Why Is The Underground Railroad An Important Part To The Heritage Of African-americans? (Best solution)

They helped African Americans escape from enslavement in the American South to free Northern states or to Canada. The Underground Railroad was the largest anti-slavery freedom movement in North America. They helped African Americans escape from enslavement in the American South to free Northern states or to Canada.

What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad Quizlet?

  • Underground Railroad The Underground Railroad was a secret network of abolitionists (people who wanted to abolish slavery). They helped African Americans escape from enslavement in the American South to free Northern states or to Canada. The Underground Railroad was the largest anti-slavery freedom movement in North America.

Why was the Underground Railroad important to slaves?

The Underground Railroad was a secret system developed to aid fugitive slaves on their escape to freedom. The free individuals who helped runaway slaves travel toward freedom were called conductors, and the fugitive slaves were referred to as cargo.

Why is the Underground Railroad important to American history?

The underground railroad, where it existed, offered local service to runaway slaves, assisting them from one point to another. The primary importance of the underground railroad was that it gave ample evidence of African American capabilities and gave expression to African American philosophy.

How did the Underground Railroad help enslaved African Americans?

How did the Underground Railroad help enslaved African Americans? It provided a network of escape routes toward the North. In his pamphlet Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World, on what did David Walker base his arguments against slavery? They feared that the abolition of slavery would destroy their economy.

What impact did the Underground Railroad have on America?

The work of the Underground Railroad resulted in freedom for many men, women, and children. It also helped undermine the institution of slavery, which was finally ended in the United States during the Civil War. Many slaveholders were so angry at the success of the Underground Railroad that they grew to hate the North.

Why was the Underground Railroad important to the Civil War?

The Underground Railroad physically resisted the repressive laws that held slaves in bondage. By provoking fear and anger in the South, and prompting the enactment of harsh legislation that eroded the rights of white Americans, the Underground Railroad was a direct contributing cause of the Civil War.

Was the Underground Railroad effective?

Ironically the Fugitive Slave Act increased Northern opposition to slavery and helped hasten the Civil War. The Underground Railroad gave freedom to thousands of enslaved women and men and hope to tens of thousands more. In both cases the success of the Underground Railroad hastened the destruction of slavery.

How did the Underground Railroad help promote justice?

The Underground Railroad became a catalyst for propaganda as both the abolitionists and slave owners used tales of escape to gain popular support for their cause. The abolitionists used the stories of successful escapes to rally to action those who supported the causes of equality and freedom.

What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad quizlet?

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses established in the United States during the early-to-mid 19th century, and used by African-American slaves to escape into free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause.

What does Underground Railroad mean in history?

-Harriet Tubman, 1896. The Underground Railroad—the resistance to enslavement through escape and flight, through the end of the Civil War—refers to the efforts of enslaved African Americans to gain their freedom by escaping bondage. Wherever slavery existed, there were efforts to escape.

What was the purpose of the Underground Railroad apex?

What was the Underground Railroad? It was not an actual railroad. It was a network of houses and buildings that were used to help slaves escape from the South to freedom in the Northern states or Canada.

What is the significance of the Underground Railroad in Canada?

In all 30,000 slaves fled to Canada, many with the help of the underground railroad – a secret network of free blacks and white sympathizers who helped runaways. Canada was viewed as a safe haven, where a black person could be free.

What inspired the Underground Railroad?

Quaker Abolitionists In the early 1800s, Quaker abolitionist Isaac T. Hopper set up a network in Philadelphia that helped enslaved people on the run. At the same time, Quakers in North Carolina established abolitionist groups that laid the groundwork for routes and shelters for escapees.

Why was Harriet Tubman important to the Underground Railroad?

Harriet Tubman is perhaps the most well-known of all the Underground Railroad’s “conductors.” During a ten-year span she made 19 trips into the South and escorted over 300 slaves to freedom. And, as she once proudly pointed out to Frederick Douglass, in all of her journeys she “never lost a single passenger.”

Underground Railroad

Underground Railroad was a network of people, both black and white, who helped escaped enslaved persons from the southern United States by providing them with refuge and assistance. It came forth as a result of the convergence of numerous separate covert initiatives. Although the exact dates of its inception are unknown, it was active from the late 18th century until the Civil War, after which its attempts to weaken the Confederacy were carried out in a less-secretive manner until the Civil War ended.

Quaker Abolitionists

Underground Railroad was a network of people, both black and white, who helped escaped enslaved persons from the South by providing them with refuge and assistance. A number of separate covert operations came together to form the organization. Although the exact dates of its creation are unknown, it was active from the late 18th century until the Civil War, after which its attempts to weaken the Confederacy were carried out in a less-secretive manner until the Union was defeated.

What Was the Underground Railroad?

The Underground Railroad was first mentioned in 1831, when an enslaved man named Tice Davids managed to escape from Kentucky into Ohio and his master blamed a “underground railroad” for assisting Davids in his liberation. When a fugitive slave called Jim was apprehended in 1839 in Washington, the press said that the guy confessed his plan to travel north along a “underground railroad to Boston” while under torture. The Vigilance Committees, which were established in New York in 1835 and Philadelphia in 1838 to safeguard escaped enslaved persons from bounty hunters, rapidly expanded their duties to include guiding enslaved individuals on the run.

MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: Harriet Tubman and her fellow fugitives used the following strategies to escape through the Underground Railroad:

How the Underground Railroad Worked

Enslaved man Tice Davids fled from Kentucky into Ohio in 1831, and his master blamed a “underground railroad” for assisting Davids in his release. This was the first time the Underground Railroad was mentioned in print. In 1839, a Washington newspaper stated that an escaped enslaved man called Jim had divulged, after being tortured, his intention to go north through a “underground railroad to Boston” in order to avoid capture. After being established in New York in 1835 and Philadelphia in 1838 to safeguard fugitive enslaved individuals from bounty hunters, Vigilance Committees quickly expanded its duties to include guiding runaway slaves.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE READ THESE STATEMENTS.

