Who Is The Father Of The Underground Railroad? (TOP 5 Tips)

William Still (1821-1902), known as “the Father of the Underground Railroad,” assisted nearly 1,000 freedom seekers as they fled enslavement along the eastern branch of the Underground Railroad. Inspired by his own family’s story, he kept detailed, written records about the people who passed through the PASS offices.

Why is William still the father of the Underground Railroad?

William Still was an abolitionist and conductor on the Underground Rail Road for 18 years. During this time he raised funds, provided shelter, and facilitated the resettlement of escaped slaves in the North. He got his start in 1847 at the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery as a clerk.

Who was William Still’s brother?

As an abolitionist movement leader, William Still assisted hundreds of enslaved Africans to escape from slavery. After a forty year search, he located his brother, Peter Still, and helped him to escape to freedom.

What is William still known for?

Gideon demands Harriet be taken alive, but when Abraham angrily tries to shoot her, Gideon shoots him in the head. Harriet is able to get the drop on Gideon, shooting him in the hand.

What happened to Peter Stills family?

Peter and his eldest brother Levin Jr. were sold by their owner at ages eight and six respectively, shortly after their mother had fled for a second time. After many years in Kentucky, the brothers were eventually sold to various slave-owning families in Florence and Tuscumbia, Alabama.

How many people were still enslaved at the time of the Civil War?

Of the 4.4 million African Americans in the US before the war, almost four million of these people were held as slaves; meaning that for all African Americans living in the US in 1860, there was an 89 percent* chance that they lived in slavery.

Who did William still married?

William Still married Letitia George, a skilled dressmaker and they had four children. William Still found employment in the office of the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery. Caroline Virginia Still, daughter of Letitia and William Still, is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on November 1.

WILLIAM STILL – “FATHER OF THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD” — Black Bottom Archives

William Still was born on October 7, 1821, in Burlington County, New Jersey, and was a free Black man. He was known as the “Father of the Underground Railroad” because he assisted around 800 black men and women in their escape to freedom in the North. His parents, Levi and Charity Still, were both born into slavery in the Virginia colony of the same name. Levin purchased his freedom and relocated to the state of New Jersey in 1798. Charity and her four children were able to flee servitude, but they were all apprehended and brought back to slavery.

THE FATHER OF THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD

For 18 years, William Still worked as an anti-abolitionist conductor on the New York City Underground Rail Road. His activities at this period included raising cash, providing sanctuary for escaped slaves, and facilitating their resettlement in the northern United States. A clerk of the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery, he began his start in the abolitionist movement in 1847. Following the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 by Congress, the Society nominated him as head of its Vigilance Committee, which was entrusted with assisting fugitive and liberated slaves who arrived in the city of Philadelphia in 1850.

By way of example, William felt inspired to begin documenting these experiences after going through a personal encounter.

Following Peter’s account of his mother’s two escapes from slavery, William came to the realization that Peter was one of the boys that his mother had abandoned in the first place.

William kept these recordings hidden until long after the Civil War ended, realizing the risk that this material posed to fugitive slaves, potential runaways, abolitionists, and freeBlack men and women of all races and backgrounds.

His book is the only first-person narrative of the Underground Railroad written and self-published by a Black American, and it is also the most widely distributed.

William Still’s National Significance · William Still: An African-American Abolitionist

Who is William Still, and what is his background? During the antebellum period in American history, William Still, a free-born Black man, rose to prominence as a leader of the abolitionist movement and as a writer. He was also one of the most successful Black businessmen in the history of the city of Philadelphia, and he was born in the city of Philadelphia. He was the youngest of eighteen children born to Levin and Charity Still on October 7, 1821, in Burlington County, New Jersey, and was the youngest of their eighteen children.

  • His father purchased his freedom, and his mother was able to flee slavery in Maryland with the help of a relative.
  • The virtues of family and effort that his parents instilled in him, together with pride and self-determination, have served him well throughout his life.
  • After completing his apprenticeship that year, he was employed to work as a clerk at The Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery.
  • The enactment of the Escaped Slave Act of 1850 resulted in Still’s appointment as head of the society’s resurrected Vigilance Committee, which assisted and supported fugitive Africans.
  • He had no formal education at the time, but he read all he could get his hands on and studied grammar.
  • He was given the authority to chronicle African resistance to slavery, as well as to write letters to his family and friends and handle commercial affairs.
  • Still submitted a letter to the newspaper in 1859, expressing his displeasure with the racial prejudice that African Americans were subjected to aboard Philadelphia streetcars.

