Who Is Eliza Based On In The Underground Railroad? (TOP 5 Tips)

Is Eliza’s story the dominant narrative about the Underground Railroad?

  • Historians agree that in the second half of the nineteenth century and for most of the twentieth, folks who could tell a story of the Underground Railroad could tell Eliza‘s story. But I argue that it is no longer the dominant narrative about the Underground Railroad.

Was Eliza Harris a real person?

In his memoirs, published in 1876, Coffin described the escape of Eliza Harris, supposedly the real-life model for the character of Eliza in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Who is Eliza in Uncle Tom’s Cabin?

Eliza. Eliza is a slave and personal maid to Mrs. Shelby, who escapes to the North with her five-year-old son Harry after he is sold to Mr. Haley. Her husband, George, eventually finds Eliza and Harry in Ohio and emigrates with them to Canada, then France, and finally Liberia.

Who was the woman in the Underground Railroad?

Known as the “Moses of her people,” Harriet Tubman was enslaved, escaped, and helped others gain their freedom as a “conductor” of the Underground Railroad.

Who used the story of Eliza Harris escape in her novel?

Conclusion: Back To Eliza For approximately one century, the harrowing escape constructed by Harriet Beecher Stowe and the producers of the Tom Shows stuck; in fact, it worked better than any of the true stories.

How did Eliza cross the river in Uncle Tom’s Cabin?

In that terrible moment her feet scarcely seemed to touch the ground. The next, she was at the water’s edge. On they came behind her. With one wild cry and flying leap, she​jumped right over the water by the shore, on to the raft of ice beyond.

Who did Eliza Harris stay with in Greenfield?

The story goes that Eliza Harris and her husband, George, escaped across the Ohio River in December 1837 and made their way to Greenfield. There, they stayed in a barn behind Dr. Milton Dunlap’s house located at the northeast corner of Jefferson and Washington. George was ill, so they stayed until he recuperated.

Who is Tom Loker?

Tom Loker. A slave hunter hired by Mr. George shoots him when he tries to capture them, and, after he is healed by the Quakers, Loker experiences a transformation and chooses to join the Quakers rather than return to his old life.

Is Uncle Tom’s Cabin still banned?

Stowe herself received many threatening letters from Southern critics – one included the severed ear of a slave. Today, Uncle Tom’s Cabin is banned for a variety of other reasons. In 1984, Uncle Tom’s Cabin was ”forbidden” in a Waukegan, Illinois school district for its inclusion of racial slurs.

Is Uncle Tom’s Cabin a true story?

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin was inspired by the memoir of a real person: Josiah Henson. Maryland attorney Jim Henson outside the cabin where his relative, Josiah Henson, lived as a slave.

Is Gertie Davis died?

Her mission was getting as many men, women and children out of bondage into freedom. When Tubman was a teenager, she acquired a traumatic brain injury when a slave owner struck her in the head. This resulted in her developing epileptic seizures and hypersomnia.

How old would Harriet Tubman be today?

Harriet Tubman’s exact age would be 201 years 10 months 28 days old if alive. Total 73,747 days. Harriet Tubman was a social life and political activist known for her difficult life and plenty of work directed on promoting the ideas of slavery abolishment.

What was Uncle Tom?

Uncle Tom is the title character of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s 1852 novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. This led to the use of Uncle Tom – sometimes shortened to just a Tom – as a derogatory epithet for an exceedingly subservient person or house negro, particularly one aware of their own lower-class racial status.

Meet the Underground Railroad conductors who hosted Harriet Tubman in central Pa.

Rolling fields of maize and corn that are maturing. Fences are neatly arranged in rows. A well-kept two-story sandstone farmhouse with an expansion on the back side. Outbuildings that are kept in good condition, as well as a huge barn to keep the abundant crop. People traveled from far and wide to see this agrarian marvel, which was one of the most recognized farms in northern York County, Pennsylvania, during the mid-19th century. The huge farm, which is located along rural Steinhour Road in Newberry Township, southeast of Lewisberry, used to be overworked and played-out due to its location.

Dilapidated.

And it had now become a showcase for agricultural prowess.

It wasn’t only the tranquil, green backdrop of a model farm or the period; it was also the uniqueness of the proprietors.

  • At the time, only a small number of black families in Pennsylvania held their own farms.
  • The Baptistes greeted and entertained the guests, as well as displaying the luscious rewards of their labor and the labor of their equally hard-working children, as they arrived.
  • Although Baptiste’s grandfather had been born into slavery in Maryland, he was able to accumulate enough money to purchase his freedom.
  • An aerial map depicts the site of Ezekiel and Eliza Baptiste’s property in rural Newberry Township, Pennsylvania, where they operated as Underground Railroad agents.
  • As a young man, the religious Ezekiel was enraged by the injustice he witnessed in his surroundings.
  • During the Civil War, he began supporting escaped slaves in their search for freedom, assisting them in reaching the Mason-Dixon Line.
  • It was most likely there that he first encountered abolitionist firebrand and insurrectionist John Brown, who would go on to become the architect of the infamous unsuccessful attack on Harper’s Ferry, which claimed the lives of Brown and many of his comrades.

They immediately began restoring the property and structures.

Baptiste devoured every anti-slavery journal he could get his hands on, including William Lloyd Garrison’s The Liberator, which was published in 1848.

Goodridge in downtown York.

According to later conversations with Baptiste, he and Eliza had the pleasure of entertaining Harriet Tubman at some time.

Catherine’s in southern Canada.

The Baptiste family relocated to the Mechanicsburg region sometime about 1875 after selling their property for $4,500 (which was a substantial sum in those days).

Eventually, Ezekiel became involved with a group of farmers who had been professionally commissioned to work as “horse detectives.” They looked into complaints of horse stealing in the townships of Upper Allen and East Pennsboro, respectively.