Fugitive Slave Acts

The Fugitive Slave Acts were a major cause for many fugitive slaves to flee to Canada. This legislation, which was passed in 1793, authorized local governments to catch and extradite fugitive enslaved individuals from inside the borders of free states back to their places of origin, as well as to penalize anybody who assisted the fleeing enslaved people. Personal Liberty Laws were introduced in certain northern states to fight this, but they were overturned by the Supreme Court in 1842. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was intended to reinforce the preceding legislation, which was perceived by southern states to be insufficiently enforced at the time of passage.

The northern states were still considered a danger zone for fugitives who had managed to flee.

Some Underground Railroad operators chose to station themselves in Canada and sought to assist fugitives who were arriving to settle in the country.

Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was the most well-known conductor of the Underground Railroad during its heyday. When she and two of her brothers fled from a farm in Maryland in 1849, she was given the name Harriet (her married name was Tubman). She was born Araminta Ross, and she was raised as Harriet Tubman. They returned a couple of weeks later, but Tubman fled on her own again shortly after, this time making her way to the state of Pennsylvania. In following years, Tubman returned to the plantation on a number of occasions to rescue family members and other individuals.

Tubman was distraught until she had a vision of God, which led her to join the Underground Railroad and begin escorting other fugitive slaves to the Maryland state capital.

Frederick Douglass

In his house in Rochester, New York, former enslaved person and celebrated author Frederick Douglasshid fugitives who were assisting 400 escapees in their journey to freedom in Canada. Reverend Jermain Loguen, a former fugitive who lived in the adjacent city of Syracuse, assisted 1,500 escapees on their journey north. The Vigilance Committee was established in Philadelphia in 1838 by Robert Purvis, an escaped enslaved person who later became a trader. Josiah Henson, a former enslaved person and railroad operator, founded the Dawn Institute in Ontario in 1842 to assist fugitive slaves who made their way to Canada in learning the necessary skills to find work.

Agent,” according to the document.

John Parker was a free Black man living in Ohio who worked as a foundry owner and who used his rowboat to ferry fugitives over the Ohio River.

William Still was a notable Philadelphia citizen who was born in New Jersey to runaway slaves parents who fled to Philadelphia as children.

Who Ran the Underground Railroad?

The vast majority of Underground Railroad operators were regular individuals, including farmers and business owners, as well as preachers and religious leaders. Some affluent individuals were active, including Gerrit Smith, a billionaire who stood for president on two separate occasions. Smith acquired a full family of enslaved people from Kentucky in 1841 and freed them from their captivity. Levi Coffin, a Quaker from North Carolina, is credited with being one of the first recorded individuals to assist escaped enslaved persons.

Coffin stated that he had discovered their hiding spots and had sought them out in order to assist them in moving forward.

Finally, they were able to make their way closer to him. Coffin eventually relocated to Indiana and then Ohio, where he continued to assist fugitive enslaved individuals no matter where he was.

John Brown

Abolitionist John Brown worked as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, and it was at this time that he founded the League of Gileadites, which was dedicated to assisting fleeing enslaved individuals in their journey to Canada. Abolitionist John Brown would go on to play a variety of roles during his life. His most well-known duty was conducting an assault on Harper’s Ferry in order to raise an armed army that would march into the deep south and free enslaved people at gunpoint. Ultimately, Brown’s forces were beaten, and he was executed for treason in 1859.

  1. The year 1844, he formed a partnership with Vermont schoolteacher Delia Webster, and the two were jailed for assisting an escaped enslaved lady and her young daughter.
  2. Charles Torrey was sentenced to six years in jail in Maryland for assisting an enslaved family in their attempt to flee through Virginia.
  3. After being apprehended in 1844 while transporting a boatload of freed slaves from the Caribbean to the United States, Massachusetts sea captain Jonathan Walker was sentenced to prison for life.
  4. John Fairfield of Virginia turned down the opportunity to assist in the rescue of enslaved individuals who had been left behind by their families as they made their way north.
  5. He managed to elude capture twice.

End of the Line

Operation of the Underground Railroad came to an end in 1863, during the American Civil War. In actuality, its work was shifted aboveground as part of the Union’s overall campaign against the Confederate States of America. Once again, Harriet Tubman made a crucial contribution by organizing intelligence operations and serving as a commanding officer in Union Army efforts to rescue the liberated enslaved people who had been freed. MORE INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT: Harriet Tubman led a daring Civil War raid after the Underground Railroad was shut down.

Sources

During the American Civil War, the Underground Railroad came to an end about 1863. When it came to the Union fight against the Confederacy, its activity was carried out aboveground. This time around, Harriet Tubman played a critical role in the Union Army’s efforts to rescue the recently liberated enslaved people by conducting intelligence operations and serving in the role of leadership.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE READ THESE STATEMENTS. Harriet Tubman Led a Brutal Civil War Raid Following the Underground Railroad.

