Who Was Best Known For The Role Of The Leader Of The Underground Railroad? (Correct answer)

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the best-known figure related to the underground railroad. She made by some accounts 19 or more rescue trips to the south and helped more than 300 people escape slavery. Her life and character are an outstanding example of selfless dedication to freedom and the abolition of slavery.

Who really ran the Underground Railroad?

  • The “railroad” itself, according to this legend, was composed of “a chain of stations leading from the Southern states to Canada,” as Wilbur H. Siebert put it in his massive pioneering (and often wildly romantic) study, The Underground Railroad (1898), or “a series of hundreds of interlocking ‘lines,’ ” that ran from Alabama or Mississippi,

Who were major leaders of the Underground Railroad?

8 Key Contributors to the Underground Railroad

  • Isaac Hopper. Abolitionist Isaac Hopper.
  • John Brown. Abolitionist John Brown, c.
  • Harriet Tubman.
  • Thomas Garrett.
  • William Still.
  • Levi Coffin.
  • Elijah Anderson.
  • Thaddeus Stevens.

Who is famously known for her work on the Underground Railroad?

Harriet Tubman is credited with conducting upward of 300 enslaved people along the Underground Railroad from the American South to Canada. She showed extraordinary courage, ingenuity, persistence, and iron discipline.

What is William still best known for?

Brown failed at several business ventures before declaring bankruptcy in 1842. Still, he was able to support the abolitionist cause by becoming a conductor on the Underground Railroad and by establishing the League of Gileadites, an organization established to help runaway slaves escape to Canada.

Who is the leader of the Underground Railroad?

Harriet Tubman (1822-1913), a renowned leader in the Underground Railroad movement, established the Home for the Aged in 1908. Born into slavery in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman gained her freedom in 1849 when she escaped to Philadelphia.

What was Thomas Garrett’s role in the Underground Railroad?

Quaker abolitionist Thomas Garrett, raised on a farm in Upper Darby, Delaware County, Pennsylvania, regularly hid runaway slaves and assisted as many as 3,000 fugitives in their escape.

Who founded the Underground Railroad?

In the early 1800s, Quaker abolitionist Isaac T. Hopper set up a network in Philadelphia that helped enslaved people on the run.

How did Southerners respond to the Underground Railroad?

Reaction in the South to the growing number of slaves who escaped ranged from anger to political retribution. Large rewards were offered for runaways, and many people eager to make money or avoid offending powerful slave owners turned in runaway slaves. The U.S. Government also got involved.

Who were the pilots of the Underground Railroad?

Using the terminology of the railroad, those who went south to find enslaved people seeking freedom were called “pilots.” Those who guided enslaved people to safety and freedom were “conductors.” The enslaved people were “passengers.” People’s homes or businesses, where fugitive passengers and conductors could safely

What was William Still’s role in the Underground Railroad?

He became an active agent on the Underground Railroad, assisting fugitive Africans who came to Philadelphia. With the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850, Still was appointed chairman of the society’s revived Vigilance Committee that aided and supported fugitive Africans.

Who was the father of the Underground Railroad?

William Still (1821-1902), known as “the Father of the Underground Railroad,” assisted nearly 1,000 freedom seekers as they fled enslavement along the eastern branch of the Underground Railroad. Inspired by his own family’s story, he kept detailed, written records about the people who passed through the PASS offices.

How many slaves did William still save?

Often called “The Father of the Underground Railroad”, William Still helped as many as 800 slaves escape to freedom.

8 Key Contributors to the Underground Railroad

A decade before the Civil War, the leading Southern periodical De Bow’s Reviewpublished a series titled Diseases and Peculiarities of the Negro Race—a much-needed study, the editors opined, because it had “direct and practical bearing” on 3 million people whose worth as property totaled approximately $2 billion at the time of the publication. When it comes to African Americans’ supposed laziness (“deficiency of red blood in the pulmonary and arterial systems”), love of dancing (“profuse distribution of nervous matter to the stomach, liver, and genital organs”), and extreme aversion to being whipped (“skin.

(“Fleeing slave,” he said, was an old Greek phrase for a fugitive slave).

“Treating one’s slaves lovingly but sternly,” he said, was the first option.

Despite the fact that only a few thousand individuals, at most, fled slavery each year—nearly all of them from states bordering the free North—their exodus was seen by many Southern whites as a portent of a greater disaster.

  • Was it a matter of time until the entire fabric came undone?
  • Rather, it was intentionally supported and helped by a well-organized network that was both huge and ominous in scale.
  • The term underground railroad brings to mind pictures of trapdoors, flickering torches, and dark passageways winding through the woods, much as it did for most of the population in the 1840s and 1850s.
  • At least until recently, researchers paid relatively little attention to the story, which is remarkable considering how prominent it is in the public consciousness.
  • The Underground Railroad was widely believed to be a statewide conspiracy with “conductors,” “agents,” and “depots,” but was it really a fiction of popular imagination concocted from a succession of isolated and unconnected escapes?
  • Depending on whose historians you trust, the answers will be different.

One historian (white) questioned surviving abolitionists (most of whom were also white) a decade after the Civil War and documented a “big and complicated network” of agents, 3,211 of whom he recognized by name, who he characterized as “a large and intricate network” (nearly all of them white).

  • Activist clergyman James W.
  • Pennington claimed in 1855 that he had escaped “without the help.
  • As a result of his work on Abraham Lincoln and slavery, Eric Foner, one of the nation’s most recognized practitioners of history (his earlier book on the subject was awarded a Pulitzer Prize), has joined an expanding number of researchers who are illuminating the night sky.
  • (Since the student, as he makes clear in his acknowledgments, chose to become a lawyer, no scholarly careers were jeopardized in the course of the publication of this book.) Readers will be surprised by the narrative told in Gateway to Freedom: The Secret History of the Underground Railroad.
  • Assisting runaways was nothing new for abolitionist organisations, who made a point of publicizing it in pamphlets, publications, and yearly reports.
  • Local newspapers published stories about Jermain W.