He paid visits to former partners in Philadelphia, Boston, and other major cities on a regular basis. Ezekiel Baptiste, previously considered to be one of York County’s most unusual farmers, passed away in the middle of July 1893. PublishedUpdated

Eliza Winston – Wikipedia

Eliza Winston (ca. 1830–?) was an enslaved American from Mississippi who was emancipated from her masters while on vacation with her masters in Minnesota, which was then a free state at the time. The woman was granted a hearing in court, where she stated that she and her late husband had purchased her freedom from a previous owner, but that the transaction had not been honored. She was rescued from her Mississippi captors and may have been assisted on her journey to Canada, but there is no record of what happened to her after that point.

Events

advertisement for the Winslow House, published in 1860 A thirty-year-old enslaved woman named Eliza Winston was transported to St. Anthony, Minnesota by her owners, Richard and Mary Christmas, of Issaquena County, Mississippi. She died there in the summer of 1860. When the yellow fever season began, it was common for rich southern visitors to travel up the Mississippi River to northern sites during the summer months in order to avoid the dangers of the yellow fever epidemic. They employed domestic slaves as household staff.

  • Anthony, Minnesota, which was still a free state at the time of their visit.
  • As she testified in her deposition, she and her late husband had previously purchased her freedom; however, Ralph Christmas had acquired her from her prior owner, Mr.
  • Minnesota was a free state, and Judge Charles Vandenburgh decided to hear her case because he believed it was important.
  • When the sheriff came, the Christmas family attempted to conceal Winston, but when she was apprehended, they did not put up any more of a fight.
  • According to the Saint AnthonyWeekly Express, the event would have a negative impact on the tourism industry.
  • It has been suggested that Winston would revert to servitude if she returned to a slave state, based on interpretations of the Dred Scott decision from 1857.

See also

  • Emily O. (Goodridge) Grey’s father, William C. Goodridge, was an abolitionist and the father of Emily O. (Goodridge) Grey.

References

A narrative of optimism, tenacity, and the triumph of the human spirit, as described by the New York Times. “Alma Powell, the former Secretary of State Colin Powell’s wife” A sad and terrifying journal entry by Eliza is transformed by Nolen into a rich and uplifting novel, much like the little slave girl who watches a cook mix tears into stew. Despite the fact that there is enough history in this book to make it mandatory reading, the intensity of Eliza’s voice makes this journey back in time a gripping page turner rich with accurate data.

  • ” “The finest stories take us on a journey, make us pleased that we were able to accompany them on their adventure, and leave us a little sad that the voyage has come to an end.” “This is exactly the kind of narrative.” Nikki Grimes is a model and actress.
  • Despite the fact that Eliza’s mother was sold at a slave auction, Eliza has managed to survive with the help of another slave woman, Abbey, and by keeping near to her heart the stories and the narrative quilt that her mother passed down to her.
  • The stories Eliza hears from her mother, each one keyed to a square in the quilt and perfectly appropriate for the position she finds herself in, accompany her on her perilous voyage.
  • Nolen’s writing is a pleasure to read.
  • Eliza’s Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diary.
  • map.
  • Web sites.” – “KIRKUS, “December 15, 2010” Publishing house: SS/Paula Wiseman Bks.

Hardcover $14.99; digital $9.99.

The LC number is not accessible.

As a result of Sir selling her mother a year earlier, Eliza has only her motherly cook Abbey, an abandoned notebook that Abbey encourages her to write in, and a tale quilt that her mother created for her.

After enlisting the assistance of a mysterious Harriet Tubman herself, Eliza manages to flee to freedom in Ontario, where she is reunited with her mother by coincidence.

Riva Pollard is a sixth-grade teacher at Prospect Sierra Middle School in El Cerrito, California.

Paperback $14.99, ISBN 978-1-4169-5814-7; digital $9.99, ISBN 978-1-4424-1723-6; Library of Congress number unknown.

As a result of Sir selling her mother a year earlier, Eliza has only her motherly cook Abbey, an abandoned notebook that Abbey encourages her to write in, and a tale quilt that her mother created for her.

After enlisting the assistance of a mysterious Harriet Tubman herself, Eliza manages to flee to freedom in Ontario, where she is reunited with her mother by coincidence.

-Riva Pollard, Prospect Sierra Middle School in El Cerrito, California.

Nolen transforms Eliza’s depressing and terrifying journal into a fascinating and powerful novel.

Jerdine Nolen brings Eliza to life in a way that transports you right along with her on the trek north, the path to freedom.” Pat Cummings is the author of this piece.

I’m grateful to Jerdine Nolen for having the ingenuity and bravery to create this piece.

It is through history and imagination that we will be able to endure.

NOLEN, Jerdine, Elizas Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diary, SS/Paula Wiseman Books, 2011, 160 pages, map, bibliography, web resources, SS/Paula Wiseman Bks.

This book is available in paperback or ebook format for $9.99.

The LC number is not accessible.

As a result of Sir selling her mother a year earlier, Eliza has only her motherly cook Abbey, an abandoned notebook that Abbey encourages her to write in, and a tale quilt that her mother created for her.

After enlisting the assistance of a mysterious Harriet Tubman herself, Eliza manages to flee to freedom in Ontario, where she is reunited with her mother by coincidence.

The narrative suffers from poor characterizations and odd pace, which is caused by the forced pauses she takes to record her mother’s stories.

In the words of the SLJ in February 2011, “This is not a book for yesterday, but for tomorrow.” The fact that Jerdine Nolen had the vision and bravery to write this is a great relief to me.

“It is through history and imagination that we will survive.” Nikki Giovanni is a poet who lives in Los Angeles.

The fact that Jerdine Nolen had the vision and bravery to write this is a great relief to me.