Teaching the Underground Railroad

During the Civil War, the Underground Railroad came to an end about 1863. Rather than remaining underground, its operations were shifted aboveground as part of the Union’s campaign against the Confederacy. Harriet Tubman made a crucial contribution once more, this time by overseeing intelligence operations and serving as a commanding officer in Union Army efforts to rescue the liberated enslaved people. READ MORE ABOUT IT: Harriet Tubman Led a Brutal Civil War Raid Following the Underground Railroad

  • By selecting the resources mentioned under each topic, you may learn more about each of the subjects listed below. Make a list of the events and make a note of how they are connected to one another. Consider the dates of important events in your life in particular. After going over these events, you should be able to construct a more comprehensive picture of the Underground Railroad’s efforts. It should become clear how these occurrences are related to one another and what they mean
  • Use some type of technology to illustrate the link between these events and the Underground Railroad (e.g., word cloud, idea map—which requires basic membership to save) to illustrate the relationship between these events and the Underground Railroad.
See also:  Why Was Underground Railroad Created? (Correct answer)

“Before I arrived to this session, I was under the impression that I was well-versed in the fundamentals of this tough period in our history. Slaves and historical figures such as Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass are well-known to us. What I didn’t realize at the time was that there was a lot more to the Underground Railroad than the minimal facts I had gleaned through my schooling.” Summer 2013 Reflection by a University Student

  • The Underground Railroad and the Gullah/Geechee Nation
  • The Seminole History of the Gullah/Geechee Nation and the Underground Railroad
  • The Gullah/Geechee Nation’s Seminole History and the Underground Railroad
  • The Gullah: Rice Slavery, 7 the Sierra Leone-American Connection, and 8 the Gullah: Rice Slavery
  • Aboard the Underground Railroad: The British Fort
  • Florida’s Underground Railroad – Part 3
  • Rebellion: John Horse and the Black Seminoles
  • Black Seminoles
  • The Freedom Seeker
  • Aboard the Underground Railroad: The British Fort

While Traveling on the Underground Railroad: A Visit to a British Fort; Florida’s Underground Railroad – Part 3; Rebellion: John Horse and the African American Seminoles; The African American Seminoles; The Freedom Seeker;

  • The Underground Railroad Connection
  • Women in the Abolitionist Movement
  • The Underground Railroad Timeline
  • The Underground Railroad Connection

Summary

By taking a more comprehensive view of the Underground Railroad, we may have a greater understanding of not just why this event was so crucial historically, but also how it continues to be significant in contemporary times. By connecting historical events together, you will be able to present students with a more thorough understanding of the Underground Railroad and the history of the Abolitionist Movement than you would otherwise be able to. Following that, you will learn how to create high-quality lesson plans by employing a multicultural perspective.

North Star to Freedom (U.S. National Park Service)

Harriet Tubman as a young woman, around 1860s, seen in a seated picture. The Library of Congress is a federal government institution that collects and organizes information. The National Park Service tells the story of Harriet Tubman, a former slave who became an abolitionist, the Underground Railroad, and the many great Americans who lived throughout the 1800s whose daring deeds carried slaves to freedom and contributed to the abolition of slavery. The National Park Service (NPS) looks on the significance of the night sky in the lives of the founding fathers of our country as we commemorate our nation’s freedom.

  1. Traveling under the cover of darkness generally provided the finest opportunities for escape.
  2. The capacity of a runaway to safely get to a safe house, railroad station, or the woods without the aid of these equipment was frequently a matter of life and death.
  3. NPS According to slave legend, the North Star played an important role in assisting slaves in their quest for freedom, serving as a light to the true north.
  4. This item’s form is similar to a dipping ladle or drinking gourd, as implied by its name.
  5. For millennia, celestial navigation knowledge (navigating by studying the stars and other patterns in the night sky) was passed down from generation to generation by oral tradition.
  6. Slaves were able to navigate their path without becoming disoriented as a result of this information.
  7. Many slave narratives and ballads made use of the Big Dipper and the North Star as symbols of freedom.
  8. The night sky is a canvas of storytelling that connects us to our ancestors and their history.

When you look up at the night sky, remember the story of the drinking gourd and those early Americans who placed their lives on the promise of freedom on a star. Follow the sheet music and fragments of the Drinking Gourd. The Texas Folklore Society was founded in 1928.

Follow the Drinking Gourd

When the light returns and the firs’ quail begin to call, you know it is time to go. Follow the drinkin’ gou’d wherever he goes. If you want to drink, you should drink; if you want to drink, you should drink. “Foller the drinkin gou’d,” said the elderly gentleman. The riva comes to an end between two hills,following the drinking gou’d; there is another riva on the opposite side. ‘Follers the drinkin gou’d,’ said the bartender. What’s up with the small riva? Meet the hulking colossus, Foller the drinkin’ gou’d is waiting for the elderly guy.

Learn more:

  • Harriet Tubman is a historical figure. Underground Railroad National Historical Park in Maryland
  • The Underground Railroad Network to Freedom
  • The Civil War
  • Exploring Night Skies in National Parks
  • Underground Railroad National Historical Park in Maryland
  • In the night sky, there are signs of spring

Julie West, Communications Specialist for the National Park Service’s Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division, contributed to this article.

Underground Railroad

The Underground Railroad was a clandestine network of abolitionists that operated between 1861 and 1865. (people who wanted to abolish slavery). In order to get away from enslavement in the American South, they assisted African Americans in escaping to free northern states or Canada. The Underground Railroad was the most important anti-slavery emancipation movement in North America at the time of its founding. It was responsible for transporting between 30,000 and 40,000 fugitives to British North America (nowCanada).

  • Please check The Underground Railroad for a plain English explanation of the subject matter (Plain-Language Summary).
  • (people who wanted to abolish slavery).
  • The Underground Railroad was the most important anti-slavery emancipation movement in North America at the time of its founding.
  • This is the full-length entry on the Underground Railroad that can be found here.

Origins

It was a hidden network of abolitionists that was known as the Underground Railroad (people who wanted to abolish slavery). In order to get away from enslavement in the American South, they assisted African Americans in escaping to free Northern states or Canada. As the biggest anti-slavery emancipation movement in North America, the Underground Railroad was known as the “Great Society.” A total of between 30,000 and 45,000 fugitives were transported to British North America by the organization (nowCanada).