Bazaars with the slogan “Buy for the sake of the slave” offered donated luxury goods and handcrafted knickknacks just before the winter holidays, and bake sales in support of the Underground Railroad became common fund-raisers in Northern towns and cities, despite the fact that this may seem unlikely.

  • Many women were enthralled by these incidents, which transformed everyday, “feminine” tasks like baking, grocery shopping, and sewing into exhilarating acts of moral commitment and political rebellion for thousands of them.
  • While governor of New York, William Seward publicly sponsored Underground Railroad operations, and while serving as a senator in the United States Senate, he (not so openly) provided refuge to runaways in his basement.
  • When Northern states implemented “personal liberty” acts in the 1850s, they were able to exclude state and municipal authorities from federal fugitive-slave statutes, this act of defiance acquired legal recognition.
  • Yet another surprise in Foner’s gripping story is that it takes place in New York City.
  • Even as recently as the 1790s, enslaved laborers tended Brooklyn’s outlying fields, constituting a quarter of the city’s total population (40 percent).
  • Besides properly recapturing escapees, slave catchers prowled the streets of Manhattan, and they frequently illegally kidnapped free blacks—particularly children—in order to sell them into Southern bond slavery.
  • George Kirk snuck away on board a ship bound for New York in 1846, only to be apprehended by the captain and kept in chains while waiting to be returned to his master’s possession.
  • Following his triumphant exit from court, the winning fugitive was met with applause from the courtroom’s African-American contingent.
  • A second legal basis was discovered by the same court to free Kirk, who this time rolled out triumphantly in a carriage and arrived in the safety of Boston in no time.
  • In addition to being descended from prominent Puritans, Sydney Howard Gay married a wealthy (and radical) Quaker heiress, who became the editor of the National Anti-Slavery Standard.
  • Whilst Gay was busy publishing abolitionist manifestos and raising funds, Napoleon was patrolling the New York harbor in search of black stowaways and traveling the length and breadth of the Mason-Dixon Line in pursuit of those who had managed to escape slavery.

It’s “the most complete description in existence of how the underground railroad worked in New York City,” according to Foner, and it contains “a treasure trove of compelling anecdotes and a storehouse of insights about both slavery and the underground railroad.” One of the most moving passages was when Gay documented the slaves’ accounts of their reasons for fleeing in a matter-of-fact tone.

  • Cartwright’s theory, it appears that none of them addressed Drapetomania.
  • I was beaten with a hatchet and bled for three days after being struck with 400 lashes by an overseer.” As a result of his research, Foner concludes that the phrase “Underground Railroad” has been used to describe something that is restrictive, if not deceptive.
  • Though it had tunnels, it also had straightaways and bright straightaways where its traces might be found.
  • It is true that the Underground Railroad had conductors and stationmasters in a sense, but the great majority of its people contributed in ways that were far too diverse to be compared in such a straightforward manner.
  • Its passengers and their experiences were almost as different.
  • During this time, a Virginia mother and her little daughter had spent five months crouched in a small hiding hole beneath a house near Norfolk before being transported out of the country.
  • Although the Underground Railroad operated on a small scale, its effect considerably beyond the size of its activities.

It fostered the suspicions of Southern leaders while driving Northern leaders to choose sides with either the slaves or the slavecatchers.

Escapees were reported to be flooding northward at an unusual rate just a few days after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter in April 1861.

There had been a Drapetomania on a magnitude that was worse beyond Dr.

The Reverend Samuel Cartwright passed away in 1863, just a few months after the Emancipation Proclamation, which officially established Drapetomania as a national policy.

As he put it, the Underground Railroad “has hardly no business at all these days.

New Yorkers may have been astonished to open their eyes in the early 1864 season as well.

The accompanying piece, on the other hand, soon put their concerns to rest. According to the plan, Manhattan’s first subway line would travel northward up Broadway from the Battery to Central Park, beginning at 42nd Street.

2. John Brown

John Brown, an abolitionist, about 1846 GraphicaArtis/Getty Images courtesy of Similar to his father, John Brown actively participated in the Underground Railroad by hosting runaways at his home and warehouse and organizing an anti-slave catcher militia following the adoption of the Fugitive Slave Act in 1850, which he inherited from his father. The next year, he joined several of his sons in the so-called “Bleeding Kansas” war, leading one attack that resulted in the deaths of five pro-slavery settlers in 1856.

Brown’s radicalization continued to grow, and his ultimate act occurred in October 1859, when he and 21 supporters seized the government arsenal in Harpers Ferry, Virginia (now West Virginia), in an effort to incite a large-scale slave uprising.

3. Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was born into slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, where she experienced repeated violent beatings, one of which involving a two-pound lead weight, which left her with seizures and migraines for the rest of her life. Tubman fled bondage in 1849, following the North Star on a 100-mile walk into Pennsylvania, fearing she would be sold and separated from her family. She died in the process. She went on to become the most well-known “conductor” on the Underground Railroad, participating in around 13 rescue missions back into Maryland and rescuing at least 70 enslaved individuals, including several of her siblings.

As a scout, spy, and healer for the Union Army, Tubman maintained her anti-slavery activities during the Civil War, and is believed to have been the first woman in the United States to lead troops into battle.

When Harriet Tubman Led a Civil War Raid, You Should Pay Attention

4. Thomas Garrett

‘Thomas Garrett’ is a fictional character created by author Thomas Garrett. The New York Public Library is a public library in New York City. The Quaker “stationmaster” Thomas Garrett, who claimed to have assisted over 2,750 escaped slaves before the commencement of the Civil War, lived in Wilmington, Delaware, and Tubman frequently stopped there on her route up north. Garret not only gave his guests with a place to stay but also with money, clothing & food. He even personally led them to a more secure area on occasion, arm in arm.

Despite this, he persisted in his efforts.

He also stated that “if any of you know of any poor slave who needs assistance, please send him to me, as I now publicly pledge myself to double my diligence and never miss an opportunity to assist a slave to obtain freedom.”