“It is through history and imagination that we will survive.” —Nikki Giovanni, author of poetry “Like the little slave girl who stands by and watches a cook’stirring tears into.stew,’ Nolen transforms Eliza’s sad and scary journal into a rich and uplifting novel.” Despite the fact that there is enough history in this book to make it mandatory reading, the intensity of Eliza’s voice makes this journey back in time a gripping page turner rich with real information.

Jerdine Nolen brings Eliza to life in a way that transports you right along with her on the journey north. “The journey to liberation.” —Pat Cummings et al.

About the Author

Jerdine Nolen is the beloved author of many award-winning books, including Big Jabe; Thunder Rose, which was named a Coretta Scott King Illlustrator Honor Book; and Hewitt Anderson’s Great Big Life, which was named a Bank Street Best Book of the Year. All of her books are illustrated by Kadir Nelson, including Big Jabe, Thunder Rose, and Hewitt Anderson’s Great Big Life. Her other works include Eliza’s Freedom Road, illustrated by Shadra Strickland, which was nominated for an ALA/YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults Award; Raising Dragons, illustrated by Elise Primavera, which won the Christopher Award; andHarry Potter’s Balloon Farm, illustrated by Mark Buehner, which was adapted into a film of the same name.

  1. Her other works include Calico Girl, which was named a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year, and Irene’s Wish, which was praised by Kirkus Reviews as “delightful and unforgettable” in a starred review and was named a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year.
  2. Nolen is a schoolteacher who resides in the Maryland town of Ellicott City.
  3. She received the Ezra Jack Keats Award as well as the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award for New Talent in 2009 for her work on Bird, a picture book written by Zetta Elliott, for which she received both awards.
  4. She is a professor of illustration at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, where she lives.
See also:  Which Former Slave Was Important To The Underground Railroad? (Correct answer)

Beyond the Quest for the “Real Eliza Harris”: Fugitive Slave Women in the Ohio Valley

Beyond the Search for the Authentic The Obio Valley is home to fugitive slave women like Eliza Harris.” KEITH GRIFFLER is an American actor and director. There were several famous slave escapees during the nineteenth century, but Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and Joseph Henson were among the best-known. Uncle Tom’s Cabin author Harriet Beecher Stowe’s fictitious character Eliza Harris was the subject of the photograph. During that runaway bestseller, the most widely read work of the abolitionist movement, a young enslaved woman named Eliza flees her Kentucky home on the southern shore of the Ohio River and makes a daring escape across the frozen surface, which has already been broken up into floating cakes of ice, to Ohio, where abolitionists conduet her to Canada, where she eventually dies.

  1. After her capture, Eliza Harris became somewhat of a figure for what was known as the ” panting fugitive,” in Victorian parlance.
  2. The true heroes of the drama that unfolded north of the border with slavery were almost unknown to an audience that had taken such an interest in mere figments of Stowe’s imagination as the characters in her novels.
  3. 2 One of the best examples of what historian Larry Gara has referred to as the “legend of the Underground Railroad” prevailing over the actual reality is the ongoing search for the identification of Eliza Harris, who is believed to be the “genuine” Eliza Harris.
  4. UNCLE TON’S CABIN; LIFE AMONG TILE LO’ I.
  5. ‘S„ f, T.
  6. IT.
  7. BOSTON: A number of years after the publishing of her masterpiece with the subsequent Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecber released the sequel Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecber.
  8. JEWETTCOMPANY Tom’s Cabin is a place where people go to get away from it all.

As part of her research into the Filson slave life, she produced a thorough book that she claimed had “the actual facts Historical Society and documents on which the tale is based.” She added a reference to the Eliza Harris escape narrative in the piece, claiming that it was based on an actual incident.

Given permission by the author, notable Underground Railroad figures such as William Mitchell, Levi Coffin, John Parker, and a son of Rev.

While she was there, her attention was drawn to a lovely quadroon girl who was sitting in one of the church’s pews and looked to be in charge of a group of little children.

Inquiring about the girl after the author returned from church led to the discovery of the following information: she was as kind and charming as she was beautiful; she was also a religious girl who was a member of the church; and finally, she was owned by Mr.

The thought that this girl was a slave sent shivers down her spine, and she expressed her concern by saying, passionately, “0, I hope they treat her well.” “Certainly,” was the reply; “they consider of her as much as they do of their own children.” Stowe claimed in her Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin that she based the physical description of Eliza Harris on a “quadroom girl” she had seen while traveling through Kentucky.

As he did so, he made the following statement: “yc venient at all p’ints aloi small tasks in our line qu.” This website makes use of cookies to guarantee that you have the best possible experience while visiting our site.

It is possible that your experience will be less flawless if cookies are not used.

The Underground Railroad in Indiana

For 30 years before to the American Civil War, enslaved African Americans utilized the Underground Railroad to gain their freedom, a network known as the Underground Railroad (1861-1865). The “railroad” employed a variety of routes to transport people from slave-supporting states in the South to “free” states in the North and Canada. Sometimes abolitionists, or persons who were opposed to slavery, were responsible for organizing routes for the Underground Railroad. Most of the time, the network consisted of a succession of tiny, individual activities to assist enslaved persons who were deemed fugitives.

  • Indiana, whose citizens are referred to as Hoosiers, was one of the original free states.
  • Enslaved persons were captured and returned to the South by those who resided across the river from Kentucky, which was a slave state.
  • Taking Care of Business on the Underground Railroad It should be noted that contrary to common assumption, the Underground Railroad was not a network of underground passageways.
  • Using railroad terminology, individuals who traveled south to locate persons who had been enslaved and were seeking freedom were referred to as “pilots” by the railroad.
  • Individuals that were enslaved were referred to as “passengers.” “Stations” were private residences or commercial establishments where passengers and conductors seeking freedom might take refuge.
  • If a new owner supported slavery, or if the residence was revealed to be a station on the Underground Railroad, passengers and conductors were obliged to locate a new station or move on somewhere.
  • Only a small number of people retained records of this clandestine work in order to safeguard homeowners and freedom seekers who needed assistance.