Please check The Underground Railroad for a plain English overview (Plain-Language Summary).

They aided African Americans in their attempts to flee captivity in the American South to the free Northern states or to the Canadian colonies.

About the Underground Railroad: This is the in-depth entry on the subject. Please check The Underground Railroad for a straightforward overview (Plain-Language Summary).

Organization

This underground network of abolitionists was established in the early nineteenth century, with the majority of its members being based in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Within a few decades, it had developed into a well-organized and vibrant network of organizations. The phrase “Underground Railroad” first appeared in the 1830s and has been in use ever since. It had already begun to take shape at that point, an informal covert network to assist escaping slaves. The Underground Railroad was not a real train, and it did not operate on actual railroad rails like other railroads.

abolitionists who were devoted to human rights and equality were responsible for keeping the network running.

Its members comprised free Blacks, fellow enslaved individuals, White and Indigenous supporters, Quakers, Methodists, and Baptists, residents of urban centers and farmers, men and women, from all over the world (including the United States and Canada).

Symbols and Codes

In order to conceal the clandestine actions of the network, railroad language and symbols were employed. This also assisted in keeping the general public and slaveholders in the dark. Escaped slaves were referred to as “conductors” by those who assisted them on their voyage. It was their job to guide fugitives via the Underground Railroad’s routes, which included numerous kinds of transit on land and sea. Harriet Tubman was one of the most well-known conductors in history. The names “passengers,” “cargo,” “package,” and “freight” all referred to fugitive slaves on their way to freedom.

Terminals, which were stations located in numerous cities and towns, were referred to as “terminals.” Occasionally, lighted candles in windows or strategically positioned lanterns in the front yard may be used to identify these ephemeral havens of safety.

Station Masters

“Station masters” were in charge of running the safe houses. They welcomed fugitives into their house and gave them with meals, a change of clothing, and a safe haven to rest and hide from the authorities. Prior to delivering them to the next transfer location, they would frequently give them money. WilliamStill, a black abolitionist who lived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was in command of a station there. He accompanied a large number of freedom seekers on their way to Canada. He kept a list of the men, women, and children that came to his station, including Tubman and her passengers, and he transcribed their names.

He was the owner and operator of a radio station in Syracuse, New York.

Catharines, both in Upper Canada, from 1837 until 1841, when he decided to permanently move there.

A large number of women worked as station masters as well.

Lucretia Mott and Laura Haviland, both Quakerwomen, as well as Henrietta Bowers Duterte, the first Black female undertaker in Philadelphia, are just a few of the women honored. A large number of other women worked alongside their spouses to own radio stations.

Ticket Agents

“Ticket agents” assisted freedom-seekers in coordinating safe excursions and making travel arrangements by putting them in touch with station masters or conductors, among other things. It was not uncommon for ticket agents to be people who traveled for a living, such as circuit preachers or physicians, to work. They were able to hide their abolitionist operations as a result of this. Among those who served on the Underground Railroad were doctors such as Alexander Milton Ross (born in Belleville).

He also gave them with a few basic items so that they could get started on their escape.

Ways to the Promised Land

“Lines” were the names given to the pathways that people took in order to reach freedom. In total, 14 northern states and two British North American colonies — Upper Canada and Lower Canada — were connected by the network of roads. At the end of the line lay “heaven,” also known as “the Promised Land,” which was undeveloped land in Canada or the Northern United States. A nod to the Big Dipper constellation, which points to the North Star and serves as a navigational aid for freedom-seekers seeking their way north, “the drinking gourd” was a reference to the Big Dipper.

A large number of people undertook the perilous journey on foot.

The Underground Railroad, on the other hand, did not simply operate on land.

They traveled at night and slept throughout the day on a regular basis.

The Canadian Terminus

During the last decades of enslavement in the United States, an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 freedom seekers crossed the border into Canada. Approximately 15,000 to 20,000 fugitives entered the Province of Canada between 1850 and 1860 alone. Because of this, it became the primary terminal for the Underground Railroad. The immigrants settled in various sections of what is now the province of Ontario. Among these were Niagara Falls, Buxton, Chatham, Owen Sound, Windsor, Sandwich (now a part of Windsor), Hamilton, Brantford, London, Oakville, and Toronto.

  1. Following this huge migration, Black Canadians assisted in the creation of strong communities and made significant contributions to the development of the provinces in where they lived and worked.
  2. The Provincial Freeman newspaper published a thorough report of a specific case in its publication.
  3. They were on the lookout for a young man by the name of Joseph Alexander.
  4. Alexandra was present among the throngs of people and had a brief verbal encounter with his previous owner.

He turned down the men’s offer of $100 in exchange for accompanying them to Windsor. The guys were forced to flee town after the mob refused to allow them to steal Alexander’s possessions. Alexander was left to live his life in complete freedom.

Legacy

During the latter decades of enslavement in the United States, an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 freedom seekers invaded Canada. Approximately 15,000 to 20,000 fugitives crossed into the Province of Canada between 1850 and 1860 alone. It eventually became the primary terminal of the Underground Railroad in the United States. In the following decades, the immigrants established themselves in numerous locations throughout what is now Ontario. Among those were Niagara Falls, Buxton, Chatham, Owen Sound, Windsor, Sandwich (now a part of Windsor), Hamilton, Brantford, London, Oakville, and Toronto.