5. William Still

William Still is a well-known author and poet. Photograph courtesy of the Hulton Archive/Getty Images Many runaways traveled from Wilmington, the final Underground Railroad station in the slave state of Delaware, to the office of William Still in adjacent Philadelphia, which was the last stop on their journey. The Vigilance Committee of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society, which provided food and clothing, coordinated escapes, raised funds, and otherwise served as a one-stop social services shop for hundreds of fugitive slaves each year, was chaired by Still, who was a free-born African American.

Still ultimately produced a book in which he chronicled the personal histories of his guests, which offered valuable insight into the operation of the Underground Railroad as a whole.

His assistance to Osborne Anderson, the only African-American member of John Brown’s company to survive the Harpers Ferry raid, was another occasion when he was called upon.

6. Levi Coffin

Charles T. Webber’s painting The Underground Railroad depicts fleeing slaves Levi Coffin, his wife Catherine, and Hannah Haydock providing assistance to the group of fugitive slaves. Getty Images/Bettina Archive/Getty Images Levi Coffin, often known as the “president of the Underground Railroad,” is said to have been an abolitionist when he was seven years old after witnessing a column of chained slaves people being taken to an auction house. Following a humble beginning delivering food to fugitives holed up on his family’s North Carolina plantation, he rose through the ranks to become a successful trader and prolific “stationmaster,” first in Newport (now Fountain City), Indiana, and subsequently in Cincinnati, Kentucky.

See also:  What Were The Main Underground Railroad Routes? (Suits you)

In addition to hosting anti-slavery lectures and abolitionist sewing club meetings, Coffin, like his fellow Quaker Thomas Garrett, stood steadfast when hauled before a court of law.

7. Elijah Anderson

The Ohio River, which formed the border between slave and free states, was referred to as the River Jordan in abolitionist circles because it represented the border between slave and free states. Madison, Indiana, was an especially appealing crossing point for enslaved persons on the run, because to an Underground Railroad cell established there by blacksmith Elijah Anderson and several other members of the town’s Black middle class in the 1850s. With his fair skin, Anderson might have passed for a white slave owner on his repeated travels into Kentucky, where would purportedly pick up 20 to 30 enslaved persons at a time and whisk them away to freedom, sometimes accompanying them as far as the Coffins’ mansion in Newport.

An anti-slavery mob devastated Madison in 1846, almost drowning an agent of the Underground Railroad, prompting Anderson to flee upriver to Lawrenceburg, Indiana, where he eventually settled.

While carrying on his operations, he aided around 800 other fugitives before being arrested and imprisoned in Kentucky for “enticing slaves to flee.” Anderson was found dead in his cell on what some accounts claim was the exact day of his parole in 1861, raising suspicions about his death.

8. Thaddeus Stevens

Mr. Thaddeus Stevens is an American lawyer and senator. Bettmann Archive courtesy of Getty Images; Matthew Brady/Bettmann Archive Thaddeus Stevens, a representative from Pennsylvania, was outspoken in his opposition to slavery. The 14th and 15th amendments, which guaranteed African-American citizens equal protection under the law and the right to vote, respectively, were among his many accomplishments, and he also advocated for a radical reconstruction of the South, which included the redistribution of land from white plantation owners to former enslaved people.

Despite this, it wasn’t until 2002 that his Underground Railroad activities were brought to light, when archeologists uncovered a hidden hiding hole in the courtyard of his Lancaster house.

Seward, also served as Underground Railroad “stationmasters” during the era.

The Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad, a vast network of people who helped fugitive slaves escape to the North and to Canada, was not run by any single organization or person. Rather, it consisted of many individuals – many whites but predominently black – who knew only of the local efforts to aid fugitives and not of the overall operation. Still, it effectively moved hundreds of slaves northward each year – according to one estimate,the South lost 100,000 slaves between 1810 and 1850. An organized system to assist runaway slaves seems to have begun towards the end of the 18th century. In 1786 George Washington complained about how one of his runaway slaves was helped by a “society of Quakers, formed for such purposes.” The system grew, and around 1831 it was dubbed “The Underground Railroad,” after the then emerging steam railroads. The system even used terms used in railroading: the homes and businesses where fugitives would rest and eat were called “stations” and “depots” and were run by “stationmasters,” those who contributed money or goods were “stockholders,” and the “conductor” was responsible for moving fugitives from one station to the next.For the slave, running away to the North was anything but easy. The first step was to escape from the slaveholder. For many slaves, this meant relying on his or her own resources. Sometimes a “conductor,” posing as a slave, would enter a plantation and then guide the runaways northward. The fugitives would move at night. They would generally travel between 10 and 20 miles to the next station, where they would rest and eat, hiding in barns and other out-of-the-way places. While they waited, a message would be sent to the next station to alert its stationmaster.The fugitives would also travel by train and boat – conveyances that sometimes had to be paid for. Money was also needed to improve the appearance of the runaways – a black man, woman, or child in tattered clothes would invariably attract suspicious eyes. This money was donated by individuals and also raised by various groups, including vigilance committees.Vigilance committees sprang up in the larger towns and cities of the North, most prominently in New York, Philadelphia, and Boston. In addition to soliciting money, the organizations provided food, lodging and money, and helped the fugitives settle into a community by helping them find jobs and providing letters of recommendation.The Underground Railroad had many notable participants, including John Fairfield in Ohio, the son of a slaveholding family, who made many daring rescues, Levi Coffin, a Quaker who assisted more than 3,000 slaves, and Harriet Tubman, who made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom.

William Still’s National Significance · William Still: An African-American Abolitionist

Who is William Still, and what is his background? During the antebellum period in American history, William Still, a free-born Black man, rose to prominence as a leader of the abolitionist movement and as a writer. He was also one of the most successful Black businessmen in the history of the city of Philadelphia, and he was born in the city of Philadelphia. He was the youngest of eighteen children born to Levin and Charity Still on October 7, 1821, in Burlington County, New Jersey, and was the youngest of their eighteen children.