People who were detected assisting fugitive freedom seekers were subjected to arrest and imprisonment.

No one knows exactly how the Underground Railroad received its name, nor does anybody care.

Another version of the story assigns the name to a freedom-seeker who was apprehended in Washington, D.C., in the year 1839.

A third narrative connects the name to an enslaved man called Tice Davids, who made the decision to pursue his freedom in 1831, according to the legend.

Unfortunately, there was no boat available to take us over the river.

His enslaver returned to Kentucky without him, claiming that Davids had vanished while traveling on a “underground railroad.” To put it another way, the name “Underground Railroad” had been widely accepted by the mid-1840s.

Slavery was prohibited north of the Ohio River under Article 6 of the Northwest Ordinance, but the prohibition did not apply to enslaved persons who had already established themselves in the area north of the river.

Slavery was a common feature of life in the Northwest Territories at the time.

Indiana was established as a territory in 1800, with future President of the United States William Henry Harrison serving as its first territorial governor.

Harrison and his followers also believed that permitting slavery in Indiana would increase the state’s population.

Their petition was refused by Congress.

The “contract holder” has the authority to determine how long the victim must be held in slavery.

As soon as Indiana became a state in 1816, its stateConstitutioncontained wording that was comparable to Article 6 of the Northwest Ordinance—new enslaved individuals were not permitted, but those who were already slaves were allowed to stay so.

The term “slave” was still used to describe some Hoosiers as late as the 1820 census.

(White people were exempt from this requirement.) Indiana’s 1851 Constitution prohibited blacks from voting, serving in the military, or testifying in any trial in which a white person was accused of a crime.

All three pathways eventually went to Michigan and subsequently to Canada, although they took different routes.

Lewis Harding said in a 1915 history of Decatur County, Indiana, that the county was a spot where three roads came together after crossing the Ohio River at separate points in the county.

assisted the escaped slaves in every way imaginable,” he adds, using the injunction as an example.

As Harding says, “the sympathies of the majority of the residents of this nation were with the escaped slave and his rescuer.” Historians now feel that the path to independence resembled a spider’s web rather than three independent pathways to freedom.

While traveling, they had to avoid organized networks of patrolmen who grabbed freedom-seekers and held them hostage for ransom money.

Known as the “President of the Underground Railroad,” Coffin is credited for bringing slavery to Indiana in 1826.

In his memoir, Reminiscences, Coffin tells the story of two girls who escaped Tennessee and sought refuge with their grandparents in the Indiana county of Randolph.

They were not, however, destined to live in safety.

When the alarm went off, it attracted the majority of the settlement’s black people together in a single location.

Unknown to them, an uncle of the two girls rode up on his horse at the same time the enslaver was being held at bay by the grandmother’scorn knife.

He went through it again and again, looking for weaknesses in the writing.

Inside the home, the two females were hatching a strategy to get out of their situation.

When the would-be kidnappers were given permission to enter the residence, they were extremely perplexed when they discovered that the girls were no longer there.

“We held the girls for a few weeks before sending them on to Canada, where they would be secure,” he says.

Eliza Harris, a Kentucky woman who was enslaved at the time, overheard her enslaver indicate he intended to sell one of her children for money in the winter of 1830.

She managed to get away and make her way to the Ohio River.

Eliza Harris leaped onto a block of ice floating in the river as she heard her enslaver’s horse approaching.

A retelling of Harris’ courageous escape was included in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s abolitionist novelUncle Tom’s Cabin.

Many Americans were moved to sympathize with enslaved people and abolitionists after reading Uncle Tom’s Cabin, which went on to become one of the most important novels in history.

They then apparently stopped in the adjacent town of Pennville, Indiana, before continuing their northward journey.

Catherine’s hand was grabbed by the woman, who cried, “How are you doing today, Aunt Katie? God’s blessings on you!” It was Eliza Harris, who had safely migrated to Chatham, Ontario, Canada, when the call came through.

Eliza’s Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diary

When enslaved African Americans attempted to gain their freedom in the 30 years preceding the American Civil War, they turned to the Underground Railroad for assistance (1861-1865). Slavery-supporting states in the South were served by a network of “railroads” that connected them to “free” states in the North and Canada. Sometimes abolitionists, people who were opposed to slavery, organized paths for the Underground Railroad. In most cases, the network consisted of a succession of tiny, individual activities to assist enslaved persons who were deemed fugitives.

  1. Indiana, whose citizens are referred to as Hoosiers, was one of the free states.
  2. Enslaved people were captured and returned to the South by some who resided across the river from Kentucky, which was a slave state.
  3. Taking Care of Business on the Underground Railroad.
  4. While some people did have secret chambers in their homes or carriages, the great bulk of the Underground Railroad consisted of people surreptitiously assisting those who were fleeing slavery in whatever way they were able to do so.
  5. “Conductors” were those who escorted enslaved persons to safety and freedom.
  6. With each change in ownership of the house, additional or fewer stations were added to the Underground Railroad network.
  7. It was done in a discreet manner, by word of mouth, that the stations were being established.

Escapees from bondage would be thrown back into servitude if they were apprehended.

Slavery was backed by both states that supported slavery and free states, and this extended to both groups.

Some reports claim that it was used by failed Pennsylvania patrolmen who attempted to capture freedom-seekers but were unsuccessful.

He said that he collaborated with others to flee to the North, where “the railroad went underground all the way to Boston,” after being tortured by his captors.

Eventually, Davids managed to get away from his Kentucky enslaver and make it to the Ohio River in time.

