for lengthy periods of time in the wilderness, as well as cross dangerous terrain and endure extreme temperatures.
  3. The Fleeing Slave Law of 1850 permitted and promoted the arrest of fugitive slaves since they were regarded as stolen property rather than mistreated human beings under the law at the time.
  4. They would not be able to achieve safety and freedom until they crossed the border into Canada.
  5. Aside from that, there were Underground Railroad routes that ran south, on their way to Mexico and the Caribbean.
  6. He was kidnapped from his northern abode, arrested, and prosecuted in Boston, Massachusetts, under the provisions of this legislation.
  7. After the trial, Burns was returned to the harshness of the southern states, from which he had thought he had fled.

American Memory and America’s Library are two names for the Library of Congress’ American Memory and America’s Library collections.

He did not escape via the Underground Railroad, but rather on a regular railroad.

Since he was a fugitive slave who did not have any “free papers,” he had to borrow a seaman’s protection certificate, which indicated that a seaman was a citizen of the United States, in order to prove that he was free.

Unfortunately, not all fugitive slaves were successful in their quest for freedom.

Harriet Tubman, Henry Bibb, Anthony Burns, Addison White, Josiah Henson, and John Parker were just a few of the people who managed to escape slavery using the Underground Railroad system.

He shipped himself from Richmond, Virginia, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in a box that measured three feet long, two and a half feet deep, and two feet in diameter. When he was finally let out of the crate, he burst out singing.

ConductorsAbolitionists

Train conductors on the Underground Railroad were free persons who provided assistance to escaped slaves moving via the Underground Railroad system. Runaway slaves were assisted by conductors, who provided them with safe transportation to and from train stations. They were able to accomplish this under the cover of darkness, with slave hunters on their tails. Many of these stations would be in the comfort of their own homes or places of work, which was convenient. They were in severe danger as a result of their actions in hiding fleeing slaves; nonetheless, they continued because they believed in a cause bigger than themselves, which was the liberation thousands of oppressed human beings.

  • They represented a diverse range of ethnicities, vocations, and socioeconomic backgrounds.
  • Due to the widespread belief that slaves were considered property, the freeing of slaves was perceived as a theft of slave owners’ personal belongings.
  • Captain Jonathan Walker was apprehended off the coast of Florida while attempting to convey slaves from the United States to freedom in the Bahamas.
  • With the following words from one of his songs, abolitionist poet John Whittier paid respect to Walker’s valiant actions: “Take a step forward with your muscular right hand, brave ploughman of the sea!
  • She never lost sight of any of them during the journey.
  • He went on to write a novel.
  • John Parker is yet another former slave who escaped and returned to slave states in order to aid in the emancipation of others.

Rankin’s neighbor and fellow conductor, Reverend John Rankin, was a collaborator in the Underground Railroad project.

The Underground Railroad’s conductors were unquestionably anti-slavery, and they were not alone in their views.

Individuals such as William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur and Lewis Tappan founded the American Anti-Slavery Society, which marked the beginning of the abolitionist movement.

The group published an annual almanac that featured poetry, paintings, essays, and other abolitionist material.

Frederick Douglass was an escaped slave who rose to prominence as an abolitionist after escaping from slavery.

His other abolitionist publications included the Frederick Douglass Paper, which he produced in addition to delivering public addresses on themes that were important to abolitionists.

Anthony was another well-known abolitionist who advocated for the abolition of slavery via her speeches and writings.

For the most part, she based her novel on the adventures of escaped slave Josiah Henson.

Efforts of Abolitionists Telling Their Story:Fugitive Slave Narratives

Henry Bibb was born into slavery in Kentucky in the year 1815, and he was the son of a slave owner. After several failed efforts to emancipate himself from slavery, he maintained the strength and persistence to continue his struggle for freedom despite being captured and imprisoned numerous times. His determination paid off when he was able to successfully escape to the northern states and then on to Canada with the assistance of the Underground Railroad, which had been highly anticipated. The following is an excerpt from his tale, in which he detailed one of his numerous escapes and the difficulties he faced as a result of his efforts.