In his self-published book The Underground Railroad (1872), William Still chronicled the tales of Africans who had been slaves but had earned their freedom via the use of the Underground Railroad.

He engaged literary agents to help him market the book.

He died in 1876.

In 1874, he authored An Address on Voting and Laboring, in which he defended his support for the reform candidate for mayor of Philadelphia, as opposed to the Republican candidate for mayor of the city.

After a forty-year quest, he was able to track down his brother, Peter Still, and assist him in his escape to freedom.

Still, he shown great courage in aiding escaped Africans, even at the danger of his own life.

He was an outspoken supporter of universal suffrage.

As a result of his fame, he was assigned to the Philadelphia Board of Trade in 1861 and, in 1864, to the position of peddler for the food of black troops at Camp William Penn in Pennsylvania.

He also served as a member of the Freedmen’s Aid Commission and was instrumental in the establishment of one of the first YMCAs for black youth.

Justification for the importance of William Still’s collection on a national scale The William Still Papers, which span the years 1865 to 1899, are housed at the Charles L.

It is estimated that Still’s documents contain 140 letters referring to family concerns, as well as 14 images.

As a vital contributor to the success of the Underground Railroad activities in Philadelphia, William Still was an integral member of the city’s free Black population, which played an important role in the Underground Railroad.

Runaways were able to get to safety in the North because to his efforts with the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery’s Vigilance Committee.

His work The Underground Railroad is well-known around the world.

Since the passage of H.R.

Blockson Afro-American Collection to investigate William Still’s papers, which are housed in the Charles L.

This act permitted the establishment of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom program by the United States National Park Service, which was tasked with the identification of Underground Railroad locations and the popularization of the Underground Railroad movement.

The personal communication of William Still and his family members offers scholars with an insight into the personal lives of William Still and his relatives. For further information about William Still, please visit the following:

  • The Life and Times of William Still
  • William Still’s Contemporaries
  • The Life and Times of William Still Links to connected websites, including links to William Still’s books
  • Links to other relevant websites
  • Searching the Collections will allow you to see William Still’s family pictures, letters, and other primary source items relevant to his life.

Biography of William Still, Father of the Underground Railroad

He was a famous abolitionist and civil rights activist who developed the phrase “Underground Railroad” and, as one of Pennsylvania’s most important “conductors,” assisted hundreds of individuals in achieving freedom and resettling away from servitude. Still died on July 14, 1902, after a long illness. While still alive, Still worked not just to abolish slavery, but also to ensure that African Americans living in northern enclaves were given civil rights protection. In his famous text, “The Underground Rail Road,” Still describes his work with political prisoners and other freedom seekers.

Fast Facts: William Still

  • Abolitionist, civil rights crusader, and “Father of the Underground Railroad,” Frederick Douglass is well-known. Born on October 7, 1821, in the vicinity of Medford, New Jersey Levin and Charity (Sidney) Steel are the Steels’ parents. The date of his death was July 14, 1902 in Philadelphia. Schooling: Only a limited amount of formal education
  • Self-taught “The Underground Rail Road” is a work that has been published. Caroline Matilda Still, William Wilberforce Still, Robert George Still, and Frances Ellen Still are the children of William Wilberforce Still and Letitia George, who married in 1847.

Early Life

Still was born a free Black man near the town of Medford in Burlington County, New Jersey, the youngest of 18 children born to Levin and Sidney Steel. Still was raised as a free Black man in the community of Medford. While Still submitted the date of November 1819 in the 1900 census, he claimed to have been born on October 7,1821, according to his actual birth certificate. The son of persons who had been enslaved laborers on a potato and maize farm on the eastern shore of Maryland owned by Saunders Griffin, Still was born into slavery.

  • The first time she escaped, she carried her four oldest children with her as well as her.
  • When Sidney Steel fled for the second time, she carried two girls with her, but her boys were sold to enslavers in Mississippi.
  • Throughout his boyhood, William Still worked on his family’s farm and also sought employment as a woodcutter to supplement his family’s income.
  • He achieved this by reading a lot and taught himself how to do so.
See also:  When Did Harrient Tubman Lead People In The Underground Railroad? (Question)

Marriage and Family

With the age of 23, Still moved to Philadelphia and began working as a janitor for the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society, which later promoted him to the position of clerk in 1845. His involvement with the movement quickly progressed and by 1850 he was serving as the head of the committee set up to assist freedom seekers in their quest for independence. Still met and later married Letitia George while he was living in Philadelphia. Their marriage in 1847 resulted in the birth of four children: Caroline Matilda Still, who became one of the first African American women doctors in the United States; William Wilberforce Still, who became a prominent African American lawyer in Philadelphia; Robert George Still, who became a journalist and print shop owner; and Frances Ellen Still, who became an educator after the poet Frances Watkins Harper.