When Davids realized he was about to be captured, he swam over the river to the other side and slid out of sight.

To put it another way, the term “Underground Railroad” had become widely used by the mid-1840s.

Slavery was prohibited north of the Ohio River under Article 6 of the Northwest Ordinance, but the prohibition did not apply to enslaved persons who had already established themselves in the area north of the Ohio.

Throughout the Northwest Territory, slavery was a common part of everyday life.

Indiana officially became a territory in 1800, with future President of the United States William Henry Harrison serving as the area’s first territorial administrator.

Indiana’s population, Harrison and his followers believed, would increase as a result of permitting slavery to exist.

The petition was refused by Congress.

In some cases, the “contract holder” may be able to dictate how long a person must be held captive.

See also:  What Did You Learn About The Underground Railroad? (Question)

As soon as Indiana became a state in 1816, its stateConstitutioncontained wording that was identical to Article 6 of the Northwest Ordinance—new enslaved persons were not permitted, but those who were already slaves were allowed to continue as such.

Until the 1820 census, there were Hoosiers who were still considered “slaves.” African-Americans were obliged to register with the county and post a bond saying that they would not cause problems beginning in 1831, according to the state legislature.

According to Indiana’s 1851 Constitution, black people were not permitted to vote or serve in the military, nor were they permitted to testify in any trial in which a white person was involved.

In the end, all three routes led to Michigan and ultimately to Canada.

With several stops in between, the routes in Indiana ran from Posey to South Bend, from Corydon and Porter, and from Madison and DeKalb County, among other places.

“Prominent farmers.

After a local court found one farmer guilty of assisting enslaved persons, the Supreme Court reversed the decision.

Those who had managed to flee slavery had to negotiate an unknown area, either east or turning back south before proceeding north.

Levi Coffin of Newport, Indiana, was the most well-known Underground Railroad “station master” in the state (now called Fountain City).

The couple claimed to have hosted about 2,000 individuals over the course of two decades, spreading bedrolls on their kitchen floor to accommodate as many people as they could fit in.

“After a long and risky journey, the girls settled in to enjoy their newly obtained independence while praying that their master would never find out where they were.

Despite the fact that their master had arrived in Richmond, ostensibly to look around the area and buy cattle, he was really looking for any sign of his slave property.” They were awoken by the enslaver and a group of men from Richmond and Winchester.

Around the grandparents’ hut, more than 200 people gathered to encircle and protect them from harm.

Levi expresses himself thusly: “A police officer obliged his request and handed him the writ in hand.

According to him, the letter did not grant them any authorization to enter the residence and look for valuables.” The uncle remained at the doorway as long as he could to continue the dispute with the enslaver.

According to the account, the girls were disguised as guys and sneaked past the throng to a location where two horses waiting for them.

To Coffin’s residence, the girls were able to make it without incident.

One of Eliza Harris’ children was sold for money in the winter of 1830, according to her enslaver, who she overheard that he was planning to sell another of her children for money.

Eventually, she managed to get free and flee to the Ohio River.

Eliza Harris leaped onto a slab of ice floating in the river as she heard the sound of her enslaver’s horse approaching.

It was in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, a book by Harriet Beecher Stowe, that Harris’ heroic escape was recounted.

It went on to become one of the most important novels in history, inspiring many Americans to sympathize with enslaved people and abolitionists as a result of reading it.

They then reportedly spent some time in the nearby town of Pennville, Indiana, before continuing their journey northwards.

Catherine’s hand was grabbed by the lady, who yelled, “I’m going to kill you!” “Aunt Katie, how are you doing? Please accept my best wishes!” It was Eliza Harris, who had successfully migrated to Chatham, Ontario, Canada, from her previous residence in the United Kingdom.

16 Children’s Books About the Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad was the network that enslaved African Americans utilized to gain their freedom in the 30 years leading up to the American Civil War (Civil War) (1861-1865). The “railroad” used a variety of routes to transport slaves from slave-supporting states in the South to “free” states in the North and Canada. Routes of the Underground Railroad were occasionally established by abolitionists, or persons who were opposed to slavery. Most of the time, the network consisted of a succession of tiny, individual activities to assist enslaved persons who were deemed fugitives.

  • Indiana was one of the free states, and its citizens are referred to as Hoosiers.
  • Enslaved persons were captured and returned to the South by others who resided across the river from Kentucky, which was a slave state.
  • Taking Care of the Underground Railroad To the disbelief of many, the Underground Railroad was not a network of underground tunnels.
  • Using railroad lingo, individuals who traveled south to locate persons who had been enslaved and were seeking freedom were referred to as “pilots.” “Conductors” were those who escorted enslaved persons to safety and freedom.
  • Stations on the Underground Railroad were added or deleted when the ownership of the property changed.
  • Stations were established in a stealthy manner, by word of mouth.
  • Those who attempt to flee bondage risk being apprehended and forced to back to servitude.

This extended to both persons who lived in slave-supporting states and those who lived in free-states.

According to one account, it was used by failed Pennsylvania patrolmen who attempted to grab freedom-seekers.

He said that he collaborated with others to flee to the North, where “the railroad went underground all the way to Boston” after being tortured.

Davids escaped from his Kentucky enslaver and made his way to the Ohio River.

Davids, desperate and on the verge of being apprehended, swam the river, made it to the other side, and slid out of sight.

When the nascent United States government formed the Northwest Territory in 1787, it included the region that would eventually become Indiana.

People who were enslaved in 1787 were allowed to stay enslaved, but no new enslaved persons were permitted.

Evidence of slavery has been found in Vincennes and Floyd County in the south, as well as as far north as La Porte.

Slavery was favored by Harrison, who believed it would be beneficial for the economy’s growth.