  • I began making preparations for the potentially lethal experiment of breading the shackles that tied me as a slave as soon as the clock struck twelve.
  • On the twenty-fifth of December, 1837, the long-awaited day had finally arrived when I would put into effect my previous determination, which was to flee for Liberty or accept death as a slave, as I had previously stated.
  • It took every ounce of moral strength I have to keep my emotions under control as I said goodbye to my small family.
  • Despite the fact that every incentive was extended to me in order to flee if I want to be free, and the call of liberty was booming in my own spirit, ‘Be free, oh, man!
  • I was up against a slew of hurdles that had gathered around my mind, attempting to bind my wounded soul, which was still imprisoned in the dark prison of mental degeneration.
  • Furthermore, the danger of being killed or arrested and deported to the far South, where I would be forced to spend the rest of my days in hopeless bondage on a cotton or sugar plantation, all conspired to discourage me.
  • The moment has come for me to follow through on my commitment.
  • This marked the beginning of the construction of what was known as the underground rail route to Canada.

For nearly forty-eight hours, I pushed myself to complete my journey without food or rest, battling against external difficulties that no one who has never experienced them can comprehend: “not knowing when I might be captured while traveling among strangers, through cold and fear, braving the north winds while wearing only a thin layer of clothing, pelted by snow storms through the dark hours of the night, and not a single house in which I could enter to protect me from the storm.” This is merely one of several accounts penned by runaway slaves who were on the run from their masters.

Sojourner Truth was another former slave who became well-known for her work to bring slavery to an end.

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Green and many others, including Josiah Henson, authored autobiographies in which they described their own personal experiences.

Perhaps a large number of escaped slaves opted to write down their experiences in order to assist people better comprehend their struggles and tribulations; or perhaps they did so in order to help folks learn from the mistakes of the past in order to create a better future for themselves.

The Underground Railroad review: A remarkable American epic

The Underground Railroad is a wonderful American epic, and this is my review of it. (Photo courtesy of Amazon Prime) Recently, a number of television shows have been produced that reflect the experience of slavery. Caryn James says that this gorgeous, harrowing adaptation of Colson Whitehead’s novel, nevertheless, stands out from the crowd. T The visible and the invisible, truth and imagination, all come together in this magnificent and harrowing series from filmmaker Barry Jenkins to create something really unforgettable.

  1. Jenkins uses his own manner to pick out and emphasize both the book’s brutal physical realism and its inventiveness, which he shapes in his own way.
  2. In the course of her escape from servitude on a Georgia plantation, the main heroine, Cora, makes various stops along the railroad’s path, all the while being chased relentlessly by a slavecatcher called Ridgeway.
  3. More along the lines of: eight new television series to watch in May–the greatest new television shows to watch in 2021 thus far– Mare of Easttown is a fantastic thriller, according to our evaluation.
  4. Jenkins uses this chapter to establish Cora’s universe before taking the story in a more fanciful path.
  5. The scenes of slaves being beaten, hung, and burned throughout the series are all the more striking since they are utilized so sparingly throughout the series.
  6. (Image courtesy of Amazon Prime) Eventually, Cora and her buddy Caesar are forced to escape the property (Aaron Pierre).
  7. Ridgeway (Joel Edgerton, in another of his quietly intense performances) is determined to find Cora because Reading about a true subterranean railroad is one thing; but, witnessing it on television brings the concept one step closer to becoming a tangible reality.

It’s not much more than a dark tunnel and a handcar at one of the stops.

In South Carolina, she makes her first stop in a bright, urbane town where a group of white people educate and support the destinies of black people.

Cora is dressed in a fitted yellow dress and cap, attends classes in a classroom, and waltzes with Caesar at a dance in the town square, which is lit by lanterns at night.

She plays the part of a cotton picker, which she recently played in real life, and is on show behind glass.

Every one of Cora’s moves toward liberation is met with a painful setback, and Mbedu forcefully expresses her rising will to keep pushing forward toward the future in every scene she appears in.

The imaginative components, like the environment, represent her hopes and concerns in the same way.

Jenkins regularly depicts persons standing frozen in front of the camera, their gaze fixed on us, which is one of the most effective lyrical touches.

Even if they are no longer physically present in Cora’s reality, they are nonetheless significant and alive with importance.

Jenkins, on the other hand, occasionally deviates from the traditional, plot-driven miniseries format.

Ridgeway is multifaceted and ruthless, never sympathetic but always more than a stereotypical villain, thanks to Edgerton’s performance.

The youngster is completely dedicated to Ridgeway, who is not officially his owner, but whose ideals have captured the boy’s imagination and seduced him.

Some white characters quote passages from the Bible, claiming that religion is a justification for slavery.

Nothing can be boiled down to a few words.

The cinematographer James Laxton and the composer Nicholas Britell, both of whom collaborated on Moonlight and Beale Street, were among the key colleagues he brought with him to the project.