  • During and after this wave of mass migration, Black Canadians contributed to the development of their communities and the advancement of the provinces in which they resided and worked.
  • An in-depth examination of one particular instance was published in the Provincial Freeman newspaper.
  • A young guy called Joseph Alexander was the subject of their investigation.
  • Alexandra was there among the throngs of people, and he and his old owner exchanged pleasantries.
  • Eventually, the men were forced to flee town because the throng would not allow them to take Alexander.

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead – Teacher’s Guide: 9780345804327

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR TEACHERS Instructions for Teachers The Underground Railroad is a term used to describe a system of transportation that allows people to flee their homes. Cora, a young African American lady who goes to freedom from the antebellum South via a magnificently conceived physical—rather than metaphorical—railroad, is introduced in The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead. The locations and people Cora experiences throughout the novel, which is told in episodes, furnish her and the reader with important discoveries about the consequences of captivity.

The reader is reminded of the importance of hope, of resistance, and of freedom via Cora, making The Underground Railroadan essential supplement to any classroom curriculum.

See also:  When Is Underground Railroad Based Book? (Best solution)

An understanding of the slave trade, slavery, and how it operated in the United States is necessary in order to make sense of the number of Africans who were enslaved and the historical legacy of enslavement that has lasted through Reconstruction, the civil rights movement, and up to the present day in the United States.

  1. Most importantly, including The Underground Railroadallows readers to bear witness to a counter-narrative of slavery that is not generally covered in the literature on slavery.
  2. Because of the Underground Railroad, we are reminded that her tale may be used as a springboard for bigger talks about racism, gender, and a slew of other critical issues.
  3. When used at the collegiate level, the book is suited for writing and literary classes, race and gender studies, and first-year/common reading programs, among other things.
  4. The prompts are organized according to the standard that they most directly support.
  5. For a comprehensive listing of the Standards, please see the following link: warnings: There are multiple instances of violence throughout the text (sexual and physical).
  6. Although teachers should not avoid exposing children to these events, guiding them through them via conversation and critical analysis will help them gain a better understanding of the consequences of enslavement as it has been experienced by so many people throughout history.
  7. Activity in the Classroom Make a list of all the ways in which Cora fights against the dehumanization that comes with servitude.

Then hold a Socratic seminar to determine in what ways she is a “insurrection of one” (172) and why her resistance is such a threat to the system of white supremacy.Key Ideas and Specifics : CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3 Examine the consequences of the author’s decisions about how to develop and connect the many aspects of a tale or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

  • Even while whites continue to orchestrate festivals among the slave population in South Carolina, free people are free to congregate and spend time with one another whenever they choose.
  • And what do these get-togethers have to say about community, kinship, and happiness?
  • What aspects of South Carolina’s enslavement are similar to those of slavery?
  • What characteristics distinguish South Carolina from Randall?
  • Her reading materials include a Bible and almanacs, which “Cora admired.
  • What role does the act of reading, and hence literacy, play in Cora’s ability to be free?

Consider, as well, how Ethel and Ridgeway use the Bible and religion to justify slavery: “If God had not intended for Africans to be enslaved, they would not be in chains” (195); and Cora’s observation: “Slavery is a sin when whites are subjected to the yoke, but not when Africans are subjected to the yoke” (195).

  • This is how Ridgeway describes his position: “I’m an idea of order.” Likewise, the slave who vanishes is only a fictitious concept.
  • If we allow it to happen, we are acknowledging the fault in the imperative.
  • Is there a “defect in the imperative,” and why is it critical for Ridgeway and the larger institution of enslavement that is reliant on Black people that this flaw be addressed and eliminated?
  • Mingo and Lander are similar in many ways.
  • What are the similarities and differences between these two guys and Booker T.
  • E.
  • Du Bois?

Examine the relevance of how each person who worked on the railroad—from station agents to conductors—was influenced by their jobs and the railroad itself.

Which concepts such as resistance, agency, and responsibility do these individuals hold dear to their hearts?

The ability to read and to be literate provided one with a tremendous instrument for comprehending the world and for liberating others from oppression.

Consider the significance of the Valentine library, which boasts “the largest collection of negroliterature this side of Chicago,” among other things (273).

What role does Cora’s experience play in articulating the relationship between freedom and literacy?

Cora’s grandmother, Ajarry, is our first introduction to her.

What role does Ajarry play in setting a good example for Mabel, and in especially for Cora, is unclear.

A comparison has been made between the episodic structure of The Underground Railroad and that of Jonathan Swift’sGulliver’s Travels by Colson Whitehead.

A station agent tells Cora, “If you want to see what this country is all about, I always say you have to ride the rails,” as he tells her he wants her to ride the trains.

What role does Lumbly’s appraisal play in framing Cora’s next phase of her trip once she leaves Georgia?

Cora travels the majority of the way by herself.

Years ago, she had taken a wrong turn and was no longer able to find her way back to the folks she had left behind” (145).

Also, how do her travels influence her perspective on the ever-present threat of sexual assault against Black women, as well as the general lack of protection for enslaved women?

Examine the Friday Festivals and the night riders to see how they compare.

What are the ways in which these occurrences express worries of black rebellion?

Instead, he and his family were sold and split apart by the government.

Gulliver’s Travels is the title of the book.

The notion of literacy for freedom is sustained by Caesar’s hunger for knowledge in what way is unclear.

Who was the one who started it?

The question is, how could this be both a “community striving for something precious and unique” and a threat to others (such as the residents in the nearby town, slave hunters, and so on)?

Is there a clear message about risk and return in this?

Why is Sam the only one that returns to Cora out of all of the agents she has encountered?

Look at page 285 and see how Lander responds to Mingo.

What is the role of illusion throughout the narrative, and why is this particular moment so important for the acts that follow?

“You have a responsibility to pass on something beneficial to your children” (293).