The Underground Railroad

Between 1844 and 1865, Still was instrumental in the emancipation of at least 60 enslaved Black people from their bonds. However, she continued to interview a large number of enslaved Black people who were seeking freedom – men, women, and families – and documented their origins, the difficulties they encountered and the assistance they received, their final destination, as well as the pseudonyms they used to relocate. In one of his interviews, Still discovered that he was interviewing his elder brother Peter, who had been sold to another enslaver after their mother managed to escape from their captors.

In 1850, after the passing of the Fugitive Slave Act, Still was chosen head of the Vigilance Committee, which was formed to discover a means to get around the law.

African American Civic Leader

Because his involvement with the Underground Railroad had to be a closely guarded secret, Still maintained a relatively low public profile until enslaved people were liberated. Still, he was a pretty famous leader in the Black community at the time of his death. In 1855, he journeyed to Canada to investigate enclaves of previously enslaved individuals who had escaped from the United States. Still published a letter in a local newspaper in 1859, which marked the beginning of his campaign to desegregate Philadelphia’s public transit system.

A brief narrative of the struggle for the rights of the colored people of Philadelphia in the City Railway Cars” was written by Still in 1867 as a result of this experience.

After eight years of lobbying, the Pennsylvania legislature approved a measure abolishing segregation of public transportation.

In addition, he assisted in the establishment of a Mission School in North Philadelphia.

After 1865

Still published his collected interviews in a book named “The Underground Railroad” in 1872, seven years after the abolition of slavery. Still was the first person to do so. Over 1,000 interviews were conducted for the book, which totaled 800 pages. The stories are heroic and heartbreaking, and they highlight how individuals suffered greatly and gave much to free themselves from servitude in many parts of the world. Most notably, the book emphasized the fact that African Americans were principally responsible for organizing and maintaining the abolitionist movement in Philadelphia during its early years.

Still expressed his appreciation for his book by saying, “We need need works on many issues from the pens of African men to represent the race intellectually.” After its publication, “The Underground Rail Road” became a vital addition to the collection of literature written by African Americans detailing their past as abolitionists and previously enslaved people, which was already extensive.

After the book was published, Still displayed it at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in order to remind tourists of the heritage of enslavement in the United States of America.

By the late 1870s, he was reported to have sold 5,000-10,000 copies of his book. In 1883, he published the third and extended version, which featured an autobiographical sketch as well as new material.

Businessman

In the course of his activism as an abolitionist and civil rights campaigner, Still accumulated a substantial amount of personal riches. When he was a young guy, he began investing in real estate in Philadelphia. Later on, he managed a coal company and opened a store where he sold new and used stoves to customers. In addition, he got royalties from the selling of his book. Still developed a network of efficient, enterprising, college-educated sales agents to help him advertise his book, which he defined as a compilation of “quiet instances of what fortitude may achieve when freedom is the aim.” Still’s book was published in 1989.

Death

Still died in 1902 as a result of cardiac problems. As described in Still’s obituary in The New York Times, he was “one of the most well-educated members of his race, and he was widely revered as ‘the Founder of the Underground Railroad.'”

Sources

  • “William Still and the Underground Railroad,” by Larry Gara, is available online. Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies28.1 (1961): 33–44
  • Stephen G. Hall, “To Render the Private Public: William Still and the Selling of ‘The Underground Rail Road’.” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies28.1 (1961): 33–44. Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography127.1 (2003): 35–55
  • Hendrick, Willene and George Hendrick
  • Hendrick, Willene and George Hendrick “Fleeing for Freedom: Stories of the Underground Railroad as Told by Levi Coffin and William Still” is a collection of stories about the Underground Railroad. Ivan R. Dee and Lurey Khan published a book in Chicago in 2004. “William Still and the Underground Railroad: Fugitive Slaves and Family Ties” is a book about fugitive slaves and their families. Mitchell, Frances Waters
  • New York: iUniverse, 2010
  • Mitchell, Frances Waters. Still, William. “The Underground Rail Road Records: With a Life of the Author.” Negro History Bulletin5.3 (1941): 50–51
  • Still, William. “The Underground Rail Road Records: With a Life of the Author.” Philadelphia: William Still, 1886
  • William Still: An African-American Abolitionist (William Still: An African-American Abolitionist). The Still Family Archives are still in existence. Temple University is located in Philadelphia.