Despite the fact that he is excessively devoted to the beauty of backlight streaming through doors, the tragedy of the narrative is not mitigated by the beauty of his photos.

An ominous howling noise can be heard in the background, as though a horrible wind is coming into Cora’s life.

Slavery is sometimes referred to as “America’s original sin,” with its legacy of injustice and racial divide continuing to this day, a theme that is well conveyed in this series.

Its scars will remain visible forever.” ★★★★★ The Underground Railroad will be available on Amazon Prime Video starting on May 14th in other countries.

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Flight to Freedom

TIME TO COMPLETE: 1.5-2 HOURS ESTIMATED It is the year 1848. You play the role of Lucy King, a 14-year-old girl who is enslaved on a farm in Kentucky. Will you be able to discover a way to freedom? PLEASE BE AWARE OF THE FOLLOWING: Flight to Freedom, which was produced with Adobe Flash and was formerly available online, will no longer be available as of January 20, 2021. Our team has begun reconstructing this game in Unity, with the goal of bringing it back online by 2022. The downloaded PC and Mac versions (links to which can be found on this page under “Play Offline”) are still accessible and should be compatible with the vast majority of PCs and older Macs that are not running the most recent operating system.

Get to Know the Characters It is necessary to have Adobe Flash Player version 11.3.0 or above installed in order to access this page.

Meet the Characters

More information may be found by hovering your cursor over a character.

Esther

Esther works as a chef as well as a house slave on the Master King’s estate in the South. Given the fact that she spends her days in the “Big House,” Esther is privy to much of Master King’s business and is able to pass along information to other slaves. At the Lexington market, Esther does some shopping for the family and picks up some information from other enslaved employees and free blacks who are there to trade information.

Reverend John Rankin

John Rankin (1793-1886) was a Presbyterian preacher who began his career preaching in Tennessee before being compelled to relocate when he publicly expressed his anti-slavery sentiments. After settling in Ripley, Ohio, Rankin became a vocal abolitionist who was actively involved in the Underground Railroad movement. He had a significant impact on abolitionists such as William Lloyd Garrison, Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe and other abolitionists around the country with his “Letters on Slavery.” Rankin resided in Ripley in a mansion perched high on a hill with a panoramic view of the hamlet and the Ohio River.

The house where Rankin lived is presently designated as a National Historic Landmark.

Nell

Nell is the mother of Lucy and Jonah. Nell works as a field laborer on the estate of Master King. She is responsible for hemp planting, hoeing, weeding, harvesting, and bundling. Nell has a permit that allows her to see her husband on a neighboring plantation on a regular basis, which she takes advantage of.

Henry

Henry is a nineteen-year-old field laborer on Master King’s estate, and he is the son of a slave. Lucy’s family considers Henry to be a close friend. In addition to his responsibilities in the fields, Henry is also in charge of maintaining the smokehouse, which includes chopping wood and keeping the fire going whenever hogs have been killed and are ready to be smoked.

The King plantation had been sold the year before, and Henry’s family had been relocated. Henry is a strong-willed individual with a short fuse. Over the course of the past year, he has disappeared for days at a time.

Mrs. Porter

Mrs. Porter, together with her husband, is in charge of the Ripley Hotel. The motel is located directly across the street from the Ohio River ferry pier. Mrs. Porter, who is originally from Kentucky, feels that slavery is good to both slaves and slave owners. Customers from Kentucky account for a large portion of the hotel’s business.

Jonah

Jonah is an eight-year-old enslaved laborer on Master King’s farm, and he is the protagonist of the story. He is the younger brother of Lucy.

Millie Hatcher

Millicent Hatcher is a twenty-one-year-old teacher who studied under Harriet Beecher Stowe at the Hartford Female Seminary in Hartford, Connecticut. She was an active abolitionist who travelled west to Ohio to teach in the Red Oak School, which was under the direction of Reverend Rankin, an abolitionist leader.

Lucy

A fourteen-year-old enslaved laborer on Master King’s hemp plantation, which is about 20 miles outside of Lexington, Kentucky, Lucy’s story begins. Lucy is Nell’s daughter, and she lives with her mother. After a poor crop, Lucy’s father was sold to the Preston plantation, which was only a few miles distant. Her father is only sometimes able to visit her. Lucy is a strong-willed individual who has put herself into problems for expressing herself. Even though she has gotten older, she has maintained a friendship with the master’s daughter, Sarah, with whom she has spent her childhood.