What is their legacy in Cora, and how has it been realized?

Examine the relevance of turning the Underground Train into a real-world railroad system.

Create stations for students to study and debate each advertising based on a framing text (for example, “New Databases Offer Insight into the Lives of Escaped Slaves” from the New York Times).

What are some of the parallels and contrasts between the actual announcements and Cora’s version of them?

Knowledge and ideas are integrated in this process.

“That tale, like so many that we tell about our nation’s past, has a complicated relationship to the truth: not exactly false, but simplified; not quite a myth, but mythologized,” argues Kathryn Schultz in her essay “The Perilous Lure of the Underground Railroad” in the New Yorker.

For what reason is it necessary to emphasize African Americans’ participation in the abolitionist movement?

According to the Slave Memorial Act of 2003, “the District of Columbia shall be the site of a memorial to slavery to: (1) acknowledge the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery throughout the United States and its thirteen American colonies; and (2) honor the nameless and forgotten men, women, and children who have gone unrecognized for their undeniable and weighty contribution to the development of the United States.

” There are no national monuments dedicated to the enslavement of Africans in the United States at this time.

What is the most appropriate method to commemorate and remember the enslavement of African people?

Draw on examples from the book to support your reasoning as you create an artistic depiction that places Cora inside that lineage, stretching the history all the way to the current day.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.7 Research projects that are both short and long in duration are carried out to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; when necessary, inquiries are narrowed or broadened; and multiple sources on the subject are synthesized to demonstrate understanding of the subject under investigation.

One of the episodes should be chosen as a starting point for doing critical analysis and presenting findings from research on one of the issues listed below, along with an explanation of how that topic relates to the novel’s themes.

forced sterilization, settler colonialism, lynching, African Americans and abolitionism, African American slave rebellions, sexual violence against African American women, reparations, literacy practices during and after enslavement, the role of white women in slavery, maroons and maronage, racial health disparities, and reparations.

  • (Ta-Nehisi Coates, “The Case for Reparations,” The Atlantic, November 2005.
  • Social Theory, Sociology, “Settler Colonialism: An Introduction from the Perspective of Global Social Theory.” (E.
  • The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City.
  • NPR’s “Fresh Air” program.
  • Kathryn, “The Perilous Lure of the Underground Railroad” is a book about the Underground Railroad.
  • Works of Spectacular Interest Podcast with a historically black cast.
  • Ashley Bryan is a writer of children’s books.

Ava DuVernay’s Thirteenth (film) Strange Fruit: Uncelebrated Narratives from Black History, by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Alex Haley (film), Joel C.

Zora Neale Hurston’s novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, is a classic.

Promoting High Achievement Among African American Students, Young, Gifted, and Black (Young, Gifted, and Black), Theresa Perry is a woman who works in the fashion industry.

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is located in Washington, DC.

Gregory Christie is a writer and poet from the United Kingdom.

Heather’s book, Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery, is a must-read for anybody interested in African American history.

Author of Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom, Heather A.

Monroe Work is the webpage for the Lynching Project.

Kimberly N.

Previously, she served as president of the New England Association of Teachers of English and as the National Council of Teachers of English’s Secondary Representative at-Large for the secondary division.

A Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Illinois at Champaign, Dr. Parker is an expert in the field of education. WHAT THIS BOOK IS ABOUThtml /

The Underground Railroad

TEACHERS: PLEASE READ THIS. Teacher’s Guideline The Underground Railroad is a term used to describe a system of transportation that allows people to flee their homes and seek asylum elsewhere in the country. A new novel by Colson Whitehead introduces Cora, a young African American woman who journeys to freedom from the antebellum South on a fantastically imagined physical railroad, as opposed to the more traditional metaphor of a train journey. The places and people Cora encounters throughout the novel, which is told in episodic form, provide her and the reader with profound revelations about the consequences of enslavement.

By reading Cora’s story, the reader will be reminded of the importance of hope, rebellion, and freedom, making The Underground Railroadan essential addition to any classroom.

An understanding of the slave trade, slavery, and how it operated in the United States is necessary in order to make sense of the number of Africans who were enslaved and the historical legacy of enslavement that has lasted through Reconstruction, the civil rights movement, and up to the present day, among other things.

  • Most importantly, incorporating The Underground Railroadallows readers to bear witness to a counter-narrative of slavery that is not often discussed in the literature about slavery.
  • The Underground Railroad is an appropriate selection for grades eleven and twelve language arts or United States history classes because it supports the national Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in reading literature for high school curriculums.
  • It is also an excellent choice for first-year and common reading programs.
  • The prompts are organized according to the standard that they primarily support in each section.
  • If you want to see a complete list of the Standards, visit the following website: warnings: Numerous scenes of violence are depicted throughout the text (sexual and physical).
  • Rather than avoiding these moments, teachers should assist students in navigating them through discussion and critical analysis.
  • A number of suggestions are provided in the pre-reading activities for how to build a community that fosters critical thinking.

Examine her ownership of a plot of land, her friendships with the Hob women, her refusal to back down from danger, her pursuit of literacy, and a variety of other activities.

Even though whites continue to orchestrate celebrations among slaves in South Carolina, the free people are free to congregate and spend time with one another whenever they want.

Was there a sense of belonging, kinship, and joy in these gatherings?

Why is enslavement in South Carolina similar to it?

South Carolina is worse than Randall in what ways, you might ask.

One of Cora’s favorite reading materials is a Bible and almanacs, which she “adored.

Is it possible for Cora to be free through the act of reading and literacy?

Consider how Ethel and Ridgeway use the Bible and religion to justify slavery: “If God had not intended for Africans to be enslaved, they would not be in chains” (195), and Cora’s observation: “Slavery is a sin when whites are subjected to the yoke, but not when Africans are subjected to the yoke” (195).