How Harriet Tubman and William Still Helped the Underground Railroad

“William Still and the Underground Railroad,” by Larry Gara, is a historical novel. Hall, Stephen G., “To Render the Private Public: William Still and the Selling of ‘The Underground Rail Road’,” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies 28.1 (1961): 33–44; “To Render the Private Public: William Still and the Selling of ‘The Underground Rail Road’,” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies 28.1 (1961): 33–44. Hendrick, Willene, and George Hendrick, in The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography127.1 (2003): 35–55.

Ivan R.

Mitchell, Frances Waters (ed.

Negro History Bulletin5.3 (1941): 50–51; Still, William, “The Underground Rail Road Records: With a Life of the Author,” Negro History Bulletin5.3 (1941): 50–51; Still, William, “The Underground Rail Road Records: With a Life of the Author,” William Still: An African-American Abolitionist (Philadelphia: William Still, 1886).

Templar University in Philadelphia

Harriet Tubman escaped slavery and guided others to freedom

Tubman, who was born into slavery in Maryland under the name Araminta Harriet Ross, was able to escape to freedom via the use of the Underground Railroad. Throughout her childhood, she was subjected to constant physical assault and torture as a result of her enslavement. In one of the most serious instances, she was struck in the head with an object weighing two pounds, resulting in her suffering from seizures and narcoleptic episodes for the rest of her life. John Tubman was a free black man when she married him in 1844, but nothing is known about their connection other than the fact that she adopted his last name.

  1. Even though she began the voyage with her brothers, she eventually completed the 90-mile journey on her own in 1849.
  2. As a result, she crossed the border again in 1850, this time to accompany her niece’s family to Pennsylvania.
  3. Instead, she was in charge of a gang of fugitive bond agents.
  4. Her parents and siblings were among those she was able to save.
  5. Tubman, on the other hand, found a way around the law and directed her Underground Railroad to Canada, where slavery was illegal (there is evidence that one of her destinations on an 1851 voyage was at the house of abolitionist Frederick Douglass).
  6. “”I was a conductor on the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say things that other conductors are unable to express,” she stated with a sense of accomplishment.

“I never had a problem with my train going off the tracks or losing a passenger.” Continue reading Harriet Tubman: A Timeline of Her Life, Underground Railroad Service, and Activism for more information.

William Still helped more than 800 enslaved people escape

Meanwhile, William Still was born in Burlington County, New Jersey, a free state, into a life of liberty and opportunity. The purchase of his freedom by his father, Levi Steel, occurred while his mother, Sidney, was on the run from slavery. He had just turned eighteen and was helping an acquaintance who was being pursued by slave hunters. After arriving to Philadelphia in 1844, he went to work for the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery, first as a janitor and then as an administrative assistant.

His Underground Railroad “station” became a famous stopping point as he assisted in the emancipation of people oppressed and transported them to Canada.

Tubman made regular stops at Still’s station

Tubman was a frequent visitor at Still’s station, since she made a regular stop in Philadelphia on her way to New York. He is also said to have contributed monetarily to several of Tubman’s journeys. Her visits clearly left an effect on him, as evidenced by the inclusion of a section about her in his book, which followed a letter from Thomas Garrett about her ushering in arriving visitors. As Stillwright put it in his book, “Harriet Tubman had become their “Moses,” but not in the same way that Andrew Johnson had been their “Moses of the brown people.” “She had obediently gone down into Egypt and, through her own heroics, had delivered these six bondmen to safety.

But in terms of courage, shrewdness, and selfless efforts to rescue her fellow-men, she was without peer.

“While great anxieties were entertained for her safety, she appeared to be completely free of personal dread,” he went on to say.

will portray William Still, in the upcoming film Harriet. The film will explore the life and spirit of Tubman, and the role that Still had in guiding so many people on the road to freedom.

William Still and His Freedom Stories: The Father of the Underground Railroad

Rethinking Schools is the source for this review. Don Tate is the author of the book. Prior to learning about William Still from a Black Americans dictionary, author and illustrator Don Tate had only heard of Harriet Tubman, who had served as a conductor on the Underground Railroad during the American Civil War. He wrote about William Still, who was also a historian, in order to ensure that future generations would not be restricted to a single hero or heroism. Still came from a family that had fled slavery, regrettably having to leave behind two children in the process.