Abigail Wright

Abigail and her husband Morgan Wright are a free African-American couple who live in Red Oak, Ohio, just north of Ripley. Abigail is a writer and her husband is a musician. Those who came before them were Virginia slaves who were emancipated during the American Revolution and relocated in the Ohio River Valley by their proprietors. The Wrights are the owners and operators of a laundry service that serves both individuals and businesses in the community. They are abolitionists who are involved in the Underground Railroad.

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Sarah King

Sarah is the fifteen-year-old daughter of Tobias King (Lucy’s owner), and she is the protagonist of the novel. Sarah used to play with Lucy when she was younger, but she now considers herself an adult and the slaves’ boss. Currently, Sarah’s principal focus is on finding a good partner and getting married within the next several years. The current fashions are something she keeps up with by reading ladies’ publications on a regular basis.

John Parker

After escaping slavery in Alabama and being recaptured, John Parker (1827-1900) was able to purchase his own freedom via a series of transactions. In 1849, he relocated to Ripley, Ohio, where he got involved in the Underground Railroad movement. Parker was rumored to have traveled into Kentucky in order to assist slaves crossing the Ohio River. The ironworker was one of the rare African Americans to obtain many patents throughout the nineteenth century, and he was a proficient iron worker.

Parker later became the owner of his own foundry, where he developed and manufactured farm implements and equipment. His Ripley residence is designated as a National Historic Landmark.

Mr. Otis

Mr. Otis is the plantation’s supervisor, and he works for Master King. Mr. Otis is in charge of Master King’s enslaved labor and farming activities, among other things. Mr. Otis, in contrast to Lucy and her family, receives a wage. He is a severe overseer who employs punishment—and the threat of punishment—to compel slaves to work harder and longer hours.

Benjamin Harrison

Benjamin Harrison is a politician and member of the Free Soil Party from Cincinnati, Ohio. He is a member of the Free Soil Party. He is competing for a seat in the state legislature as a state representative. Harrison opposes the spread of slavery into the western territories, but he does not argue for the abolition of slavery on an instant basis in the United States. Because he believes that liberated slaves would never be able to become equal citizens in the United States, he favors the notion of government-sponsored colonization, which would include transporting freed slaves to the African nation of Liberia.

T.C. Bercham

T.C. Bercham is a slave catcher headquartered in the Kentucky city of Lexington.

Esther

Esther works as a chef as well as a house slave on the Master King’s estate in the South. Given the fact that she spends her days in the “Big House,” Esther is privy to much of Master King’s business and is able to pass along information to other slaves. At the Lexington market, Esther does some shopping for the family and picks up some information from other enslaved employees and free blacks who are there to trade information.

Reverend John Rankin

John Rankin (1793-1886) was a Presbyterian preacher who began his career preaching in Tennessee before being compelled to relocate when he publicly expressed his anti-slavery sentiments. After settling in Ripley, Ohio, Rankin became a vocal abolitionist who was actively involved in the Underground Railroad movement. He had a significant impact on abolitionists such as William Lloyd Garrison, Henry Ward Beecher, Harriet Beecher Stowe and other abolitionists around the country with his “Letters on Slavery.” Rankin resided in Ripley in a mansion perched high on a hill with a panoramic view of the hamlet and the Ohio River.

The house where Rankin lived is presently designated as a National Historic Landmark.

Nell

Nell is the mother of Lucy and Jonah. Nell works as a field laborer on the estate of Master King. She is responsible for hemp planting, hoeing, weeding, harvesting, and bundling. Nell has a permit that allows her to see her husband on a neighboring plantation on a regular basis, which she takes advantage of.

Henry

Henry is a nineteen-year-old field laborer on Master King’s estate, and he is the son of a slave. Lucy’s family considers Henry to be a close friend. In addition to his responsibilities in the fields, Henry is also in charge of maintaining the smokehouse, which includes chopping wood and keeping the fire going whenever hogs have been killed and are ready to be smoked.

The King plantation had been sold the year before, and Henry’s family had been relocated. Henry is a strong-willed individual with a short fuse. Over the course of the past year, he has disappeared for days at a time.

Mrs. Porter

Mrs. Porter, together with her husband, is in charge of the Ripley Hotel. The motel is located directly across the street from the Ohio River ferry pier. Mrs. Porter, who is originally from Kentucky, feels that slavery is good to both slaves and slave owners. Customers from Kentucky account for a large portion of the hotel’s business.