  1. His father purchased his freedom, and his mother was able to flee slavery in Maryland with the help of a relative.
  2. The virtues of family and effort that his parents instilled in him, together with pride and self-determination, have served him well throughout his life.
  3. After completing his apprenticeship that year, he was employed to work as a clerk at The Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery.
  4. The enactment of the Escaped Slave Act of 1850 resulted in Still’s appointment as head of the society’s resurrected Vigilance Committee, which assisted and supported fugitive Africans.
  5. He had no formal education at the time, but he read all he could get his hands on and studied grammar.
  6. He was given the authority to chronicle African resistance to slavery, as well as to write letters to his family and friends and handle commercial affairs.
  7. Still submitted a letter to the newspaper in 1859, expressing his displeasure with the racial prejudice that African Americans were subjected to aboard Philadelphia streetcars.

In his self-published book The Underground Railroad (1872), William Still chronicled the tales of Africans who had been slaves but had earned their freedom via the use of the Underground Railroad.

He engaged literary agents to help him market the book.

He died in 1876.

In 1874, he authored An Address on Voting and Laboring, in which he defended his support for the reform candidate for mayor of Philadelphia, as opposed to the Republican candidate for mayor of the city.

After a forty-year quest, he was able to track down his brother, Peter Still, and assist him in his escape to freedom.

Still, he shown great courage in aiding escaped Africans, even at the danger of his own life.

He was an outspoken supporter of universal suffrage.

As a result of his fame, he was assigned to the Philadelphia Board of Trade in 1861 and, in 1864, to the position of peddler for the food of black troops at Camp William Penn in Pennsylvania.

He also served as a member of the Freedmen’s Aid Commission and was instrumental in the establishment of one of the first YMCAs for black youth.

Justification for the importance of William Still’s collection on a national scale The William Still Papers, which span the years 1865 to 1899, are housed at the Charles L.

It is estimated that Still’s documents contain 140 letters referring to family concerns, as well as 14 images.

As a vital contributor to the success of the Underground Railroad activities in Philadelphia, William Still was an integral member of the city’s free Black population, which played an important role in the Underground Railroad.

Runaways were able to get to safety in the North because to his efforts with the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery’s Vigilance Committee.

His work The Underground Railroad is well-known around the world.

Since the passage of H.R.

Blockson Afro-American Collection to investigate William Still’s papers, which are housed in the Charles L.

This act permitted the establishment of the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom program by the United States National Park Service, which was tasked with the identification of Underground Railroad locations and the popularization of the Underground Railroad movement.

The personal communication of William Still and his family members offers scholars with an insight into the personal lives of William Still and his relatives. For further information about William Still, please visit the following:

  • The Life and Times of William Still
  • William Still’s Contemporaries
  • The Life and Times of William Still Links to connected websites, including links to William Still’s books
  • Links to other relevant websites
  • Searching the Collections will allow you to see William Still’s family pictures, letters, and other primary source items relevant to his life.

Harriet Tubman

Frequently Asked Questions

Who was Harriet Tubman?

In the United States, Harriet Tubman, née Araminta Ross, (born c. 1820 in Dorchester County, Maryland, U.S.—died March 10, 1913 in Auburn, New York) was an abolitionist who managed to escape from slavery in the South and rise to prominence before the American Civil War. As part of the Underground Railroad, which was an extensive covert network of safe homes built specifically for this reason, she was responsible for guiding scores of enslaved persons to freedom in the North. Araminta Ross was born into slavery and eventually assumed her mother’s maiden name, Harriet, as her own.

  1. When she was approximately 12 years old, she reportedly refused to assist an overseer in punishing another enslaved person; as a result, he hurled an iron weight that accidently struck her, causing her to suffer a terrible brain injury, which she would endure for the rest of her life.
  2. Tubman went to Philadelphia in 1849, allegedly on the basis of rumors that she was due to be sold.
  3. In December 1850, she made her way to Baltimore, Maryland, where she was reunited with her sister and two children who had joined her in exile.
  4. A long-held belief that Tubman made around 19 excursions into Maryland and assisted upwards of 300 individuals out of servitude was based on inflated estimates in Sara Bradford’s 1868 biography of Tubman.
  5. If anyone opted to turn back, putting the operation in jeopardy, she reportedly threatened them with a revolver and stated, “You’ll either be free or die,” according to reports.
  6. One such example was evading capture on Saturday evenings since the story would not emerge in the newspapers until the following Monday.
  7. It has been stated that she never lost sight of a runaway she was escorting to safety.

Abolitionists, on the other hand, praised her for her bravery.

Her parents (whom she had brought from Maryland in June 1857) and herself moved to a tiny farm outside Auburn, New York, about 1858, and remained there for the rest of her life.

Tubman spied on Confederate territory while serving with the Second Carolina Volunteers, who were under the leadership of Col.

Montgomery’s forces were able to launch well-coordinated attacks once she returned with intelligence regarding the locations of munitions stockpiles and other strategic assets.

Immediately following the Civil War, Tubman relocated to Auburn, where she began caring for orphans and the elderly, a practice that culminated in the establishment of the Harriet Tubman Home for IndigentAged Negroes in 1892.

Aside from suffrage, Tubman became interested in a variety of other issues, including the abolition of slavery.

A private measure providing for a $20 monthly stipend was enacted by Congress some 30 years after her contribution was recognized. Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Jeff Wallenfeldt was the author of the most recent revision and update to this article.

How Harriet Tubman and William Still Helped the Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad, a network of people who assisted enslaved persons in escaping to the North, was only as strong as the people who were willing to put their own lives in danger to do so. Among those most closely associated with the Underground Railroad were Harriet Tubman, one of the most well-known “conductors,” and William Still, who is generally referred to as the “Father of the Underground Railroad.”

Harriet Tubman escaped slavery and guided others to freedom

Tubman, who was born into slavery in Maryland under the name Araminta Harriet Ross, was able to escape to freedom through the use of the Underground Railroad. Throughout her childhood, she was subjected to regular physical violence and torture as a result of her enslavement. In one of the most severe instances, she was struck in the head with an object weighing two pounds, resulting in her suffering from seizures and narcoleptic episodes for the rest of her life. John Tubman was a free black man when she married him in 1844, but little is known about their relationship other than the fact that she adopted his last name.