  • One of the persons that came to Still’s office in Philadelphia to hear his story was his elder brother Peter, who was one of many who came to hear it.
  • Still’s meticulous documentation is still in use today by scholars.
  • William Still and the Freedom Stories that he told Don Tate contributed to this article.
  • Genres: African-American Pop Music Pages:46 Reading Levels: Grades 1-2, Grades 3-5, and Advanced Placement ISBN:9781682632772 Rethinking Schools is the source for this review.
  • Don Tate, author and artist of the Ezra Jack Keats Award-winning picture book history of William Still, renowned as the “Father of the Underground Railroad,” has created a magnificent picture book biography of William Still.
  • After escaping slavery, William Still’s parents were forced to leave behind two of their children, a tragedy that tormented the Still family for many years.
  • One day, a very familiar guy walked into William’s office, seeking information about his long-lost relatives.
  • Is it possible?
  • This enabled him to bring together other families and to amass an incredible collection of information, which included interactions with Harriet Tubman, Henry “Box” Brown, and William & Ellen Craft.

Young readers will be inspired by Tate’s dramatic words and artwork in this groundbreaking picture book biography of the Father of the Underground Railroad, which is the first of its kind.

William Still and His Freedom Stories: Father of the Underground Railroad

Don Tate is the author of this piece. Don Tate is an illustrator. Date of publication: November 1, 2020 Peachtree Publishing is the publisher. Award-winning author and artist Don Tate tells the extraordinary and little-known story of William Still, sometimes known as the “Father of the Underground Railroad,” and how he helped build the Underground Railroad. After escaping slavery, William Still’s parents were forced to leave behind two of their children, a tragedy that tormented the Still family for many years.

  • Then, one day, a very familiar guy walked into William’s office, looking for information about his long-lost relatives.
  • Is it possible?
  • This enabled him to bring together other families and to amass an incredible collection of information, which included interactions with Harriet Tubman, Henry “Box” Brown, and William & Ellen Craft.
  • In this first-ever picture book biography of the Father of the Underground Railroad, Tate’s stunning words and artwork will be sure to inspire children and adults alike.
See also:  Which Century Did The Underground Railroad Happen? (Suits you)

RESOURCES

The Activity Guide may be downloaded by clicking here (CCSS Annotated).

REVIEWS

Kirkus . “Tate’s sentences are frequently brief, highlighting Still’s work and determination; when they are occasionally longer, they pack a powerful impact. His paintings, like his paintings, generally take the form of vignettes that record events over time before lingering lovingly on the expressive features of his protagonists. The film brings much-deserved attention to the life of a man who dedicated his time and energy to documenting the lives of others.” **FIVE-STAR REVIEW** **************************************************************** School Library Journal is a publication dedicated to school libraries.

The narrative describes the persecution and dehumanization that occurred during slavery, but it is not explicit enough for the intended audience.

Featuring a crucial player in the abolitionist movement, this uplifting real story mixes truth with a wonderfully accessible narrative to tell the biography of abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass.

Tate portrays a guy who ought to be better known to the public in this clearly written and instructive picture-book biography.”

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William Still was a notable abolitionist and merchant in Philadelphia during the nineteenth century. He was the son of former slaves, and he was instrumental in the emancipation of more than 600 slaves. He was widely regarded as the founding father of the Underground Railroad. His paternal grandparents were Levin and Sidney, often known as Charity, who raised him. Both were enslaved in Maryland at one point in their lives. Levin, previously known as Steel, had won his own freedom and then changed his last name to Still in order to protect his new wife, who was a runaway slave who had fled to the United States.

  1. William Still was born in 1821 in the state of New Jersey.
  2. He learnt to read and write as a child, but he did not have a formal educational education.
  3. He started out as a clerk before rising to the position of abolitionist leader.
  4. Still was appointed by the Anti-Slavery Society as the chairman of the newly formed Vigilance Committee, which was established in the aftermath of the law’s passing.
  5. After finding that he had reunited with his long-lost brother, Peter (who had been unable to join his mother when she escaped), he was even more eager to record the names and whereabouts of everyone he had assisted in escaping.
  6. In his book, The Underground Rail Road: A Record of Facts, Authentic Narratives, c.
  7. The name “Underground Railroad” is attributed to Still, who is also credited with coining it (Rail Roadsince shortened to one word).
  8. His push to desegregate the city’s public transit system, in particular, saw him as one of the campaign’s driving forces.
  9. Additionally, he was in charge of the post exchange at Camp William Penn, where African-American men were trained during the Civil War.

His other accomplishments include the establishment of an orphanage for the offspring of African-American Civil War soldiers, the ownership of substantial quantities of real estate, including Liberty Hall for a period, membership on the Philadelphia Board of Trade, and co-founding the journal The Nation.