Jonah

Jonah is an eight-year-old enslaved laborer on Master King’s farm, and he is the protagonist of the story. He is the younger brother of Lucy.

Millie Hatcher

Millicent Hatcher is a twenty-one-year-old teacher who studied under Harriet Beecher Stowe at the Hartford Female Seminary in Hartford, Connecticut. She was an active abolitionist who travelled west to Ohio to teach in the Red Oak School, which was under the direction of Reverend Rankin, an abolitionist leader.

Lucy

A fourteen-year-old enslaved laborer on Master King’s hemp plantation, which is about 20 miles outside of Lexington, Kentucky, Lucy’s story begins. Lucy is Nell’s daughter, and she lives with her mother. After a poor crop, Lucy’s father was sold to the Preston plantation, which was only a few miles distant. Her father is only sometimes able to visit her. Lucy is a strong-willed individual who has put herself into problems for expressing herself. Even though she has gotten older, she has maintained a friendship with the master’s daughter, Sarah, with whom she has spent her childhood.

Abigail Wright

Abigail and her husband Morgan Wright are a free African-American couple who live in Red Oak, Ohio, just north of Ripley. Abigail is a writer and her husband is a musician. Those who came before them were Virginia slaves who were emancipated during the American Revolution and relocated in the Ohio River Valley by their proprietors. The Wrights are the owners and operators of a laundry service that serves both individuals and businesses in the community. They are abolitionists who are involved in the Underground Railroad.

Sarah King

Sarah is the fifteen-year-old daughter of Tobias King (Lucy’s owner), and she is the protagonist of the novel. Sarah used to play with Lucy when she was younger, but she now considers herself an adult and the slaves’ boss. Currently, Sarah’s principal focus is on finding a good partner and getting married within the next several years. The current fashions are something she keeps up with by reading ladies’ publications on a regular basis.

John Parker

After escaping slavery in Alabama and being recaptured, John Parker (1827-1900) was able to purchase his own freedom via a series of transactions. In 1849, he relocated to Ripley, Ohio, where he got involved in the Underground Railroad movement. Parker was rumored to have traveled into Kentucky in order to assist slaves crossing the Ohio River. The ironworker was one of the rare African Americans to obtain many patents throughout the nineteenth century, and he was a proficient iron worker.

Parker later became the owner of his own foundry, where he developed and manufactured farm implements and equipment. His Ripley residence is designated as a National Historic Landmark.

Mr. Otis

Mr. Otis is the plantation’s supervisor, and he works for Master King. Mr. Otis is in charge of Master King’s enslaved labor and farming activities, among other things. Mr. Otis, in contrast to Lucy and her family, receives a wage. He is a severe overseer who employs punishment—and the threat of punishment—to compel slaves to work harder and longer hours.

Benjamin Harrison

Benjamin Harrison is a politician and member of the Free Soil Party from Cincinnati, Ohio. He is a member of the Free Soil Party. He is competing for a seat in the state legislature as a state representative. Harrison opposes the spread of slavery into the western territories, but he does not argue for the abolition of slavery on an instant basis in the United States. Because he believes that liberated slaves would never be able to become equal citizens in the United States, he favors the notion of government-sponsored colonization, which would include transporting freed slaves to the African nation of Liberia.

T.C. Bercham

T.C. Bercham is a slave catcher headquartered in the Kentucky city of Lexington.

The Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia: Film Review

Despite its horribly bad, franchise-motivated effort at a title, The Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia is a solid horror sequel. Before sliding into standard horror film bombast, the film does manage to provide some excellent scares. Even though it has absolutely no link to the 2009 horror picture starring Virginia Madsen and Martin Donovan, this unassuming ghost story directed by Tom Elkinsmay well startle a few people on VOD and DVD if it doesn’t get a wide distribution in theaters.

The film, which is supposedly based on a true story, is set in Georgia.

What’s the bottom line?

Heidi is soon visited by an apparition of the home’s most recent owner, whose motives are unclear and may or may not be malign in nature.

When the story takes a turn late in the film, and a more evil part of the house’s history is revealed, the film culminates in the kind of hell breaking loose conclusion that is characteristic of such stories.

In addition, the legendary Cicely Tyson makes a poignant cameo appearance as an old woman who has a particular connection to the property.

A welcome change from the gore-filled horror entertainment that normally dominates movie theaters, even if its attempt to inject socially aware philosophical weight into the tale comes off as more awkward than believable.

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