  1. Even though she began the journey with her brothers, she eventually completed the 90-mile journey on her own in 1849.
  2. As a result, she crossed the border again in 1850, this time to accompany her niece’s family to Pennsylvania.
  3. Instead, she was in charge of a group of fugitive bond agents.
  4. Her parents and siblings were among those she was able to save.
  5. Tubman, on the other hand, found a way around the law and directed her Underground Railroad to Canada, where slavery was prohibited (there is evidence that one of her stops on an 1851 trip was at the home of abolitionist Frederick Douglass).
  6. “”I was a conductor on the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say things that most conductors are unable to say,” she stated with a sense of accomplishment.

“I never had a problem with my train going off the tracks or losing a passenger.” Continue reading Harriet Tubman: A Timeline of Her Life, Underground Railroad Service, and Activism for more information.

William Still helped more than 800 enslaved people escape

In 1852, under the alias Araminta Harriet Ross, Tubman was born into slavery in Maryland and eventually emancipated via a network known as the Underground Railroad. For the most of her childhood, she was subjected to regular physical assault and torture. One of the most serious incidents occurred when a two-pound weight was hurled at her head, leading her to suffer from seizures and narcoleptic episodes for the rest of her days. John Tubman was a free black man when she married him in 1844, but nothing is known about their connection other than the fact that she adopted his surname.

  • In 1849, she set out on her trek with her brothers, but she eventually completed the 90-mile route on her own.
  • Although Tubman had tasted freedom, she couldn’t take the notion of her family being slaves, so she crossed the border again in 1850, this time to accompany her niece’s family to Pennsylvania.
  • Instead, she gathered a band of fugitive bond agents and led them away from the facility.
  • Her mom and siblings were among the people she saved.
  • Instead of ignoring this, Tubman circumvented it by directing her Underground Railroad to Canada, where slavery was illegal (there is evidence that one of her destinations on an 1851 voyage was at the house of abolitionist Frederick Douglass).
See also:  How Much Are Pictures Of Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad? (Solved)

“Her proudly stated, “I was a conductor on the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say things that other conductors can’t.” In all my years of railroading, I never drove my train off the track or lost a passenger.” Continue reading Harriet Tubman: A Timeline of Her Life, Underground Rail Service, and Activism for more information.

Tubman made regular stops at Still’s station

Tubman was a frequent visitor at Still’s station, since she made a regular stop in Philadelphia on her way to New York. He is also said to have contributed monetarily to several of Tubman’s journeys. Her visits clearly left an effect on him, as evidenced by the inclusion of a section about her in his book, which followed a letter from Thomas Garrett about her ushering in arriving visitors. As Stillwright put it in his book, “Harriet Tubman had become their “Moses,” but not in the same way that Andrew Johnson had been their “Moses of the brown people.” “She had obediently gone down into Egypt and, through her own heroics, had delivered these six bondmen to safety.

But in terms of courage, shrewdness, and selfless efforts to rescue her fellow-men, she was without peer.

“While great anxieties were entertained for her safety, she appeared to be completely free of personal dread,” he went on to say.

will portray William Still, in the upcoming film Harriet. The film will explore the life and spirit of Tubman, and the role that Still had in guiding so many people on the road to freedom.

Harriet Tubman Biography

Tubman, who made a regular stop at Still’s station in Philadelphia, was one of his frequent guests. His financial assistance with several of Tubman’s journeys was also revealed. He must have been impressed by her visits since he featured her in a section in his book, which was inspired by a letter from Thomas Garrett about her welcoming newcomers. As Stillwright put it in his book, “Harriet Tubman had become their “Moses,” but not in the same way that Andrew Johnson had been the “Moses of the brown people.” In the end, she had gone down to Egypt on her word, and she had delivered these six bondmen through her own acts of bravery.

  • But in terms of courage, shrewdness, and selfless efforts to liberate her fellow-men, she was without peer.
  • He went on to describe her accomplishments as “amazing,” pointing out that she had made several forays into the danger zone in the process of getting there.
  • It seems that the thought of being abducted by enslaved-hunters or enslaved-holders never crossed her thoughts.” According to all appearances, she was impenetrable.” Cynthia Erivo will portray Harriet Tubman, and Leslie Odom Jr.
  • The film will explore the life and spirit of Tubman, and the role that Still had in guiding so many people down the path to freedom.

Underground Railroad

Page that is easy to print An underground railroad system of persons who supported fleeing slaves in their journey for freedom existed prior to the American Civil War and was called the Underground Railroad. The word, which was in usage between around 1830 and 1860, alludes to the slaves’ ability to flee in a quick and “invisible” manner. In most cases, they concealed during the day and migrated throughout the night. As code phrases, the fugitives and others who assisted them utilized railroad terms: hiding spots were referred to as “stations,” those who provided assistance were referred to as “conductors,” and the runaways themselves were referred to as “passengers” or “freight.” Runaway slaves relied primarily on other slaves and free blacks, who were seldom misled by white members of the Underground Railroad, in addition to white members of the Underground Railroad.

  1. The most well-known black leader in the movement was Harriet Tubman, a fugitive slave who became renowned as the “Moses” of her people despite the fact that she was illiterate.
  2. The Society of Friends was the driving force behind the Underground Railroad and the abolitionist movement in North Carolina, as well as other states (Quakers).
  3. In 1809, Quaker slaveholders in Guilford County deeded all of their slaves to the North Carolina Yearly Meeting.
  4. The Manumission Society, subsequently known as the North Carolina Manumission Society, was founded in Guilford County in 1816 and grew to include numerous chapters and over 1,600 members within a few years of its founding.
  5. Vestal Coffin operated an Underground Railroad station in Guilford County as early as 1819, according to historical records.
  6. Among the abolitionists in Guilford County, these four men, particularly Levi, were definitely the most well-known.
  7. As a result of the large number of fugitive slaves who sought temporary shelter in his home, it became known as “Union Station.” The Compromise of 1850, which brought California to the Union as a free state, included the Fugitive Slave Act, which was passed by the United States Congress.
  8. Southern states believed that this step would be effective in returning slaves to their masters.
  9. Many authorities and people in the North not only refused to repatriate the fugitives, but they also began to take an active role in the Underground Railroad’s operations in the South.