Caroline, William, Robert, and Frances were the youngest. Still died of natural causes in 1902, despite his efforts. According to his obituary in the New York Times, he was known as “the founder of the Underground Railroad.”

8 Key Contributors to the Underground Railroad

Isaac Hopper, an abolitionist, is shown in this image from the Kean Collection/Getty Images. As early as 1786, George Washington expressed dissatisfaction with a “organization of Quakers, founded for such reasons,” which had sought to free a neighbor’s slave. Quakers were instrumental in the establishment of the Underground Railroad. Slavery was opposed in especially in Philadelphia, where Isaac Hopper, a Quaker who converted to Christianity, created what has been described as “the first working cell of the abolitionist underground.” Hopper not only protected escaped slave hunters in his own house, but he also constructed a network of safe havens and recruited a web of spies in order to get insight into their plans.

Hopper, a friend of Joseph Bonaparte, the exiled brother of the former French emperor, went to New York City in 1829 and established himself as a successful businessman.

READ MORE: The Underground Railroad and Its Operation

2. John Brown

John Brown, an abolitionist, about 1846 GraphicaArtis/Getty Images courtesy of Similar to his father, John Brown actively participated in the Underground Railroad by hosting runaways at his home and warehouse and organizing an anti-slave catcher militia following the adoption of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850, which he inherited from his father. The next year, he joined several of his sons in the so-called “Bleeding Kansas” war, leading one attack that resulted in the deaths of five pro-slavery settlers in 1856.

Brown’s radicalization continued to grow, and his ultimate act occurred in October 1859, when he and 21 supporters seized the government arsenal in Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia), in an effort to incite a large-scale slave uprising.

3. Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, where she experienced repeated violent beatings, one of which involving a two-pound lead weight, which left her with seizures and migraines for the rest of her life. Tubman fled bondage in 1849, following the North Star on a 100-mile walk into Pennsylvania, fearing she would be sold and separated from her family. She died in the process. She went on to become the most well-known “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, participating in around 13 rescue missions back into Maryland and rescuing at least 70 enslaved individuals, including several of her siblings.

As a scout, spy, and healer for the Union Army, Tubman maintained her anti-slavery activities during the Civil War, and is believed to have been the first woman in the United States to lead troops into battle. Tubman died in 1865. When Harriet Tubman Led a Civil War Raid, You Should Pay Attention

4. Thomas Garrett

‘Thomas Garrett’ is a fictional character created by author Thomas Garrett. The New York Public Library is a public library in New York City. The Quaker “stationmaster” Thomas Garrett, who claimed to have assisted over 2,750 escaped slaves before the commencement of the Civil War, lived in Wilmington, Delaware, and Tubman frequently stopped there on her route up north. Garret not only gave his guests with a place to stay but also with money, clothing & food. He even personally led them to a more secure area on occasion, arm in arm.

Despite this, he persisted in his efforts.

He also stated that “if any of you know of any poor slave who needs assistance, please send him to me, as I now publicly pledge myself to double my diligence and never miss an opportunity to assist a slave to obtain freedom.”

5. William Still

William Still is a well-known author and poet. Photograph courtesy of the Hulton Archive/Getty Images Many runaways traveled from Wilmington, the final Underground Railroad station in the slave state of Delaware, to the office of William Still in adjacent Philadelphia, which was the last stop on their journey. The Vigilance Committee of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, which provided food and clothing, coordinated escapes, raised funds, and otherwise served as a one-stop social services shop for hundreds of fugitive slaves each year, was chaired by Still, who was a free-born African American.

Still ultimately produced a book in which he chronicled the personal histories of his guests, which offered valuable insight into the operation of the Underground Railroad as a whole.

His assistance to Osborne Anderson, the only African-American member of John Brown’s company to survive the Harpers Ferry raid, was another occasion when he was called upon.

6. Levi Coffin

Charles T. Webber’s painting The Underground Railroad depicts fleeing slaves Levi Coffin, his wife Catherine, and Hannah Haydock providing assistance to the group of fugitive slaves. Getty Images/Bettina Archive/Getty Images Levi Coffin, often known as the “president of the Underground Railroad,” is said to have been an abolitionist when he was seven years old after witnessing a column of chained slaves people being taken to an auction house. Following a humble beginning delivering food to fugitives holed up on his family’s North Carolina plantation, he rose through the ranks to become a successful trader and prolific “stationmaster,” first in Newport (now Fountain City), Indiana, and subsequently in Cincinnati, Kentucky.

See also:  What Does The Term Underground Railroad Mean? (Solved)

In addition to hosting anti-slavery lectures and abolitionist sewing club meetings, Coffin, like his fellow Quaker Thomas Garrett, stood steadfast when hauled before a court of law.