In 1802, Indiana’s lawmakers and business leaders petitioned Congress for a ten-year period to repeal the state constitution.

In 1805, the Indiana Territory House of Representatives established a new legislation permitting anyone to maintain enslaved people who had been bought in the United States.

The offspring of the enslaved individual were also deemed to be property.

As a result, by 1816, Indiana was a free state, but it was not a welcoming environment for black people.

(This was not required of white folks.) Indiana’s 1851 Constitution prohibited black people from voting, serving in the military, or testifying in any trial in which a white person was accused of a crime.

In the end, all three pathways went to Michigan and ultimately to Canada.

Lewis Harding said in a 1915 history of Decatur County, Indiana, that the county was a spot where three roads came together after crossing the Ohio River at separate points along the way.

assisted the escaped slaves in any way possible.” After a local court found one farmer guilty of assisting enslaved persons, the Supreme Court reversed the conviction.

They had to cross an unknown terrain, either east or turning back south before continuing north.

Levi Coffin of Newport was the most well-known Underground Railroad “station master” in Indiana (now called Fountain City).

The couple claimed to have hosted about 2,000 individuals over the course of 20 years, spreading bedrolls on their kitchen floor to accommodate as many people as they could.

“After a long and risky voyage, the girls settled into their newfound freedom, trusting that their master would never find of their location.

Their lord had traveled to Richmond, purportedly to look about the area and buy livestock, but in reality he had gone to track down the location of his slaves’ land.” They were roused by the enslaver and a party of men from Richmond and Winchester.

In total, approximately 200 people encircled and secured the grandparents’ cabin in record time.

Levi expresses himself thus: “He asked to view the writ, which was then delivered to him by the officer on duty.

There was no permission to enter the premises or search for items, he insisted.” The uncle continued the dispute with the enslaver as long as he was able to do so from the doorway.

They were allegedly disguised as youths and sneaked past the crowd to where two horses awaited them, according to the narrative.

The girls made it to Coffin’s residence without incident.

Eliza Harris’s Courageous Evasion Indiana is the scene of one of the most famous escapes from slavery in history, which took place in the state of Indiana.

Harris made the snap decision to flee to Canada with her kid in tow.

There were no bridges, and there was no means for a raft to get through the ice.

She made her way from one ice floe to another, clutching her baby, until she reached the other side.

Eliza is the name of the character who braves the chilly Ohio.

In order to heal, Harris and her child traveled to Levi Coffin’s Fountain City residence.

The Coffins were on a vacation to Canada in 1854 with their daughter when a woman approached Catherine and introduced herself.

Catherine’s hand was taken by the woman, who cried, “Aunt Katie, how are you doing today? God’s blessings upon you!” It was Eliza Harris, who had safely migrated to Chatham, Ontario, Canada, with her family.

16 Books About the Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad was the network that enslaved African Americans utilized to achieve their freedom in the 30 years leading up to the American Civil War (1861-1865). The “railroad” took a variety of routes from slave-supporting states in the South to “free” states in the North and Canada. Routes of the Underground Railroad were often arranged by abolitionists, those who were opposed to slavery. More often than not, the network consisted of a succession of tiny, individual activities to assist enslaved persons who were deemed fugitives.

  • Indiana, whose citizens are known as Hoosiers, was one of the free states.
  • Some people who resided across the river from Kentucky, which was a slave state, would catch enslaved individuals and return them to the South.
  • Managing the Underground Railroad Contrary to common misconception, the Underground Railroad was not a network of underground tunnels.
  • Using railroad terminology, individuals who traveled south in search of enslaved people seeking freedom were referred to as “pilots.” “Conductors” were those who directed enslaved persons to safety and liberation from their captors.
  • Stations were added or withdrawn from the Underground Railroad when the ownership of the home changed.
  • Stations were established in a stealthy manner, largely by word of mouth.
  • Escapees from bondage would be compelled to return to servitude if they were apprehended.

This extended to both persons who lived in states that supported slavery and those who lived in free states.

According to one account, it was used by failed Pennsylvania patrolmen who attempted to abduct freedom-seekers.

After being tortured, the guy said that he collaborated with others to flee to the North, where “the railroad went underground all the way to Boston.” A third version of the story attributes the name to an enslaved man called Tice Davids, who made the decision to pursue his freedom in 1831.

Unfortunately, there was no boat available for the crossing.

Davids’ enslaver returned to Kentucky without him, claiming that he had vanished on a “underground railroad.” In any event, by the mid-1840s, the name “Underground Railroad” had been widely accepted.

Slavery was prohibited north of the Ohio River under Article 6 of the Northwest Ordinance, but the prohibition did not extend to enslaved persons who had already established themselves in the region.

Slavery was a common feature of life in the Northwest Territory.

Indiana was established as a territory in 1800, with future United States PresidentWilliam Henry Harrison serving as its first territorial governor.

Harrison and his followers also believed that legalizing slavery would increase the population of Indiana.

The petition was denied by the Congress.

The “contract holder” has the authority to determine how long the individual must stay enslaved.

When Indiana became a state in 1816, its state Constitution featured wording that was comparable to Article 6 of the Northwest Ordinance: no new enslaved individuals were permitted, but those who were already slaves were allowed to stay so.

As late as the 1820 census, there were Hoosiers who were still classified as “slaves.” In 1831, the Louisiana Legislature passed legislation requiring blacks to register with the county and deposit a bond pledging that they would not cause problems.

Indiana’s Underground Railroad Originally, it was believed that there were three primary lines of the Underground Railroad in Indiana.

(Canada abolished slavery in 1833.) The routes in Indiana ran from Posey to South Bend, from Corydon to Porter, and from Madison to DeKalb County, with other stops in between.

As a result of the injunction, he adds, “prominent farmers.