Most sure, it was not the influx of escaped slaves that had been predicted by antebellum propagandists and subsequent fiction writers (up to 100,000 people). Indeed, it is likely that the actual figure represented just a small proportion of the total number of slaves held in bondage.

Educator Resources:

“Stealing a Little Freedom” — Slave Runaways in North Carolina is the topic for Grade 8. The North Carolina Civic Education Consortium is a non-profit organization dedicated to promoting civic education in North Carolina. John Spencer Bassett and Anti-Slavery Leaders of North Carolina are two sources to consult (1898). Charles L. Blackson’s article “The Underground Railroad: Escape from Slavery” appeared in National Geographic166 (July 1984). North Carolina: A Bicentennial History (William S.

  1. Powell, North Carolina through the Centuries is a historical novel (1989).
  2. Siebert (1898).
  3. Webber in 1891,” according to the image credit.
  4. Featured image courtesy of LearnNC Beginning on May 8, 2012, it will be available.
  5. Williams are co-authors of this work.

The Underground Railroad in Indiana

Mary Schons contributed to this article. The 20th of June, 2019 is a Thursday. For 30 years before to the American Civil War, enslaved African Americans utilized the Underground Railroad to gain their freedom, a network known as the Underground Railroad (1861-1865). The “railroad” employed a variety of routes to transport people from slave-supporting states in the South to “free” states in the North and Canada. Sometimes abolitionists, or persons who were opposed to slavery, were responsible for organizing routes for the Underground Railroad.

  • There was a great deal of activity on the Underground Railroad in the states that bordered the Ohio River, which served as a boundary between slave and free states.
  • Not everyone in Indiana supported the emancipation of enslaved people.
  • Because Indiana was a part of the Underground Railroad, its narrative is the tale of all states that had a role in it.
  • However, while some people did have secret chambers in their homes or carriages, the great bulk of the Underground Railroad consisted of individuals surreptitiously assisting slaves who were attempting to flee slavery in whatever manner they were able to.
  • The persons that were enslaved were referred to as “passengers.” “Stations” were private residences or commercial establishments where passengers and conductors seeking freedom might take refuge.
  • If a new owner supported slavery, or if the residence was revealed to be a station on the Underground Railroad, passengers and conductors were obliged to locate a new station or move on somewhere.
  • Only a small number of people kept records of this hidden activity in order to protect homeowners and others seeking freedom who required assistance.

People who were found assisting those who had fled slavery faced arrest and imprisonment.

No one knows exactly how the Underground Railroad received its name, nor does anybody care.

Another version of the story assigns the name to a freedom-seeker who was apprehended in Washington, D.C., in the year 1839.

A third narrative connects the name to an enslaved man called Tice Davids, who made the decision to pursue his freedom in 1831, according to the legend.

Unfortunately, there was no boat available to take us over the river.

His enslaver returned to Kentucky without him, claiming that Davids had vanished while traveling on a “underground railroad.” To put it another way, the name “Underground Railroad” had been widely accepted by the mid-1840s.

According to Article 6 of the Northwest Ordinance, slavery was prohibited north of the Ohio River; however, the rule did not apply to enslaved persons who were already residing in the region.

Slavery was a common feature of life in the Northwest Territories at the time.

Indiana was established as a territory in 1800, with future United States PresidentWilliam Henry Harrison serving as the area’s first territorial governor.

Harrison and his followers also believed that permitting slavery in Indiana would increase the state’s population.

Their petition was refused by Congress.

The “contract holder” has the authority to determine how long the victim must be held in slavery.

When Indiana became a state in 1816, its stateConstitutioncontained wording that was comparable to Article 6 of the Northwest Ordinance—new enslaved persons were not permitted, but existing enslaved people were allowed to continue in their current state of enslavement.

The term “slave” was still used to describe some Hoosiers as late as the 1820 census.

(White people were exempt from this requirement.) Indiana’s 1851 Constitution prohibited blacks from voting, serving in the military, or testifying in any trial in which a white person was accused of a crime.

All three pathways eventually went to Michigan and subsequently to Canada, although they took different routes.

Lewis Harding said in a 1915 history of Decatur County, Indiana, that the county was a spot where three roads came together after crossing the Ohio River at separate points in the county.

assisted the escaped slaves in every way imaginable,” he adds, using the injunction as an example.

As Harding says, “the sympathies of the majority of the residents of this nation were with the escaped slave and his rescuer.” Historians now feel that the path to independence resembled a spider’s web rather than three independent pathways to freedom.

While traveling, they had to avoid organized networks of patrolmen who grabbed freedom-seekers and held them hostage for ransom money.

Known as the “President of the Underground Railroad,” Coffin is credited for bringing slavery to Indiana in 1826.

In his memoir, Reminiscences, Coffin tells the story of two girls who escaped Tennessee and sought refuge with their grandparents in the Indiana county of Randolph.

They were not, however, destined to live in safety.

When the alarm went off, it attracted the majority of the settlement’s black people together in a single location.

Unknown to them, an uncle of the two girls rode up on his horse at the same time the enslaver was being held at bay by the grandmother’scorn knife.

They were not given any authorization to enter the premises or search for items, according to him.” The uncle remained at the doorway for as long as he could to continue the dispute with the enslaver.

According to the account, the girls were disguised as guys and sneaked past the crowd to where two horses were waiting for them.

The girls were able to make it to Coffin’s residence without incident.

Eliza Harris’s Indefatigable Escape Indiana is the scene of one of the most famous slave escapes in history, which took place in the state of Indiana.

Harris made the snap decision to flee to Canada with her infant son in tow.

There were no bridges, and there was no way for a raft to get through the thick ice.

Moving from one ice floe to another while carrying her child, she eventually made it to the other end.

Eliza, in fact, is the name of the character who travels across the frigid Ohio.

In order to recover from their ordeal, Harris and her child traveled to Levi Coffin’s Fountain City residence.