His writings state that “the dictates of humanity came in direct conflict with the law of the land,” and that “we rejected the law.”

7. Elijah Anderson

The Ohio River, which formed the border between slave and free states, was referred to as the River Jordan in abolitionist circles because it represented the border between slave and free states. Madison, Indiana, was an especially appealing crossing point for enslaved persons on the run, because to an Underground Railroad cell established there by blacksmith Elijah Anderson and several other members of the town’s Black middle class in the 1850s. With his fair skin, Anderson might have passed for a white slave owner on his repeated travels into Kentucky, where would purportedly pick up 20 to 30 enslaved persons at a time and whisk them away to freedom, sometimes accompanying them as far as the Coffins’ mansion in Newport.

An anti-slavery mob devastated Madison in 1846, almost drowning an agent of the Underground Railroad, prompting Anderson to flee upriver to Lawrenceburg, Indiana, where he eventually settled.

8. Thaddeus Stevens

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens is an American lawyer and senator. Bettmann Archive courtesy of Getty Images; Matthew Brady/Bettmann Archive Thaddeus Stevens, a representative from Pennsylvania, was outspoken in his opposition to slavery. The 14th and 15th amendments, which guaranteed African-American citizens equal protection under the law and the right to vote, respectively, were among his many accomplishments, and he also advocated for a radical reconstruction of the South, which included the redistribution of land from white plantation owners to former enslaved people.

Despite this, it wasn’t until 2002 that his Underground Railroad activities were brought to light, when archeologists uncovered a hidden hiding hole in the courtyard of his Lancaster house.

Seward, also served as Underground Railroad “stationmasters” during the era.

Home

After all, William Still was just a little lad when he assisted the first one in escaping. He had no idea what the man’s name was; all he knew was that he was being chased by slave hunters. However, in the years to come, there would be hundreds of thousands more. Still, they determined that their stories would never be forgotten by anybody. “The courage and tremendous struggle that many of our people were forced to suffer should be preserved in the minds of this and future generations,” says the author.

  • His journals describe the experiences of the huge slave migration known as the Underground Railroad, which he witnessed firsthand.
  • The Underground Railroad (also known as the The tragic narrative of William Still, one of the most significant yet mostly unrecognized people of the Underground Railroad, is told in The William Still Story (William Still Story).
  • The so-called free northern states were a legal haven for former slaves, and bounty hunters were able to lawfully capture them, but Canada, which was protected by the British, served as a haven for runaway slaves.
  • While still alive, Still was the director of a vast network of abolitionists, supporters, and safe homes that spanned from Philadelphia to what is now Southern Ontario.
  • The many escaped slaves that traveled through the Philadelphia “station” were meticulously recorded in the records that were still retained today.
  • Even today, his book offers some of the greatest information we have about the workings of the Underground Railroad, chronicling the freedom seekers who utilized it, including where they came from, how they managed to escape, and the families they left behind in the process of escaping.

The William Still Story: A Narrative of the Underground Railroad The show premiered on February 6, 2012. Check your local listings to find out when it will be broadcast on your local PBS channel.

Click on the play button below to watch a preview ofThe Underground Railroad: The William Still Story

According to Ezra Don Tate, author and illustrator of the Jack Keats Award-winning picture book history of William Still, renowned as the “Father of the Underground Railroad,” has created a wonderful picture book biography of William Still. A must-have for any collection of African history. “Brings much-deserved attention to the life of a man who dedicated his life to documenting the lives of others,” says the critic. “An fascinating picture book biography of a lesser-known hero,” says Kirkus Reviews in a STARRED REVIEW of the book.

  1. A STARRED REVIEW from the School Library Journal After escaping slavery, William Still’s parents were forced to leave behind two of their children, a tragedy that tormented the Still family for many years.
  2. One day, a very familiar guy walked into William’s office, seeking information about his long-lost relatives.
  3. Is it possible?
  4. This enabled him to bring together other families and to amass an incredible collection of information, which included interactions with Harriet Tubman, Henry “Box” Brown, and William & Ellen Craft.
  5. Young readers will be inspired by Tate’s dramatic words and artwork in this groundbreaking picture book biography of the Father of the Underground Railroad, which is the first of its kind.
  6. Chicago Public Library has received several awards.
  7. California Reading Association’s Nonfiction Children’s Book Award received a Silver Honor.
  8. National Education Association of Kansas’s Recommended Reading List for Intermediate Students Don Tate also has the following items available: Carter recites a poem from the newspaper.