  1. This is how Ridgeway describes his position: “I’m a concept of order.
  2. a glimmer of possibility What I’m doing is being undone in order for a slave on the next plantation over to get the impression that he or she can run as well.
  3. “I’m not going to do it” (223).
  4. When did hope for freedom become such a dangerous proposition?
  5. What are the beliefs of each man, and how do those beliefs influence the future of Valentine Farm?
  6. Washington and William Edwards Bryant?
  7. Dissect the significance of how each person who worked on the railroad—from station agents to conductors—was influenced by their jobs.

Which concepts such as resistance, agency, and responsibility do these people hold dear to their hearts?

When you visit the Valentine library, you can talk about Cora’s culmination of her literacy journey.

See also:  What Was Underground Railroad Like? (Best solution)

What is it about the library’s contents and Cora’s experience there that is so important?

Craftsmanship and structure are important.

It is through Cora’s grandmother, Ajarry, that we first meet her.

When it comes to setting an example for Mabel and Cora, how does Ajarry contribute to this effort?

A comparison has been made between the episodic structure of The Underground Railroad and that of Jonathan Swift’sGulliver’s Travels.

A station agent tells Cora, “If you want to see what this country is all about, I always say you have to ride the rails,” as he tells her he has been riding the rails for years.

Cora’s journey after leaving Georgia is framed by Lumbly’s assessment of her.

When it comes to helping the reader understand the novel’s structure, what exactly does it do?

Despite the fact that she has company at various points along her journey, she is ultimately alone: “She was a stray after all.” She had taken a wrong turn somewhere along the road of life and was unable to find her way back to her family of people” (145).

How does her travel experience influence her perspective on the ever-present threat of sexual violence against Black women and the broader lack of protection for enslaved women?

Inquire about the Friday Night Festivals, as well as the night riders What is the purpose of each one of these things?

Caesar had been betrayed by his owner, who had promised to release him upon her death, but had instead committed suicide instead.

While on the Randall plantation, he conceals a book and reads it in the evening.

Examine the significance of literacy for Caesar, particularly in light of the lines “But if he didn’t read, he was a slave” (235) and “Now a page here and there, in the golden afternoon light, sustained him” (235).

The theme of literacy for freedom is sustained by Caesar’s thirst for knowledge in what ways?

In terms of forming a Maroon society, think of the establishment of Valentine Farm.

Who was the person who lived in that house?

Sam continued his Underground Railroad work despite the fact that he had lost his employment.

Is there anything in Sam’s work that suggests he believes in his mission and that he understands the responsibilities of those who worked as agents and conductors for the railroad?

Consider the significance of his return, especially in light of the time and location of his arrival.

“Sometimes a useful delusion is preferable to a useless truth,” Lander counters.

I’m not sure what Lander means, but it’s something like this: The novel’s use of illusion is explained in detail, as is the significance of this particular scene in the plot.

” (293).

When it comes to Cora, how is their legacy manifest?

Find out why it’s important to make the Underground Railroad a genuine railroad.

Create stations for students to analyze and discuss each advertisement based on a framing text (e.g., “New Databases Offer Insight into the Lives of Escaped Slaves” from the New York Times).

Are there any parallels or differences between the actual announcements and Cora’s version of them?

Knowledge and ideas are brought together.

“That story, like so many that we tell about our nation’s past, has a tricky relationship to the truth: not quite wrong, but simplified; not quite a myth, but mythologized,” Kathryn Schultz writes in “The Perilous Lure of the Underground Railroad,” an article published in the New Yorker magazine.

When it comes to abolition, it is critical to emphasize the contributions of African Americans.

Slave Memorial Act of 2003 authorizes the National Foundation for African American Heritage to establish a slave memorial in the District of Columbia to: (1) acknowledge the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery in the United States and its thirteen American colonies; and (2) honor the nameless and forgotten men, women, and children who have gone unrecognized for their undeniable and weighty contribution to the United States.

A national monument commemorating the enslavement of Africans in America does not exist at the present time.

As a result of enslavement, what is the most appropriate way to remember and honor it?

Draw on examples from the text to support your thinking as you create an artistic representation that places Cora within that lineage, extending the timeline to the present day in your work.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.WHST.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as longer-term research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the scope of the inquiry as necessary; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating knowledge of the subject under investigation.

One of the episodes should be chosen as a starting point for conducting critical analysis and presenting findings from research on one of the topics listed below, along with an explanation of how that topic relates to the novel’s main themes.

forced sterilization, settler colonialism, lynching, African Americans and abolitionism, African American slave rebellions, sexual violence against African American women, reparations, literacy practices during and after enslavement, the role of white women in slavery, maroons and maronage, racial health disparities, and reparations ResourcesAbolition Seminar (Ta-Nehisi Coates, “The Case for Reparations,” The Atlantic, 2004).

Justice Institute Study on Lynching in the United States.” ) (Feminism, “Compulsory Sterilization in 50 American States”) (Feminism, “Compulsory Sterilization in 50 American States”) In this article, you’ll learn what a “White Savior” is (and why he’s the polar opposite of beneficial).

“New Databases Provide Insight Into the Lives of Escaped Slaves,” according to the New York Times, ” New York Times (New York, New York, United States of America) A literal train to freedom runs through Whitehead’s “Underground Railroad.” It’s the National Public Radio program, “Fresh Air.” “Maroons and Marronage” is a bibliography of books.