In 1854, Levi and Catherine Coffin were on a visit to Canada with their daughter when a woman approached Catherine and introduced herself.

God’s blessings on you!” It was Eliza Harris, who had safely relocated to Chatham, Ontario, Canada, when the call came in.

Illustration provided courtesy of The Library of Congress is a federal government institution that collects and organizes information.

Examine the list of locations to determine if any are in your immediate vicinity.

But it was carried out according to a completely different set of rules.

.

Levi Coffin’s Reminiscences, published in 1880abet Help is a verb that refers to assisting in the committing of a crime.

abolitionist A person who is opposed to slavery as a noun.

authority Making choices is the responsibility of a nounperson or organization.

The payment of a fine or the performance of a contract under the terms of an agreement constitutes a bond, which is an unenforceable agreement.

cattle Andoxen are nouncows.

The American Civil War The American Civil War was fought between the Union (north) and the Confederacy between 1860 and 1865.

conductor A person who escorted slaves to safety and freedom on the Underground Railroad was known as a guide.

The House of Representatives and the Senate are the two chambers of the United States Congress.

See also:  How Did The Underground Railroad Start? (Professionals recommend)

convictVerb to find someone guilty of committing a criminal offense.

Municipality is a type of political entity that is smaller than a state or province, but often larger than a city, town, or other municipality.

defendantNounperson or entity who has been accused of committing a crime or engaging in other misconduct.

economy The production, distribution, and consumption of commodities and services are all referred to as a system.

enslave acquainted with the verbto completely control Adjectivewell-known.

forbidVerb to ban or prohibit something.

fugitive a noun or an adjective that has gotten away from the law or another limitation a system or order established by a country, a state, or any other political body; government Harriet Beecher Stowe was an American writer and abolitionist activist who lived from 1811 to 1896.

Nouna huge, flat sheet of ice that is floating on the surface of a body of water.

labor is a noun that refers to work or employment.

Throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the adjective negronoun was frequently used to refer to people of African descent.

During the American Civil War, the North was comprised of states that supported the United States (Union).

A portion of the modern-day states of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota belonged to the Northwest Territory at the time of its creation.

The Ohio River is the greatest tributary of the Mississippi River, with a length of 1,580 kilometers (981 miles).

passenger A runaway slave seeking freedom on the Underground Railroad is referred to as a noun.

Requests are made verbally, and are frequently accompanied by a document signed by the respondents.

prominentAdjectivethat is significant or stands out.

recover from an injury or strenuous activityVerb to recover from an injury or strenuous activity repeal a verb that means to overturn or reject something that was previously guaranteed rouse a verb that means to awaken or make active.

Slavery is a noun that refers to the act of owning another human being or being owned by another human being (also known as servitude).

South During the American Civil War, the Confederate States of America (Confederacy) was supported or sympathized with by a large number of states.

Supreme CourtNounin the United States, the highest judicial authority on questions of national or constitutional significance.

terminology A noungroup of terms that are used in a specialized subject area.

Nounland that is protected from intruders by an animal, a human, or the government.

the southern hemisphere Geographic and political region in the south-eastern and south-central parts of the United States that includes all of the states that sided with the Confederacy during the American Civil War.

unconstitutional Adjective that refers to a violation of the laws of the United States Constitution.

9th President of the United States of America, William Henry HarrisonNoun (1773-1841). (1841). word-of-mouth Informal communication, sometimes known as rumor or rumor mill. NounA official order issued by a government or other authoritative body.

Media Credits

Mary Schons contributed to this report. on the 20th of June in the year of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ When enslaved black Americans attempted to gain their freedom in the 30 years preceding the American Civil War, they turned to the Underground Railroad for assistance (1861-1865). Slavery-supporting states in the South were served by a network of “railroads” that connected them to “free” states in the North and Canada. Sometimes abolitionists, people who were opposed to slavery, organized routes for the Underground Railroad.

  • There was a great deal of activity on the Underground Railroad in the states that bordered the Ohio River, which served as a border between slave and free states.
  • Despite widespread support for emancipation, not all Hoosiers were on board with it.
  • Because Indiana was a part of the Underground Railroad, its history is the story of all states that participated in it.
  • To the dismay of many, the Underground Railroad did not consist of a network of underground passageways.
  • People who traveled south to find enslaved people who were looking for freedom were referred to as “pilots” in railroad jargon.
  • “Passengers” were the term used to describe the enslaved.
  • With each change in ownership of the house, additional or fewer stations were added to the Underground Railroad network.

It was done in a quiet manner, by word of mouth, that the stations were being established.

Liberation aspirants would be compelled to return to servitude if they were apprehended and brought to justice.

Slavery was backed by both states that supported slavery and free states, and this extended to both groups.

According to one account, the term was coined by failed Pennsylvania patrolmen who attempted to kidnap freedom seekers.

He claimed that he collaborated with others to flee to the North, where “the railroad ran underground all the way to Boston,” after being tortured by his captors.

Eventually, Davids managed to get away from his Kentucky enslaver and make it to the Ohio River in time.

When Davids realized he was about to be captured, he swam across the river to the other side and slipped out of sight.

To put it another way, the term “Underground Railroad” had become widely used by the mid-1840s.

When the new United States government established the Northwest Territory in 1787, it included the land that would eventually become Indiana as part of that territory.

Even though no one else was allowed to be enslaved in 1787, people who were enslaved in 1787 remained so.

Vincennes and FloydCountyin the south, and as far north as La Porte, are two places where evidence of slavery has been found.

Because Harrison believed that slavery would help the economy grow, he encouraged its use.

For a period of ten years, the politicians and business leaders of Indiana petitioned Congress to repeal Article 6.

Indiana Territory House of Representatives passed a new law in 1805 that allowed people to keep enslaved people who had been acquired in the United States after they were brought to the country.

Property was extended to the enslaved person’s children, as well.

Indiana was a free state by 1816, but it was not a welcoming state for African-Americans.

) (This was not required of white people.

Indiana’s Underground Railroad (also known as the Indiana Underground Railroad System) There were three main routes of the Underground Railroad in Indiana, according to popular belief at the time of the discovery.

The slavery trade in Canada was abolished in 1833.

Decatur County, Indiana, was described by Lewis Harding in his history of the county published in 1915 as a place where three routes came together after crossing the Ohio River at various points.

assisted the fugitive slaves in every way possible,” he writes, citing the injunction as his source.

As Harding writes, “the sympathies of the vast majority of the citizens of this country were with the fugitive slave and his aid.” Rather than three distinct routes to freedom, historians now believe the path to freedom resembled a spider’s web.

While traveling, they had to avoid organized networks of patrolmen who kidnapped freedom-seekers and held them hostage in exchange for ransom payments.

Levi Coffin of Newport, Indiana, was the most well-known Underground Railroad “station master” in the state (now called Fountain City).

The couple claimed to have housed approximately 2,000 people over the course of two decades, spreading bedrolls on their kitchen floor to accommodate as many people as they could fit in.

“It was there that the girls stayed after their long and perilous journey of enjoying their newly gained independence and hoping that their master would never find out where they had gone.” They had no intention of remaining in safety, however.

Their captor, as well as a band of men from Richmond and Winchester, were awakened by this event.

Around the grandparents’ cabin, more than 200 people gathered to surround and protect them from harm.

“He demanded to see the writ, which was handed to him by the officer,” Levi explains.

He denied that they were given any authority to enter the house and search for property.” The uncle remained at the doorway as long as he could to continue the debate with the enslaver.

According to the story, the girls were disguised as boys and smuggled through the crowd to a location where two horses awaited for them.

To Coffin’s house, the girls were able to make it without incident.

One of Eliza Harris’ children was sold for money in the winter of 1830, according to her enslaver, who she overheard saying he was planning to sell another of her children for money.

Eventually, she managed to slip away and flee to the Ohio River.

Harris jumped onto a chunk of ice floating in the river after hearing her enslaver’s horse approaching.

It was in Uncle Tom’s Cabin, a novel by Harriet Beecher Stowe, that Harris’ daring escape was recounted.

It went on to become one of the most influential novels in history, causing many Americans to sympathize with enslaved people and abolitionists as a result of reading it.

They then reportedly spent some time in the nearby town of Pennville, Indiana, before continuing their journey northwards.

“How are you, Aunt Katie?” the woman exclaimed as she snatched Catherine’s hand in her own.

God bless you!” It was Eliza Harris, who had safely relocated to Chatham, Ontario, Canada, from her previous residence in the United Kingdom.

Thank you for using this illustration National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) (also known as the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)) The Underground Railroad Has Arrived.

Analyze the list of locations to determine if any are in your immediate vicinity.

A completely different approach was taken in its execution.

.

1880abet, Levi Coffin wrote his reminiscences.

abolish is a verb that means to eliminate or eliminate something.

accommodate Provide or satisfy is a verb.

presumptive or presumptiveAdjectives that are alleged Roughly Adjective that refers to a figure that is either general or close to exact.

baffle verb to be perplexed and annoyed The payment of a fine or the performance of a contract under the terms of an agreement is referred to as a bond.

cattle ‘Nouncows’ are a type of adverb.

In the American Civil War (also known as the American Revolutionary War), The American conflict between the Union (north) and the Confederacy between 1860 and 1865 is referred to as the American Civil War (south).

Both the House of Representatives and the Senate comprise the United States Congress.

Someone is found guilty of an illegal act when they are found guilty by a jury.

An administrative unit that is smaller than a state or province but typically larger than a city, town, or other municipality.

DefendantNounperson or organization who has been accused of engaging in criminal activity or another type of misconduct dwell To reside in a specific location is the verb to reside.

encourage Verb to motivate or encourage someone or something.

well-known Adjectivewell-known.

forbidVerb to forbid or prohibit something from happening.

fugitive a noun or an adjective that has gotten away from a law or other constraint a system or order established by a nation, a state, or some other political unit Noun Abolitionist leader and author Harriet Beecher StoweNoun(1811-1896) was an American writer and activist who was active in the abolitionist movement.

  • ice floe influential Important in terms of having the ability to influence the opinions or attitudes of others; influential in terms of being influential in terms of being influential.
  • Nounwork or employment is defined as: labor.
  • A network is a series of interconnected links that allows for movement and communication.
  • a region of the United States that stretched between the Mississippi River and Pennsylvania’s western border, and north of the Ohio River (from 1787 to 1803).
  • novelNounA fictional narrative or story that is told in a fictional manner.
  • ostensibly It is a noun that means to pretend or show up.
  • perilousAdjectivedangerous.

pilot Person who traveled to slave states in search of slaves desiring freedom and willing to sacrifice their lives in order to obtain it was known as an informer on the Underground Railroad.

adjective significant or distinguishing itself from the rest of the crowd ransom Property release or return fees are referred to as nounfees.

repeal Something that was once assured is being overturned or rejected.

slave hunter Uncountable person who goes in search of fugitive slaves with the intention of forcing them back into servitude.

smuggle Take something secretly or steal it is the definition of the word “steal.” South An ill-defined geographic territory mostly consisted of states that either backed or were sympathetic to the Confederate States of America (Confederacy) during the American Civil War.

Those who identify with the Supreme CourtNounthe highest judicial authority in the United States on questions of national or constitutional significance To comprehend or share a feeling or emotion is to use the verb understand.

terrain Topographic features of a particular area are denoted by the noun.

a region in the southeastern United States a geological and political region in the south-eastern and south-central regions of the United States that includes all of the states that backed the Confederacy during the American civil war In Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote an anti-slavery novel in 1852, which became known as the Uncle Tom’s Cabin Noun.

9th President of the United States, William Henry HarrisonNoun (1773-1841). (1841). word-of-mouth Informal communication, often known as rumor, NounA official order issued by a government or other authoritative authority.

Writer

Mary Schons is a writer who lives in New York City.

Editors

Kara West, Emdash Editing, Jeannie Evers, Emdash Editing

Producer

Kara West, Emdash Editing, Jeannie Evers, and Emdash Publishing

Last Updated

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