William Still and His Freedom Stories: The Father of the Underground Railroad

In his Freedom Stories, William Still is known as “the Father of the Underground Railroad.” List price: $31.64School price: $31.64 Discount Price:$22.15Quantity:1 (25-99) discount price of $21.71 quantity (100-249) Discounted Price:$21.49Quantity Available: (250-499) Discounted Price:$21.26Quantity Available: (500) $ 20.82 is the discounted price. Annotation: The film depicts the life of black abolitionist William Still, the son of an escaped slave, who assisted his people via his work with the Philadelphia Anti-slavery Society and the Underground Railroad in the early nineteenth century.

Permanently bound from the publisher’s hardcover edition Copyright expiration date: 2020 Date of publication: c2020 Pages:40 Availability:Available ISBN:Publisher:1-561-45935-6 Perma-Bound:0-7804-8658-7 ISBN 13: Publisher: 978-1-561-45935-3 ISBN 14: Publisher: 978-1-561-45935-3 Perma-Bound:978-0-7804-8658-4 Dewey:921 26 x 29 cm are the dimensions.

  • Several years before William Still’s birth, his father purchased his freedom and relocated to New Jersey, with his mother following a short time later, leaving behind two other children.
  • The neighbors called on William when he was eight years old because of his prowess in navigating the woods and his ability to safely guide a fleeing slave to safety.
  • Following his chance encounter with an old brother seeking refuge, he was inspired to compile a database of other freedom seekers as well as stories of their escapes in the hope of assisting in the reunification of families.
  • Tate’s writing style is fascinating and easy to read and understand.
  • A timeline, an author’s note, and a bibliography are all included in the back matter.
  • When Sidney Still escaped slavery in Maryland and traveled to New Jersey to join her husband, Levin, and their two daughters, she left their two boys behind in Maryland.
  • Before detailing how young William had to mix study with chores and Northern bigotry, Tate’s concise and urgent story establishes these realities.

When Still finally met his older brother Peter during the latter’s escape, he was inspired to begin collecting identifying information and stories about the runaways he assisted, work that was instrumental in reuniting families who had become separated and that became known as a chronicle of âslavery’s nightmare.â Tate’s sentences are frequently short, underscoring Still’s effort and drive; when they occasionally lengthen, they land with a punch: âWith three dollars in his pocket, His paintings, like his paintings, generally take the form of vignettes that record events over time before lingering lovingly on the expressive features of his protagonists.

  • Obtains the attention that is due to the life of a man who spent his life to documenting the lives of other people.
  • William Still’s unexpected meeting with his long-lost brother impacted the trajectory of his life, as well as the lives of many other African Americans who were fighting for their freedom at the same time.
  • The family continued to grow until William was born in 1821, the youngest of 15 children.
  • At the age of 26, he secured a work as an office clerk at the Anti-Slavery Society in Philadelphia, and he eventually converted his house into a âstationâ on the infamous Underground Railroad.
  • Obtains the attention that is due to the life of a man who spent his life to documenting the lives of other people.
  • The total number of words is 1,991.
  • A must-have for any collection of African history.

Kirkus Reviews gave it a STARRED REVIEW.

Publishers Weekly gave it a STARRED REVIEW.

THE STARRED REVIEW IN THE SCHOOL LIBRARIE JOURNAL Although William Stills’ parents were able to escape slavery, they were forced to leave behind two of their children, a sorrow that has remained with the family.

One day, a very familiar guy walked into Williams’ office, looking for information about his long-lost relatives.

Is it possible?

This enabled him to bring together other families and to amass an incredible collection of information, which included interactions with Harriet Tubman, Henry Box Brown and William and Ellen Craft.

Young readers are sure to be inspired by Tates’ dramatic words and artwork in this first-ever picture book biography of the Father of the Underground Railroad, which is available now.

Chicago Public Library has received several awards.

Eureka!

The Best of Children’s Picture Books Reviewers at Kirkus have given their opinions on Award for Children’s Crown (Nominee) Affiliation with the National Christian School Association ‘Golden Kite’ is a term used to describe a kite that is golden in color (Finalist, Nonfiction Text for Younger Readers) The Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI) is an organization that promotes children’s literature.

The Kansas State Reading Circle is a group of people who like reading.

Don Tate also has the following items available: Carter Reads a Poem from the Newspaper*Prices are subject to change without notice and are given in United States dollars.

Perma-Bound bindings are backed by an unwavering guarantee (excludes textbook rebinding). Paperbacks are not guaranteed to be available. Please Keep in Mind: All sales of digital materials are final.

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