“The sympathies of the majority of the inhabitants of the country were with the escaped slave and his rescuer,” Harding says.

Those who had fled slavery had to negotiate an unknown territory, either east or reversing back south before continuing north.

Levi Coffin of Newport, Indiana, was the best-known Underground Railroad “station master” in Indiana (now called Fountain City).

In his memoir, Reminiscences, Coffin tells the story of two girls who escaped Tennessee and sought refuge with their grandparents in Randolph County, Indiana.

However, they were not meant to live in safety.

In response, an alarm was raised, which gathered together the majority of the settlement’s black population.

See also:  How Did Southerners React To The Underground Railroad? (Question)

During the time when the enslaver was being kept at bay by the grandmother’scorn knife, an uncle of the two daughters showed up on his horse.

He went through it again and again, looking for holes in it.

Inside the home, the two females were devising a strategy for escaping.

When the would-be kidnappers were allowed to enter the residence, they were greatly perplexed since the girls were nowhere to be seen.

“We held the girls for a few weeks before sending them on to Canada and safety,” he says.

Eliza Harris, from Kentucky, overheard her enslaver indicate that he intended to sell one of her children for money in the winter of 1830.

She snuck away and made her way to the Ohio River.

Eliza Harris leaped onto a block of ice that was drifting in the river after hearing her enslaver’s horse approaching.

Harris’ courageous escape was chronicled in Harriet Beecher Stowe’s abolitionist classic Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

Uncle Tom’s Cabin went on to become one of the most important novels in history, inspiring many Americans to sympathize with enslaved people and abolitionists.

They then allegedly stopped in the adjacent town of Pennville, Indiana, before continuing their journey north.

The woman grabbed Catherine’s hand and said, “How are you doing, Aunt Katie? God’s blessings to you!” It was Eliza Harris, who had successfully migrated to Chatham, Ontario, Canada.

Follow the Drinking Gourdby Bernadine Connelly

This novel, which is inspired on the popular American folk song of the same name, tells the story of one family’s escape from slavery through the Underground Railroad system. A good example of how persons fleeing to freedom would follow natural clues like the stars in order to locate the north is illustrated in this book. I would suggest this book for children aged 5 and higher. This story is also available on DVD, with Morgan Freeman providing the narration.

Henry’s Freedom Boxby Ellen Levine

Beginning when he was taken away from his family at an early age and continuing into adulthood, when his wife and children are sold to another slave master, Henry has always dreamt of being free. When it comes to becoming free, Henry comes up with an innovative solution: he will mail himself to the North! His arduous voyage in a shipping container is ultimately worth it since he receives a prize. Based on a true story, I recommend that children between the ages of 4 and 8 read this book aloud.

Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quiltby Deborah Hopkinson

In the midst of her enslavement and sewn-up existence, a young lady named Clara dreams of achieving freedom, both for herself and for her family. Sometime later, she overhears two other slaves discussing something known as the Underground Railroad, and she understands that she may use her abilities as a seamstress to assist others in their journeys toward freedom. It is her dream to create a quilt from scraps of cloth, which can also serve as a map to help her find her way to freedom in the North, thanks to the Underground Railroad.

Unspoken: A Story from the Underground Railroadby Henry Cole

It is just the hauntingly beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period in this frightening picture book; there are no words. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision about her future. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor lurking in the shadows? Do you think she’ll go with the flow and follow her heart and compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

Barefoot: Escape on the Underground Railroadby Pamela Duncan Edwards

With no words, only eerily beautiful drawings depict the seriousness of the historical period depicted in this chilling picture book. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision that will affect her future. What happens when she notices an unexpected invader lurking in the shadows? Does she notify anyone? Either that, or she chooses to follow her heart and compassion. Even though this is a really emotional novel, smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is going on in the plot.

Almost to Freedomby Vaunda Micheaux Nelson

With no words, only eerily beautiful drawings depict the seriousness of the historical period depicted in this frightening picture book. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult choice. Is she able to raise the alarm and inform someone about this unexpected invader hidden in the shadows?

Alternatively, does she follow her heart and her sense of compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in comprehending what is occurring in the plot. I recommend that you show it to children aged 5 and higher.

The Birdmanby Troon Harrison

This frightening picture book contains no text, simply eerily beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor who is lurking in the shadows? Or does she go with her heart and her feeling of compassion? This is a really emotional novel, although smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

Blacksmith’s Songby Elizabeth Van Steenwyk

It is just the hauntingly beautiful drawings that convey the seriousness of the historical period in this frightening picture book; there are no words. When a little girl discovers a runaway slave hiding in her barn, she is forced to make a difficult decision about her future. Is she able to raise the alarm about this unexpected visitor lurking in the shadows? Do you think she’ll go with the flow and follow her heart and compassion? This is a really emotional novel, however smaller children may want assistance in understanding what is occurring in the plot.

Before She Was Harrietby Lesa Cline-Ransome

Harriet Tubman is a historical figure whose full tale is unknown to those who only know her as such. She was more than just a formerly enslaved person. She was a spy, a suffragette, a general, a nurse, and a lot more things than that. This beautiful picture book delves into the many roles she played and the many names she went by throughout her long and illustrious life. I recommend that readers between the ages of 6 and 12 read this unusual biography.

Chapter Books and Early Readers

As Emma pays a visit to the Anacostia Museum for African American History, she finds herself transported back in time and forced to go via the Underground Railroad to freedom. Will she be able to make it out of slavery without being apprehended by the authorities? This early reader is jam-packed with information, and it is ideal for children who are reading at or above the second grade level.

What Was the Underground Railroad?by Yona Zeldis McDonough

This is the second time that theWhoHQseries has published a fantastic non-fiction book about a vital issue. This book contains interesting facts, a plethora of illustrations, maps, and biographies of those who took part in the expedition. An insert with images from the historical period is included so that children may see how slavery affected actual individuals who lived real lives and establish the link between the two. This gripping chapter book is best suited for children ages 8 and older because of its complexity.