  1. New Yorker magazine has published an article on this.
  2. a newspaper based in Washington Octavia Butler’s novel, Kindred Merely having the ability to choose, In the field of children’s literature, Ashley Bryan works with young people.
  3. Author Ta-Nehisi Coates has written a book titled Between the World and Me.
  4. The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross, by Henry Louis Gates, Jr.
  5. Alexandra Haley (film), Joel C.
  6. Toni Morrison’s Song of Solomon is an example of literary excellence.
  7. Henrietta Lacks: An Unexpected Life by Rebecca Skloot is a novel about a woman who has the ability to live forever.

Denzel Washington, Denzel Washington’s Great Debaters, Denzel Washington’s Literacy as Freedom In Congo Square, Carol Boston Weatherford explores the concept of “freedom.” Gregory Christie is a writer and poet from New York City.

Heather’s book, Help Me to Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery, is a must-read for anybody interested in slavery.

She has a degree in English literature from Columbia University.

Johnson Andrea Williams is a writer who lives in New York City.

The Monroe Work webpage for the Lynching Project is available online.

Kimberly N.

Previously, she served as president of the New England Association of Teachers of English and as the National Council of Teachers of English’s Secondary Representative at-Large for a period of time.

A Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Illinois at Champaign, Dr. Parker is an expert in the field of curriculum development. INTRODUCTION HTML / CONTENTS

Home of Levi Coffin

Levi Coffin’s residence in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived as an American Quaker and abolitionist. This was a station on the Underground Railroad, a network of routes, locations, and individuals that assisted enslaved persons in escaping to the North during the Civil War. Cincinnati Museum Center provided the photography. “> During the age of slavery, the Underground Railroad was a network of routes, locations, and individuals that assisted enslaved persons in the American South in escaping to the North, according to the Underground Railroad Museum.

Although it was not a real railroad, it fulfilled the same function as one: it carried passengers across large distances.

The people who worked for the Underground Railroad were driven by a passion for justice and a desire to see slavery abolished—a drive that was so strong that they risked their lives and jeopardized their own freedom in order to assist enslaved people in escaping from bondage and staying safe while traveling the Underground Railroad.

  • As the network expanded, the railroad metaphor became more prevalent.
  • In recent years, academic research has revealed that the vast majority of persons who engaged in the Underground Railroad did it on their own, rather than as part of a larger organization.
  • According to historical tales of the railroad, conductors frequently pretended to be enslaved persons in order to smuggle runaways out of plantation prisons and train stations.
  • Often, the conductors and passengers traveled 16–19 kilometers (10–20 miles) between each safehouse stop, which was a long distance in this day and age.
  • Patrols on the lookout for enslaved persons were usually on their tails, chasing them down.
  • Historians who study the railroad, on the other hand, find it difficult to distinguish between fact and fiction.
  • Eric Foner is one of the historians that belongs to this group.
  • Despite this, the Underground Railroad was at the center of the abolitionist struggle during the nineteenth century.
  • Levi Coffin’s residence in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived as an American Quaker and abolitionist.
  • Cincinnati Museum Center provided the photography.
  • Person who is owned by another person or group of people is referred to as an enslaved person.

Slavery is a noun that refers to the act of owning another human being or being owned by another human being (also known as servitude). Abolitionists utilized this nounsystem between 1800 and 1865 to aid enslaved African Americans in their attempts to flee to free states.

Media Credits

Levi Coffin’s residence in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he lived as an American Quaker and an abolitionist. As a halt on the Underground Railroad, his home served as an important link in the emancipation of slaves from the South to the United States’ northern climes. Cincinnati Museum Center took the photographs. “> While slavery was in effect, the Underground Railroad was a network of routes, locations, and individuals that assisted enslaved persons in the American South in escaping to the northern hemisphere during that time period.

However, even though it was not a genuine railroad, it fulfilled a similar function: it moved people across large distances.

Many of the people who worked on the Underground Railroad were motivated by a desire for justice and a desire to see slavery put out of business—a motivation that was so strong that they were willing to risk their lives and their own freedom in order to aid enslaved individuals in their escape from bondage and to keep them safe along their journey.

  • The train metaphor became more and more prevalent as the network increased in size and complexity.
  • It was known to as “stations” where the runaways were housed, while “station masters” were those who were in charge of concealing the captives.
  • In recent years, academic research has revealed that the vast majority of persons who engaged in the Underground Railroad did it on their own, rather than as members of a larger organization.
  • It has been said that conductors regularly pretended to be enslaved persons in order to smuggle runaways off of plantations during the early days of the railroad.
  • Often, the conductors and passengers went 16–19 kilometers (10–20 miles) between each safehouse stop, which was a long distance for them.
  • On a regular basis, patrols on the lookout for enslaved persons were hard on their tails.
  • Truth and fiction are difficult to distinguish in the minds of historians who study the railroad.

Instead, they argue that much of the action took place openly and in broad daylight.

He went back into the history of the railroad and discovered that, while a massive network existed that kept its actions hidden, the network grew so powerful that it was able to push the myth’s boundaries even farther.

It was the railroad that intensified racial tensions between northern and southern states and hence helped to precipitate the Civil War.

As a halt on the Underground Railroad, his home served as an important link in the emancipation of slaves from the South to the United States’ northern climes.

Civil WarNoun(1860-1865) An American struggle between the Union (north) and the Confederacy (south).

Abolitionists utilized this nounsystem between 1800 and 1865 to aid enslaved African Americans in their attempts to escape to free territories.

Director

Tyson Brown is a member of the National Geographic Society.

Author

The National Geographic Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the exploration of the world’s natural wonders.

Production Managers

Gina Borgia is a member of the National Geographic Society. Jeanna Sullivan is a member of the National Geographic Society.

Program Specialists

According to National Geographic Society’s Sarah Appleton, Margot Willis is a National Geographic Society photographer.

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