Eliza’s Freedom Road: An Underground Railroad Diaryby Jerdine Nolen

In the aftermath of Eliza’s mother’s sale to a new family, all Eliza has left to recall is her quilt and the stories she used to tell. When Eliza’s mistress becomes ill, she begins to hear rumors about her being sold, and she realizes that her time has come. The words of her mother and the farmhand Joe guide her down the Underground Railroad, and before long, she is being guided by a gentle woman named Harriet into slavery.

If your child is reading at or above the fourth grade level, this fictitious journal of a 12-year-old house slave in Virginia is a fantastic choice for them.

Dear Austin: Letters From the Underground Railroadby Elvira Woodruff

When Eliza’s mother is sold away to another family, all Eliza has to remember her by is her quilt and the stories she used to tell about her childhood. The illness of Eliza’s mistress leads to rumors of Eliza’s sale, and Eliza realizes she has reached the end of her road. The words of her mother and the farmhand Joe guide her through the Underground Railroad, and before long, she is being brought by a gentle woman named Harriet into hiding. If your child is reading at or above the fourth grade level, this fictitious journal of a 12-year-old house slave in Virginia is a perfect choice for you!

Stealing Freedomby Elisa Carbone

When Eliza’s mother is sold away to another family, all Eliza has to remember her by is her quilt and the stories she used to tell. When Eliza’s mistress grows ill, she begins to hear rumors about her being sold, and she realizes that the time has come for her. Harriet is a nice lady who guides her through the Underground Railroad, based on the tales of her mother and the farmhand Joe. This fictitious journal of a 12-year-old house slave in Virginia is an excellent choice for children who are reading at or above the fourth grade level.

Bradyby Jean Fritz

Even though Brady is well-known for having a loud mouth, he’s never had to keep a secret quite like this before — the secret of an Underground Railroad stop close to his family’s house. Brady is presented with a difficult decision: should he reveal what he knows, or should he assist and protect slaves who are attempting to flee for their lives? This book is best suited for children who are reading at or above the third grade level.

If you enjoyed this list, you’ll love our newsletter! Sign up below:

Rachel Janney’s private collection of photographs of Eliza Janney Rawson was shared with us. ” data-image-caption=”” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” src=” alt=”” data-image-caption=”” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” width=”567″ and height=”936″ are the dimensions of this page. srcset=srcset=srcset “The following values: h=936 567w,h=150 91w, h=300 182w, h=663w Sizes are as follows: (max-width: 567px) 100vw, 567px “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized A photograph of Eliza Finch Coffin Janney Rawson (1830-1907) from a private collection is presented here.

  • In addition to women’s suffrage and prison reform, she committed her life to civil rights activities in Black education and civil rights, as well as women’s suffrage and jail reform.
  • He was the eldest son of the school’s founders, Samuel M.
  • John died in the early months of 1858 from a persistent ailment, likely TB, that had been plaguing him for years.
  • Eliza was now the only provider for her two small children, Samuel and Clarissa, who were born only a few months after John’s death.
  • The Goose Creek Meeting registration of births, marriages, and deaths, which includes information on Samuel M.
  • Eliza remained close to her in-laws, Samuel and Elizabeth Janney, and she remained in Lincoln to assist with the management of the JanneySon shop, which she founded.
  • Eliza had been seeing Edward since 1876.

The following is a biographical biography of Eliza Coffin Janney taken from the Goose Creek Meeting chapter in the book of Hinshaw’s Quaker History.

Janney, who had been her husband’s father-in-law.

The Friends’ Intelligencer was a weekly publication that was issued in Philadelphia.

Eliza mentions Oscar Carey, a freedman who worked as a hired employee for the Janney household at the end of the essay, which is reproduced here.

The Janneys were involved in the Underground Railroad, which is mentioned in the article as well.

This essay written by Eliza Janney Rawson for the Friends Intelligencer on May 27, 1899, on the life of her former father-in-law Samuel M.

This section of the essay also introduces Oscar Carey, a character that requires further investigation.

While this article is still mostly about Samuel M.

Caption=”1899″ data-image-caption=” Lucretia Mott, Nelson Talbot Gant, and a particular group of Confederate troops she served in the Janneystore who were there for more than just a purchase of caps:civil war narrative Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Janney work at the janney shop, where rebel fighters can be found.” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” src=” alt=” data-large-file=” src=” data-medium-file=” The following are the dimensions: width: 677; height: 978;” srcset=” 677w, 104w, 207w, 768w” sizes=”(max-width: 677px) 100vw, 677px”> srcset=” 677w, 104w, 207w, 768w” sizes=”(max-width: 677px) 100vw, 677px”> Eliza had played a pivotal role in the establishment of a school for African American children following the war’s conclusion in 1865.

A few short phrases in a Lincoln School centennial history booklet refer to the school as ‘a notable colored school,’ according to the brochure.

Cornelia Janney, the daughter of Elizabeth and Samuel M.

This woman’s eventful and self-less life is only partially summarized in an obituary published for the Friends Intelligencer on August 24, 1907: The Friends Intelligencer published an obituary for Eliza Janney Rawson on August 24, 1907.

Eliza Rawson looks to be all we expect her to be: powerful and confident, with her gaze fixed straight on the viewer’s face.

Woman on horseback in a Civil War illustration by Alfred Waud “data-image-caption=”alfred waud civil war illustration woman on horseback” data-image-caption=”alfred waud civil war illustration woman on horseback” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” src=” alt=”woman on horseback (1)” data-large-file=” src=” alt=”woman on horseback (1)” “Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, “Woman on Horseback” by Alfred Waud

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *